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After a month of training I took my first goat pack trip. It was a short one 3 ½ miles in and back out. And here are some of my observations.
1. The goat walks slower than I do
2. The goat doesn’t want to be left behind and will catch up. So observation #1is not a problem
3. In camp the goat is like a dog he will fallow you every where.
4. He will sleep as close to the tent as he can. He woke me up twice during the night
5. I will never buy another back pack, another goat pack may be nice for the kitchen sink.

I am a scout leader and I went out with some scouts on an overnighter. The young men really enjoyed the goat. This short camp out was to teach the boys alternative camping. There were alternate types of tents and stoves. And packing ideas demonstrated. I learned a lot as a leader.
 

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girl scouts should go camping. these days they do crafts in a HUGE "cabin" that has bunks, running water, electricity, a full kitchen, etc. :roll: and that's "camp"?!?! NOT EVEN CLOSE!!!! i was in long enough to laugh hysterically at all those sissies who were whining about having to "camp out"!!! craziness! :shock:
anyway, my cousins are in boy scouts and i'm trying to get them to visit while my does are kidding. i seriously hope they can come! i can't wait to see all them sissy boys from the city! "EWW! what is THAT?!" :lol: ha ha ha ha ha!!!! it'll be great! :lol:
i'm walking mine about a mile a day. weather permitting. but mine don't seem to be having fun yet :D hee hee! glad you can share the goat experience!
 

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fivemoremiles said:
1. The goat walks slower than I do
2. The goat doesn’t want to be left behind and will catch up. So observation #1is not a problem
Hello,

many goatpackers have made the observation that a goat's walking speed is a bit slower than a human's walking speed.

Regarding your point 2: if the goat has always to run to catch up it will become a problem on longer hikes and with heavier loads. The goat will tire more quickly that way and overheating can occur faster.

Why not reduce your speed so that the goat can follow without problems? It is carrying my load, doing my work, so - in my opinion - it's my responsibility to look out for the goat's wellfare.
 

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fivemoremiles said:
1. The goat walks slower than I do
I treat the goats just like I treat the women and children on the trip. I just run, and if they get left behind the Volunteer Mountain Rescue Team will find them. .... Just kidding, don't send me nastygrams.

I trained my yearlings to run with me without loads. We did 3 miles once with only a bit of a breather in the middle, if that's what you call a tumble into a ravine and a slow climb out. My motivation is not to make them walk faster, but to develop that willingness to stay with me whatever I do. It helped to get spooked by a bull.

I will normally walk at a pace that is comfortable for them, and I watch them for heavy breathing. At the first sign of discomfort (mine) I declare that the goats need a rest. On hot days I cool their heads and necks with water. We go out when it is close to 100 sometimes.

If a goat shuts down on you, you'll wait till it's ready to go, which won't save you much time at all. I pushed Diego too much once and as we passed other hikers that were resting, he joined their herd and wouldn't budge until every last one of them left. We were hiking with a friend and I was keeping his pace rather than theirs on a pretty good climb. Naturally I had to wait until every last one of the other hikers left as well.

The last thing I want is for them to get the idea that by laying down they get to quit for the day. They are almost as smart as dolphins which in a few short days can teach a flock of humans to throw them fish from the side of a pool.
 
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