fencing bucks

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by AlaskaBoers, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    now that I have two bucks :roll:
    I put them in two pens, both up along side each other, one hour later odin has jumped the 5ft fence and was hanging out with the newbie. I dont mind that they are together, they arent really getting too rough, just blubbering to each other. :wink:

    but eventually I'll need to make a very heavy duty pen, for these boys this winter. anyone have pics of their set-ups? it just needs to hold up, my wleded wire fencing isnt holding up very well, electric isnt an option right now either. any ideas?

    thanks :greengrin:
     
  2. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    I use cattle panel. TOUGH, they can't bend it or knock it over. Just a post on each end and one in the middle. If you have worries about them getting their heads through and stuck, cover it on the outside with smaller wire, just any cheap garden fencing. My Buckly's horns are too big for him to get his big dumb head through there, and my new buckling is polled, so no big deal there, though I DID end up covering it with wire because I had a doe and her kids in there for a while.

    They also make other types of panel, stock, combination, horse, which have smaller holes if you'd rather just get those.
     

  3. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    how spendy are those? last time I looked they were $45-$50 each.
     
  4. bheila

    bheila New Member

    644
    Jan 9, 2009
    Kent, Wa
    We just bought 4 cattle panels 4'x16' and they were $29 each on sale. They were normally $37. I would like to get the panels with the smaller squares since the kids will be able to get through the cattle panels, but for now I can use them for adult goats and even my dogs. I love the portability of them.
     
  5. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    Ok Folks, we are talking Alaska here! The only thing that isn't expensive is the fresh air! Every thing involving goats or livestock has to be shipped in. Katrina, have you thought about building a heavy post and rail wood fence? Heavy posts in the ground about every 8 feet with rails between running horizontally. Then attaching 2-3 inch small posts to the rail next to each other as pickets. Wood is a building material that is easily accessed in AK so use a natural resource that is readily available. Or build (I know this sounds crazy) a rock wall. If you build it out of pipe or wire this may be too expensive. I hope this inspires you! :idea:
     
  6. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    wood would (lol) be easier. maybe 2x6 every few inches apart. My former buck, thor could easily snap a 2x4 with a quick twist of his horns.

    i just got a herd of 7 fullblood and very high percentage boers, when i get them trimmed up and washed, i'll take pics. so you'll have to wait !!! :wink:
     
  7. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    these must be the ones you mentioned on Facebook ooo so excited
     
  8. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    Cattle panel are usually between 18.99 - 21.99 here, but then again, this is Texas. I forgot about Alaska.

    Sorry! :doh:
     
  9. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    With the exception of a stone fence, setting your posts 8' apart in two feet of concrete is next to ideal.
    If you can find throw away stop sign posts from you local road maintenance its even better. Load up on a street roller or two while your there.
    We got those bags of Quickcrete, the set up & cure on it is practically zip.
    Katrina, unless there's super heavy duty gauge welded wire I wouldnt use it. Dont waste your time money or aggravation to start with it cause all they have to do is think about standing on it and it's toast.
    Around here with woven wire the does can beat it to shreds in minutes butting on opposite sides of fence.
    Here's something I wish we would have thought of in the first place; to build with removeable panels somehow, maybe thats where your cattle panels could come in?
    Looking fwd to seeing your lovely does! Are these the ones from Copperpenney's?
     
  10. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    2X6s would be good. We just go out in the woods and cut oak saplings 2-3 inches big around and cut down to 6 foot and screw them to the fence stringers with galvanized screws. It looks kinda rustic and it keeps the billies from seeing the does through the fence. I would post pics but I'm a TGS picture posting ignoramus and every time I try it lets me know how stupid I really am. :sigh: :doh: :scratch:

    And it would act as a good windbreak and snow fence!
     
  11. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    I have my bucks in a seven line five foot tall electric fence, it works great. But i know you said electtric isnt an option. I would vote for the wood fence, but i know wood can get pricey. stock panels around here run about thirty three bucks a panel. Good fence but even then i would use three strands of electric fence to keep them off of it.
    beth
     
  12. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    no the does didnt work out with copperpenny, darn borders!
    my new does have a separate thread

    but we have a bunch of old 10' 2x6's stacked behind the goat shed, i'll use those, and good idea with the concrete.
     
  13. Sweet Gum Minis

    Sweet Gum Minis New Member

    Oct 6, 2007
    Easley, SC
    I originally ran my buck fence with a woven wire. However, the fence doesn't hold up well for bucks at all. I do use a hot wire to ensure the bucks don't ruin the fence or get out. On the doe side it was the cheap welded wire which was our very first fence run. I've since covered it in cattle panels and tied the welded to the cattle panels to ensure no issues with does and heats. lol Cattle panels here are $19.99 and they're 4' high 16' long. They're priceless when it comes to durability. As a matter of fact we're going to slowly take down the crappy field fence we'd originally run around our doe pasture and replace it with cattle panels. At least on the back side. That and the buck fence too.
     
  14. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    yeah your so right, that welded wire is no good! at least woven wire doesnt come apart as easily. we have hog panels for our pigs and even my 1,000lbs + sow cant break through them!
     
  15. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Hog panels would work too, though I don't think they are tall enough. If you can get the hog panels at a decent price you can use those and put the 2x6's as rails between posts across the top to add height. For my goats, with the 16x4 galvanized panels, I space the t-posts at 4 feet as my bucks can be hell on them when in rut. This keeps them from bowing the panels when they ram them :wink: