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Hello all. I'm back here after ages! Last few months have been hectic..what with exams, a surprise outbreak of FMD and finally, a welcome vacation.
My herd recently experienced a thankfully mild out break of foot and mouth disease ( FMD), and I thought I'd make a post on how I managed it..incase it helps someone going through a similar problem. I read that it doesn't happen in the US anymore, but outbreaks are still common in many countries like here in Bangladesh. There is a vaccine, but it wasn't available in my district; whoever lives in a vulnerable area, please try to vaccinate your herd...don't be negligent like me!
The disease is most common in winter, and thats what happened in my case...I hadn't brought any new goats but it still slipped into my home( I suspect from the farmers market, from where my household groceries are brought, as livestock is often brought there to butcher)
The virus affected only 2 of my 7 goats...others might have been asymptomatic ( I'm not sure)...I'm extremely thankful to have got by so easily. The affected two were Talitha's triplet brother and sister, who lives together in a separate shed. They had the classic symptoms; lesions inside the mouth which caused excessive drooling, blisters and sores around the hoof band, fever, not eating out of pain.
The vet was called; he gave two pieces of bad news: 1) this was a virus so it could only be allowed to run its course 2) he had been transferred to the village district and there was no replacement livestock vet yet
Thankfully..it's not usually a fatal condition but does cause deaths in young/ immune compromised animals, abortions in pregnant does or possible permanent lameness. Also, not eating could make the animal even sicker. Both Capella and Caspian are young, so I was rather worried. I separated them, forbade anyone from coming to their shed, made sure anyone helping me washed their hands and feet. They were tethered in the field while the others stayed in the dry lot. Their shed was washed with soap every day.
Though Caspian had a low grade fever, I decided to go with my gut and not use antibiotics just yet. Anyways, it wouldn't really help against the virus. Our village folk have come up with some brilliant home remedies for their cattle when suffering from FMD( locally known as 'baat jor').. which includes coconut oil mixed with grinded herbs and turmeric to soothe the sores, feeding the animals warm softened bran with turmeric, black cumin, molasses and orsaline( a widely available electrolyte mix for humans). These are known to hasten the healing process. I decided to put these to use with some additional treatments+ the basic vitamin b complex+probios supportive care. Also, I used 2 drops of tea tree oil per tsp coconut oil for the salve, and also fed garlic, ginger powder, cinnamon powder, acv and two drops of oregano oil per quart of electrolytes via syringe. ( You might have to stomach tube/ give sq fluids to a sicker goat). Black cumin( nigella sativa) oil is also a wonderful antiviral; I mixed in 1 TSP per 1/2 quart electrolyte.
Basically, I threw everything at them that I thought would help : P
I don't know which helped the most but the sores cleared up within 2 weeks and noone else have shown any symptoms till now. The fever is gone and they're eating normally. (The disease usually takes 1-2 months to clear up without treatment). I guess something did work!
Lastly, an important disclaimer: I'm obviously not a vet and don't claim to be...please please get any sick goat checked up by a professional if at all possible
Also, be careful with herbs and home remedies and use them in moderation...as far as I know, tumeric oregano and black cumin are blood thinners and are not very safe for pregnant goats.... cinnamon,ginger, garlic and acv are safe IN MODERATION.
Look up herbs/spices or ask someone knowledgeable just to be sure.
Finally.. many thanks to anyone who patiently read through this whole thing...I certainly hope it helps someone.
Suggestions/ criticism/corrections are welcome from all knowledgeable members of this forum:)
 

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Wow! You certainly did all you could for your goats! Here in the USA, it is reportable, (considered a bioterror threat) and the entire herd would be put to death, then they would track all the surrounding herds. Fortunately, no reported outbreaks since 1929!
I hope that we never need to use your knowledge! But, thanks so much for posting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Wow...I didn't know there are such serious culling measures for this there!
In here village farmers usually have few animals, often they are also family milkers, have names and are sort of pets so they try their best to treat....I believe most commercial farms here slaughter sick animals too.
 

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Thankyou for all your information. I appreciate all your efforts. I do hope all your goats recover completely and you have no.more health problems. Take care.
 

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Amazing! I am so impressed, especially that it was all natural treatments. Good job getting your 2 youngsters through it so quickly and writing it all up for us!
:ty:
 
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