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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been raising chickens for a few years now, and have plenty of eggs :) now I'm thinking about venturing into raising goats. I've had two goats growing up (but really just as pets). So I was wondering if there were any opinions about how to pair them. Should I get two females or a female and a wethered male?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Initially, I was thinking two females. Staggering them out so they aren't pregnant at the same time. But when I was at the farm looking at goats the farmer suggested F/wethered male because males make good pets for the kids and dealing with just one pregnant goat can be stressful. But he could have been just trying to sell his male babies :)

I guess potentially milking two goats can time consuming...
 

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Just an impression from reading other posts, a wether and doe pair will sometimes lead to undesirable results within the herd dynamics depending on the personalities involved. Even though a wether can't impregnant a doe, he may still be able to detect the heat cycles and could engage in annoying the female(s) with chasing and mounting behavior. Also, a wether can be a rough and tumble male when it comes to dominance over a female and naturally has an inherent desire to prove he is the "top goat" within the herd. There could be times when the wether would head butt, ram, and purposely try to intimidate the female(s), and possibly excessively so during certain times. Male goats will test their strength, sparing abilities, hierarchy and breeding rights with other males. If other males are not a part of the herd, the female(s) seem to take the brunt of the male behaviorism. Female goats also have a hierarchy within their herd and can/will display signs of dominance against each other very similar to what could be seen between males.

All this being said, a wether makes a wonderful pet hands down. The dynamics within a herd of males is much calmer than a mixed herd, and the males will test each other to establish the hierarchy. Male goats are better equipped to endure the tests of strength, ect., between each other "man to man" without the worry of potential harm to a female herd mate(s).
 

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Initially, I was thinking two females. Staggering them out so they aren't pregnant at the same time. But when I was at the farm looking at goats the farmer suggested F/wethered male because males make good pets for the kids and dealing with just one pregnant goat can be stressful. But he could have been just trying to sell his male babies :)

I guess potentially milking two goats can time consuming...
If possible, I would recommend visiting several goat breeders before making a decision.

Yes, I find every birth stressful, but I am not much more stressed with multiple does giving birth. But many (most) medical emergencies are associated with birth.

Milking goats is certainly a commitment. Most milk twice a day on a very regular schedule. When you consider the total effort required for milking, I doubt that it is much more work to milk two goats instead of one. Note: I have never milked goats (or any animals).

How are you planning to get your doe(s) pregnant if you decide to start milking? Buy a buck? Rent a buck? Take your doe to a buck?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@Mike at Capra Vista The plan is to take them somewhere. Have a few local farms that offer freshening services.
@Rancho Draco That's what I'm leaning towards too. I mean a wethered buck will be pretty much ornamental.

Visiting more breeders is great advice. I went to one breeder and I am almost certain their nigerian dwarfs are mix breeds. They just seem too big. I could be wrong but I expected them to be shorter based on what I read.

Thanks for the help everyone. Much appreciated.
 
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