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Discussion Starter #1
I’m really hoping to breed my Nigerian Dwarf goats this spring, and I know nothing of how I need to breed and prepare for the babies.
What are the things I need to know before breeding and what do I look for when they’re pregnant? Also, what do you all recommend to have on hand when it’s time for them to have their kids?
 

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To breed...just decide when you want kidds to be born. It takes about 5 months..or 140 to 150 days.
You will need a shelter for them to have kids in. Easy to clean, and able to.seperate the moms. I keep my moms & new wee ones separated from the herd for 2 to 3 days. Let them learn who is who.
I pull the buck away from all girls after he has been with them for 3 months. My bucks.live in a seperate.area. They only are part of the herd 3 months of the year.
There are several posts on kidding kits. Alot of really neat ideas on everything.
 

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When I first started goats I read a lot from Fias Co Farm. That's a good place to start.

In short to prepare before breeding: make sure goats are healthy and are in good condition.
Looking for when pregnant: are you asking for signs of pregnancy? Missing a heat cycle is a good way. You can blood test too. Growing an udder for first freshener. Getting very fat. Lol
Have a kidding stall. Fias Co Farm has a very extensive kidding kit list. I have one and I can post it tomorrow. I also like to have an area inside for kids if I have to bottle feed or it gets so cold outside that kids would be in danger.
 

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I would recommend getting the book, Holistic Goat Care by Gianaclis Caldwell. This book has been so helpful to me as a beginner. Even if you are not interested in holistic care, she really covers all aspects of health and general care, breeding, kidding etc. It goes over pretty much everything you need to know. It's easy to read, lots of pictures. ;) Read it cover to cover and you will be much better prepared.

There's so much to learn when raising goats that it would be impossible for us to tell you everything you need to do right in order to raise healthy goats. My best advice is to research as much as you can. Read old threads, watch YouTube videos and read books, and of course ask questions (which looks like you already gotten down (thumbup)). I've found it very helpful to keep a computer file of useful goat information so that whenever I find out something I want to remember, I just copy and paste it onto that document so that I will be able to find the information when I need it. Good luck to you in your goat raising adventures!
 

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As for my doe being old enough: I have one that is a little over a year old. Is that too young?
It really depends on her size. It's best to go by size and not age when first breeding. A good rule of thumb is for a doe to be at least 3/4 of the full size before being bred. A year though, is generally enough to achieve this.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would recommend getting the book, Holistic Goat Care by Gianaclis Caldwell. This book has been so helpful to me as a beginner. Even if you are not interested in holistic care, she really covers all aspects of health and general care, breeding, kidding etc. It goes over pretty much everything you need to know. It's easy to read, lots of pictures. ;) Read it cover to cover and you will be much better prepared.

There's so much to learn when raising goats that it would be impossible for us to tell you everything you need to do right in order to raise healthy goats. My best advice is to research as much as you can. Read old threads, watch YouTube videos and read books, and of course ask questions (which looks like you already gotten down (thumbup)). I've found it very helpful to keep a computer file of useful goat information so that whenever I find out something I want to remember, I just copy and paste it onto that document so that I will be able to find the information when I need it. Good luck to you in your goat raising adventures!
Thank you so much, MellonFriend! I will look into that book for sure!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Also for the breed - they are dairy goats - so you will need to try to get the best udders behind your herdsire - and will need to milk your does. Do a lot of tease arch and get your does tested for CAE/ if they are positive you will need to pull kids from birth and bottle feed
Okay, thank you so much for your help!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When I first started goats I read a lot from Fias Co Farm. That's a good place to start.

In short to prepare before breeding: make sure goats are healthy and are in good condition.
Looking for when pregnant: are you asking for signs of pregnancy? Missing a heat cycle is a good way. You can blood test too. Growing an udder for first freshener. Getting very fat. Lol
Have a kidding stall. Fias Co Farm has a very extensive kidding kit list. I have one and I can post it tomorrow. I also like to have an area inside for kids if I have to bottle feed or it gets so cold outside that kids would be in danger.
I would love that kidding list you use so that I can get the things I need before the kids arrive.
 

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I raise Nigerian Dwarfs too. I don’t breed my girls until they’re 18 months old. I’ve found they’re mature enough and big enough by then.
There’s a lot of information out there but a lot of it is outdated like Fiaso farm.
The Storey book on raising dairy goats is good. I find most of the best information is right here on TGS.
As far as preparing, before breeding I’d get a fecal to make sure your doe is worm and coccidia free. Trim up her hooves and make sure she’s single teated (in nigies you don’t want extras) make sure she’s got a good body score, not fat, not thin. Check for the big three CAE,CL, Johnies.
I take my girls on dates with the buck. When they’re showing signs of being in heat they go in for 24 hours, then 5 days later they’ll go in again if they’re showing heat signs again.
Wait 17-22 days to see if they’re in heat again if they are, back to the buck. If not, wait 10 days and pull blood for a pregnancy test if you want.
3 months after breeding, another fecal check.
4 th month, final hoof trim before kidding and CDT
4.5 month give calcium gummies and raspberry leaves daily and prep kidding kit.
4.75 months start pulling hair out from excitement And give one cup grain daily
5 months...happy kidding!
Day after kidding, worm if needed And start upping grain for milk production And play with kids :)
 
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