Feeding ChaffeHaye -vs- Alfalfa Grass Hay

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Lori Mitten Acres, Mar 10, 2018.

  1. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
    In speaking with a few goat/horse owners I know locally as well as in other states, the price per bale is way up from last year (from $7.00 to $8.75 bale) but the quality of alfalfa grass hay is not very good - bales have a lot of thick stems, don't smell good, and are not as good of quality as previous bales have been ( smelled "grassy", not stem filled, nice grass/alfalfa mix.) Some of the bales I've looked at have a white mold-looking coating on some of the pats which I've passed on purchasing.

    This dilemma has forced me to look at other sources to provide the necessary nutrients, protein and roughage for the new kids.

    I'm wondering if anyone else has fed their herds/goats ChaffeHaye? From the information I've read and the limited number of people I know who have or do feed Chaffehaye, I've decided to feed the ChaffeHaye in addition to a limited supplemental feeding of Lezpedieza Pellets, mixed with dried raspberry leaves, a few dried corn kernels, a few whole oats, top dressed with Icelandic Kelp with free choice minerals and of course, fresh, clean water.

    We have 2 small fenced pastures fenced with a lot of browse and a little grass which will not be enough for the small does to sustain themselves on. We are working on fencing and adding larger, fenced pasture with the same over-grown browse and grassy areas so we can eventually rotate the pasture areas to help manage any parasite issues. Until we get the other areas fenced, we will be supplying enough ChaffeHaye to make up for any loss of nutrients from foraging and/or feeding on pastures.

    What is your experiences feeding ChaffeHaye and what if any supplemental feedings did you provide? I'd love to hear from others and what they are doing to help with the short-comings of alfalfa grass hay these days. I will be feeding 3 Nigerian Dwarf Does, no bucks or weathers to feed yet. Thank you again for any help, input, comments or suggestions you might have!
     
    Kaylam likes this.
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    The chaffehay should be great for them. I haven't fed it personally but only because I can't get it locally.
     

  3. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
    I was lucky to have found a distributor that is about an hour south of me that delivers to a couple of stables that are within 20 miles of our place - I just met her at a Tractor Supply to get the bales. I was talking about the Chaffehaye to a couple of folks and they were talking to their co-op about possibly carrying it - maybe you could reach out to some people to get them to carry it? From everyone I've spoken with that feed their horses Chaffehaye, they are thrilled with it. I'm hoping the goats will do well on it too!
     
  4. Treu Shutz

    Treu Shutz Member

    94
    Feb 27, 2018
    8.75 is great I spent 17.95 on 1 bale of Alfalfa Hay. I need to look around to see if I can get it cheaper.
     
  5. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
    Wow, I'm glad it's not that that price here! Where are you at? We are in se Michigan.
     
  6. Treu Shutz

    Treu Shutz Member

    94
    Feb 27, 2018
    I'm in Northern California. Sadly a lot of things are over priced here.
     
  7. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
  8. DelicasDreamery

    DelicasDreamery Member

    68
    May 27, 2014
    Washington
    I ordered a pallet of Chaffehaye, and they delivered it by truck. I do have the good fortune of owning a construction company and having a forklift to unload it. So if there is a distributer in your area this is always an option too. I believe it was around $600 or so. I had purchased it after several glowing reviews on productivity increasing, and overall health. I didn't notice a difference in this at all. Also, a lot of the bags had a white powder that I was afraid to feed. I've had someone tell me that it was supposed to be in there (yeast or something I forget.) But upon having some bloated goats, and visiting the vet. She practically yelled at me that the chaffehaye was no good. It wasn't the nutrition part, it was the part about the short stems not aiding in digestion. I would think maybe you need to add grass hay to it?
     
  9. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
    We will be supplementing with alfalfa grass hay that will be available at all times which is why I have been looking at hay prices here since the babies will be getting access to hay while they are being weaned and will be familiar to eating it. We were surprised at how difficult good hay has been to find here and how much it costs which led me to the Chaffhaye to begin with!

    The Chaffhaye brochure says it can be a 100% hay replacement so I'd like to have this as an alternative in case we cannot find good hay as was the case in 2011 or 2012 that we had here. From what I have learned, this last year hay was difficult because it so wet here which always affects the costs.

    The "white substance" that you found in the chaffhaye, is the yeast culture that aids in digestion and helps to breakdown the fiber which is normal. You can visit the Chaffhaye website at www.chaffhaye.com and read about the product. They give you a 100% nutrition guarantee and it's got to be a lot better than cubes or pellets.

    The Chaffe Haye dealer here gave me a couple of people to contact who have goats that we will contact and see how they feed their herds.

    After we have some experience with feeding the Chaffhaye, we will post what we experience!
     
    Kaylam likes this.
  10. Treu Shutz

    Treu Shutz Member

    94
    Feb 27, 2018
    Thanks I think there's a cheaper place to buy the hay from. There's tons of ranches and farms near me and I doubt they're spending that much on hay.
     
  11. Lori Mitten Acres

    Lori Mitten Acres New Member

    11
    Nov 3, 2017
    SE Michigan
    We are going to see what some of the other farms use here - hopefully some have farmers who grow hay instead of buying their bales at the auction house. I've spoken to a couple of my neighbors and was surprised to learn they both get their hay at the auction house which can be iffy in the quality of a lot and prices are not that good either. We are looking now so we can have some hay put up and just rotate the bales so we are not in a bind to get good hay. The Chaffhaye is $16 for a 50 lb bag which is about a bale and a half I think. We will definitely keep looking for good quality hay and hopefully at a reasonable price!
     
  12. Candace Martin

    Candace Martin New Member

    2
    Mar 27, 2018
    You have no idea how lucky you are. I live on the Big Island in Hawaii. Alfalfa is $38-$40 per bale. You have two choices, regular bale or compressed bale. No Chaffhaye available. They also have Orchard grass hay, you guessed it, also $38-$40 per bale. Therefore, we rely a lot on browse. Shipping is a horrible cost here as most hay comes in from California or Arizona.
     
  13. spidy1

    spidy1 Well-Known Member

    I tried the chafhay once, my goats WOULD NOT eat it, "mom it's wet"
     
  14. lottsagoats1

    lottsagoats1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2014
    Middle Maine
    I fed it for a year, when I could afford it. Up here it is wicked expensive. Yes, that white stuff is the yeast culture and very good for them. My goats went crazy for it the first time I fed it out to them. My goats would dive for the white parts! They did so well on it. Milk production went way up, more so than when I fed alfalfa pellets. You can't get alfalfa hay up here, it just doesn't cure well to be used as hay.

    I know so many goat people that do use it for their dairy goats in place of hay and have never had a problem. There are stems in it, it is a roughage, it has been fermented and chopped so it is soft and you don't really notice the stems.

    When I fed it, my goats still got their concentrates (commercial goat feed and whole native oats) and any browse I could find that came down during a storm. I only have 1 acre, so they are dry lotted.
     
    Goat_Scout likes this.
  15. IHEARTGOATS

    IHEARTGOATS Well-Known Member

    Jun 14, 2016
    Zebulon, NC
    I don't know how many goats you have but once you open a bag it has to be used within a certain amount of time
    It will mold
    I know a farm that uses it exclusively
    But I know more that will not
    We tried it and the goats liked it but we have better options
    I don't think it's the greatest thing since sliced bread
    I'm curious where you are that grass hay is hard to find?
     
  16. Goat town

    Goat town Active Member

    172
    May 6, 2018
    I’ve tried several different kinds of grass hay on my Nigeria dwarfs but they’ll only eat alfalfa and at the feed store it’s $20.00 a bale but it’s good and thankfully I only have 3
     
  17. We recently started feeding Chaffhaye to ours. It's the same price as the bag/bale of chopped alfalfa here. Ours love it. They were in good health, to begin with, but just the short amount of time they have been on it they have gotten super shiny and soft. Way less waste with it so for us a better option. We don't have any issues with mold at all. We do ferments at our house so I'm familiar with the difference in mold and yeast. We do still offer grass hay as well. It's not their sole source of hay. They are currently dry-lotted but will be on pasture by the end of the year.
     
  18. wifeof1

    wifeof1 Well-Known Member

    Mar 17, 2016
    Boulevard, CA
    I lost a whole bag to mold. I'm sticking with alfalfa and browse.
     
  19. CritterCarnival

    CritterCarnival Yes Dear Goat Farm

    Sep 17, 2013
    Western Kentucky
    My goats love Chaffhaye and I love how easy it is to feed and there is no waste.

    Only problem I found...I can't use it fast enough to keep it fresh in the hot, humid weather of summer. If sealed, weather is not an issue, but once a bag has been opened it must be fed quickly or it will mold and become unusable. They recommend parceling it out and freezing it, but I just don't have enough freezer space for a 50 pound bag of chaffhaye!

    Luckily, we have enough browse/pasture in summer that we don't really need it, and can start back up once the weather cools.