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Hey guys!

Show me pictures of your pasture rotation. We have a 3/4 acre pasture that the three goats share, and I'd love to get into pasture rotation... the thing is, I don't want to divide it up into four spaces permanently if I can avoid it.

What type of electric fencing do you use? I'm hesitant to get it because I've heard horror stories about goats getting caught in it and zapped until they die or are severely hurt.

If I don't do it, I'm definitely going to purchase some bioworma for the spring. I heard that one local goat homesteader had a 40% increase of milk production once they started using it with their small herd. Has anyone used it? Anyone work out the cost per goat per month?
 

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I'm interested to see pictures as well, as that's about the size of our pasture and we'll have a total of four ND does on it. I've been stumped on how to implement pasture rotation within our current fenced area.
 

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Hey guys!

Show me pictures of your pasture rotation. We have a 3/4 acre pasture that the three goats share, and I'd love to get into pasture rotation... the thing is, I don't want to divide it up into four spaces permanently if I can avoid it.

What type of electric fencing do you use? I'm hesitant to get it because I've heard horror stories about goats getting caught in it and zapped until they die or are severely hurt.

If I don't do it, I'm definitely going to purchase some bioworma for the spring. I heard that one local goat homesteader had a 40% increase of milk production once they started using it with their small herd. Has anyone used it? Anyone work out the cost per goat per month?
Look up galagher fencing. It is pretty light.... even i can do it with my dumb back. Super easy to put up and down cause it is all on a one reel system.... poles, line, tie down supports and all. And it is made to be hot or i guess you can not make it hot. You can adjust the height of your lines how you want them. It is not horrible expensive for what it is. We have mini nubians and two cows... they all stay in it. Tat. Ay be because they all respect the hot but we have not had any escapees and we have used it since spring or early summer i think.
 

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You can also look at premier 1 electric netting. I've used it for the last couple years and it works well.
Hahahha i always say the galagher now cause i like that i can help to move it. We use the netting too (ours is kencove and a bit cheaper) and it works great too!
 

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Hahahha i always say the galagher now cause i like that i can help to move it. We use the netting too (ours is kencove and a bit cheaper) and it works great too!
This summer I'm going to probably get Galagher so I can use my front pastures instead of basically dry lotting so I can buy hay all summer to store for next winter...this years hay bill is breaking the bank so I'm going to buy a couple extra bales a week till I have a decent back up supply.
 

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It might be possible to put up electric wire and T-posts, or maybe those smaller metal posts that are made out of re-bar-like material, to create temporary barriers inside your existing pasture. That's what I ended up going with for the majority of my goat pastures, as electric netting was out of my price range.
What kind of fence are they in now? If they aren't used to electric, then you'll have to train them on it. I'm still fairly new to goats, but in this past year, I've had a lot of success with keeping them in electric. I just did 3 strands of electric wire, and once they were trained on it, it worked well. I'll tell you what I did to train my goats to electric wire, and though I haven't used the netting, I would think that the process could be similar?
I started by putting an electric standoff inside my welded wire fence. This taught them about what the wire would do if they touched it, while still keeping them contained if they panicked as they got shocked (which they did, especially the first several times).
Then, I moved them into a pen that was right next to the old welded wire pen (so still familiar territory for them). It's welded wire on 3 sides, and electric across the front. I put strips of plastic bag tied at intervals along the electric wire, so that there was a clear visual for them. Once they were staying in that fence, I was able to move them around and put them in all electric fences with no issues.
The main thing is to make changes slowly and let them get used to new fencing gradually and in a place where they feel comfortable and safe and from which they can't escape or get themselves in trouble. When you're moving them from one fence to another, always move them as a group so that no-one panics and runs through a fence because they feel they're being left behind.
Good luck!
 

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Pasture hm grass? I really wish that people would learn goats and quit starving them to grass.
3/4 acre could easily contain 100 mulberry coppice, 100 princess tree coppice, 100 bass tree coppice, plus native understory plants, waterleaf, miners lettuce, ferns, and wild grains, day lillies, etc.

Goats are very efficient browsers, they will eat grass when that is what is available but, it isn't what they need.
 
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