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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I live in Florida and have three fun and sweet Pygmy Nigerian mix goats. Two are whethers and one little doe. They are happy, healthy and sweet pets.

Recently we took in a rescue goat. We were told he is nygerian. Although we are happy with our little goat family, we felt bad for this guy. He is a 7 mos old intack buck and has been living in this family’s bathroom without any other goats to interact with. The family did not have a lot of knowledge of goats. You can imagine the issues as his hormones started taking over. Thus they needed to find a more suitable home for him. He is in our pen now and we banded him last night. The smell was overbearing, and we thought settling him down will go along way to getting him to fit in happily.

1. He doesn’t seem to know how to interact with other goats, and prefers humans.

2. He only wants to eat the grain that he has been eating in previous home. He has nibbled half heartedly at the Timothy hay, and barely gives the brush that we bring them a sniff. Doesn’t want to graze at all like the other goats.

Any suggestions on how to rehabilitate this little guy are greatly appreciated.
 

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Hi,
I live in Florida and have three fun and sweet Pygmy Nigerian mix goats. Two are whethers and one little doe. They are happy, healthy and sweet pets.

Recently we took in a rescue goat. We were told he is nygerian. Although we are happy with our little goat family, we felt bad for this guy. He is a 7 mos old intack buck and has been living in this family's bathroom without any other goats to interact with. The family did not have a lot of knowledge of goats. You can imagine the issues as his hormones started taking over. Thus they needed to find a more suitable home for him. He is in our pen now and we banded him last night. The smell was overbearing, and we thought settling him down will go along way to getting him to fit in happily.

1. He doesn't seem to know how to interact with other goats, and prefers humans.

2. He only wants to eat the grain that he has been eating in previous home. He has nibbled half heartedly at the Timothy hay, and barely gives the brush that we bring them a sniff. Doesn't want to graze at all like the other goats.

Any suggestions on how to rehabilitate this little guy are greatly appreciated.
1. I think this is ok. We rescued a Nigerian mix almost a year ago who behaved similar. He lived in a tiny pen by himself and was starving. He only wanted to be with us and bleeted all night. After a few weeks he has two goat pals he walks around with. Just happened naturally.

2. I would slowly stop giving him grain. It is dangerous for whether, if you did not know already. You may want to limit grain intake daily. If he's hungry he will eat the brush/hay that you provide.

Just my opinion. I'm sure more knowledgeable and experienced goat parents will reply :)
 

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Separate the just banded buck from the doe for 1 month or he can get the doe preggo. Putting him in with a wether is OK.

It will take time for him to learn about being a goat, but he will. But he will still like human contact. Don't go out every time he yells out for you, just ignore him and let him go to the other goats.
You can say hi once in a while and go out to the grazing area with him and be there for a little while and see if he begins to nibble on the weeds ect. You can do this daily, he may not know how, if he was kept confined.
If he gets the taste for it and likes it, he may start to graze with the others on his own. He may be afraid to wonder out so if you are there with him, he will know it is safe.

What kind of hay did his previous owner feed him? If it is not timothy hay, I would get the kind he was eating, it is important to keep his feed ratio 2:1.
He needs calcium which is a little alfalfa hay or pellets. And phosphorus.

Just eating grain alone isn't good. Also make sure the wethers/bucks get ammonium chloride in their diet to prevent urinary stones. If you cannot get the 2:1 ratio right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your reply. I believe the former owner had offered timothy to him, but he was hand fed and she said “he doesn’t like the the hay”. So I believe she was mainly feeding him grain. We typically give our goats T&A mix. They get a small of grain in the evening. They also forage in the yard.

Your advice is much appreciated and gives us hope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1. I think this is ok. We rescued a Nigerian mix almost a year ago who behaved similar. He lived in a tiny pen by himself and was starving. He only wanted to be with us and bleeted all night. After a few weeks he has two goat pals he walks around with. Just happened naturally.

2. I would slowly stop giving him grain. It is dangerous for whether, if you did not know already. You may want to limit grain intake daily. If he's hungry he will eat the brush/hay that you provide.

Just my opinion. I'm sure more knowledgeable and experienced goat parents will reply :)
Thank you.
 

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You've gotten really good replies, so you may not need mine. Replace your hay. Timothy is good hay for horses, but not excellent for goats (like I can be choosy? No.) Cut out the grain. It is candy, and high in phosphorus (as is Timothy) This could lead to UC problems. Alfalfa/grass mix hay is best for them.

Basically this is a child who has learned he only has to eat candy and donuts, and never has to eat his vegetables.

Are your other goats willing to eat their vegetables? They will teach him. Especially when he gets hungry enough. Toth Boer Goats is correct about keeping him away from the doe, he is still fertile for a while. But putting him with one of the wethers will teach him about being a goat and making friends faster than leaving him completely alone. So that is what I would do, keep one wether with the doe and one wether with your new boy.

He is lucky to have you. Great job taking him in.
 

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Some people in Florida have trouble finding alfalfa. They use another legume hay, Peanut hay, So if alfalfa is difficult, try peanut?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey thanks.
Some people in Florida have trouble finding alfalfa. They use another legume hay, Peanut hay, So if alfalfa is difficult, try peanut?
The more
You've gotten really good replies, so you may not need mine. Replace your hay. Timothy is good hay for horses, but not excellent for goats (like I can be choosy? No.) Cut out the grain. It is candy, and high in phosphorus (as is Timothy) This could lead to UC problems. Alfalfa/grass mix hay is best for them.

Basically this is a child who has learned he only has to eat candy and donuts, and never has to eat his vegetables.

Are your other goats willing to eat their vegetables? They will teach him. Especially when he gets hungry enough. Toth Boer Goats is correct about keeping him away from the doe, he is still fertile for a while. But putting him with one of the wethers will teach him about being a goat and making friends faster than leaving him completely alone. So that is what I would do, keep one wether with the doe and one wether with your new boy.

He is lucky to have you. Great job taking him in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks. Can never have too much advice if’s it’s good advice. :) Our other three goats LOVE their veggies. The hay we typically feed them is a mix of Timothy and alfalfa. Sadly peanut hay is next to impossible to come by in South Florida. We were able to get our hands on some in the past and our goats loved it. At any rate, we will be weaning this new guy off the junk food now. He has slowed down a bit since being banded. Also a little less trusting of us two legged types. I’m guessing he’s feeling a bit tender. :dazed:

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update. Bolt our new rescue goat is gradually adjusting. He is eating the hay AND leaves from the branches I bring them. He would still prefer grain of course. But that is being kept to a minimum. He is a bit more dainty of an eater than the other goats. Slower and smaller bites. I guess he’ll learn to get in there before anyone else eats it up.
 

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Nothing teaches a goat better than another goat. He looks great. Well done.
 
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