flooring in goat house

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by poppa goat, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. poppa goat

    poppa goat New Member

    2
    Dec 26, 2009
    I'm building a goat house, not sure what type of flooring to put down, In my chicken coop I put linolium down over plywood works great easy cleanup should I do the same for my goats?
     
  2. farmergal

    farmergal New Member

    519
    Jun 19, 2009
    Northern California
    Most people on the board seem to agree that dirt is best... supplemented with straw for the muddy or cold winter months. The difference between chickens and goats is pee :wink: and the pee would pool on the linoleum, leaving your goats wet and smelly!
     

  3. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    i really like dirt, absorbs easily.

    second would be wood flooring, I used that, but it does collect moisture, so...
     
  4. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I had no choice but to use wood because my barn location is on a hillside...too much water running and obviously uneven ground. I have plywood floors in "my" area of the shed as well as the kidding stalls, the main goat area is treated deck wood, with gaps between the boards to allow for drainage.
     
  5. nutmegfarm

    nutmegfarm New Member

    543
    Dec 22, 2009
    NE Ohio
    I have dirt and I like dirt :)
     
  6. 4kids

    4kids New Member

    844
    Jul 21, 2009
    We also have wood due to hill/ledge/ect... I hate it! I would much prefer dirt but the decking flooring is a good idea esp for drainage!
     
  7. poppa goat

    poppa goat New Member

    2
    Dec 26, 2009
    Dirt would be much less work but doesn't the dirt get a little ripe from all the urine that would build up? I'm starting the house this weekend so I will gladly take all ideas, thanks everyone Jim
     
  8. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    I use lime to keep the smell down.
     
  9. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    I'm a fan of wood. Only because I'm a freak about dirt. Here, the goats dig big holes in the dirt, and then when the rain comes it all turns to mud. Is it just my goats, or do they all like to undermine everything? LOL
     
  10. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I have dirt floors that I put down lime - them that sweet pdz, then pine shavings in the winter.... can't use cedar because of the chickens ..... with 17 does in 1 covered area, I only have to replace the bedding every 2 weeks, and just get the "berry piles" out daily.
     
  11. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    Allison, refresh my memory. Why can't chickens have the cedar shavings? It's poisonous to them isn't it?
     
  12. Shelly Borg

    Shelly Borg New Member

    361
    Nov 2, 2009
    Redding CA
    The fumes from ceder can hurt the lungs. Chickens as well as most small animals. I would think twice about putting goat kids on it too.
     
  13. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Yeppers - has to do with respitory issues. Not poisonous to eat or anything like that - just the fumes from them.
     
  14. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    I have wood and I like it...it is warm, dry, and relatively easy to clean. It cuts down on the work load because I don't need use bedding during warmer months--I just sweep up poops with a broom every day and the floor stays clean and dry.
     
  15. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    I like sand the best, my second choice would be dirt, third would be concrete with mats over it.
    beth
     
  16. redneck_acres

    redneck_acres New Member

    Oct 17, 2007
    Idaho
    I wouldn't recommend a wood floor-just dirt or sand as it helps for drainage and helps prevent mastitis to. We had a wood floor in our barn a few years back and kept having some mastitis issues-took the floor out and haven't had any since. You can put a layer of sawdust on the ground and then put some straw on top and sometimes that helps with the drainage a bit to.
     
  17. magilacudy

    magilacudy Member

    169
    Mar 18, 2009
    Ontario
    I put down screening, then dirt. I have no issues with smell in my barn at all. When stalls are cleaned out I sprinkle baking soda.
     
  18. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    I have 100 year old cement, easy to clean but I plan on putting stall matts over it to make it easier to clean.