Fencing difficulties

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by rebelshope, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    I just got a new no climb fence! This area is shared with the horses. Although I may use eclectic fence to make two or three smaller areas. Then I could keep one area from getting over eaten.

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    The horses have a three rail fenced dry lot which opens in to this "no climb area" The three rail part is not covered with the no climb so I have to add something to it to make it suitable for the goats. I am think electric. Here you can see looking into the three rail, from the no climb fenced area.
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    My question is how may strands and where? Two below the bottom board and two between the next two boards. Or one in each spot or two in the middle and one on the bottom, or one in the middle and two on the bottom
    Here is April walking under the three rail-
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    Chey walking up to it,
    [​IMG]

    Here is another problem area. The water in the spring flows under here. This is not the worst spot, there is a worse spot that is much longer. I am wondering if making a rock pile here will keep the goats in as well as allow the water to flow through?
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for you opinions in advance.
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Friend used that type of fencing and put one row of hot wire on the bottom below the bottom rail and then on top of the bottom rail between the bottom and middle rail. So two strands one on either side of the bottom rail. That should cover it

    Also the goats dont like water so they shouldnt even try to slide under as they would get wet which we all know is a big deal LOL
     

  3. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    Thanks. .. :) I knew someone would have dealth with this.



    Normally the area dries up, but this year and last year it has not. Who know what will happen next year. :) Plus in the winter it will freeze.
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well you could put some chicken wire along that part of the fence and dig it into the ground where it is higher dirt but it would be exposed where the little water run off is
     
  5. ChestnutGrove

    ChestnutGrove New Member

    265
    Apr 29, 2009
    Tennessee
    We have lot of rock on our place and I use them all the time at any low spots in the fence and it works great - I try to pick big rocks (as much large as I dare to move which sometimes is foolishly large) and pile them at any spots that I think they can get under. I have spots just like the one in your picture and using rocks works great.

    The hot fence - keep sure the hot fence works well - be prepared that some of them will hit it and go forward and take out your line and you need to put it back up - but hopefully they will reliese it "bites" and keep away from it after that (I have had that happen with the Nigerians that they hit the hot fence and went forward instead of backwards - I about cried as I had to put it back up). One wire at the bottom and one wire at the middle opening might work. I was told try to put the level you think they will put their nose when they go to duck under it as that way they hit their nose first and they will back up - I found that tends to be the most effective also.

    Your new fence looks nice! I love our horse no climb fencing.

    Deidre :horse:
     
  6. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    Thank you. :)

    It used to be just for the horses and it was all electric but as you can see behind the fence is long grass and in the marshy areas I couldn't mow. So every time I let them out there I was afraid that I would come home to loose horses. Which did happen now and then. Today I went to pick up a few barrels and was gone for 5 hours. I was SO relieved during the whole trip that I did not have to worry about if the horses would get out.

    Now I just have to put up the hot wire and see what happens for the goats. I am hoping that it works out well. In the end I plan on having an alley in between the three rail and the 2 or 3 smaller pastures so I can rotate. I am not sure if I will do a 6 or 7 strand fence or break down and get netting. Then the goats would not even be able to get to the three rail.
     
  7. ChestnutGrove

    ChestnutGrove New Member

    265
    Apr 29, 2009
    Tennessee
    Have you thought of putting the horse no climb fencing on the rail fencing? Just an idea. Fencing goats in or out can be a challenge - I know my goats have won more than I have through the decades!

    Deidre :horse:
     
  8. rebelshope

    rebelshope New Member

    908
    Sep 20, 2008
    Wisconsin
    I had someone do the no climb fence and with the addition of another gate and another problem I rather stretched my fencing budget. I have to do everything else on my own, no husband, no extra help. I am just not sure I put properly put up the no climb on my own.

    Now I am wondering if the gates are a little high and what to do about that.
     
  9. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Putting wire across the bottom half of the split rail is fairly simple to do as you have a rigid area to staple to. Just cut the fence to the height it needs to be and keep it level with the ground. Gates being too far off the ground are easily fixed temporarily with a few rocks under them.
     
  10. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    We use electric fence for cross fencing exclusively. If you want to keep the goats off of the horse wire fence, then put a stand off hot wire about 10-12 inches from the ground and another a 24 inches. We put the fence 40 inches high with 5 wires. One at six inches up, next at 6 inches higher, next at 8, next at 10, and the last at 10. this keeps our boers in, even kids. I must stress this next point! BUY THE HOTTEST CHARGER THAT YOU CAN AFFORD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    It is not the tension of the wire or how pretty the fence looks, it is the electrical power that goes through the wire that keeps the goats in. I use a 15 joule charger and if they made an even more powerful one I would be standing in line to buy one! The fence charger is something that you can not skimp on!
    Get an electric fence building guide and follow it to the letter. Keep the high weeds from grounding the fence. We mow along each side with the riding mower and spray generic roundup under it to keep the grass from grounding it out, about every month.
    Good luck, I hope this helps!
    If you need any help, then e-mail and I will try to help! :hi5: