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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
that sounded funny. Anyways, I decided to do a CAE prevention this year and needed colostrum because I dident have any pasturized in the freezer. Go to your health food store and get Colostrum powder, yes meant for humans. But it is Bovine colostrum here is what is says. 20% Immunoglobulins, New Zealand Source..on the back

The colostrum is obtained from the cow within 48 hours of calving and is processed in New Zealand under a fully implemented HACCP( Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) program. BSE ( Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) is not known to exist in New Zealand. Each serving features 20% immunoglobulins, which includes all four of the key immunoglobulins: IgG, IgA and seretary IgA. This concentration of nutrients is intended to provide nutritive support for general health and well-being.


So let me know what you all think??? a serving for a human is only a teaspoon!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My freind is the Manager at the health food store that I get this from. She said that these big companies that produce stuff like this want these animals tested for every single disease known to man. They make sure that there are no diseases or anything like that from these cows because the all natural people have to have all natural cows and they dont want the diseases in the supplements and stuff that they eat. What about all the people on here who feed their bottle babies whole cows milk??? I feed whole cows milk. What about Johnes disease, I thought pasturizing did kill it.
 

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No, Johnes is not killed by pasturization. I don't feed whole cows milk from the store just because I don't know what the cows had or what they were given medication wise. Johnes is very prevalent in dairy herds, most cows are carriers of the disease, but not many will show up with signs of the disease. Johnes testing is very inaccurate, since the only way for an animal to test positive is if they are shedding the antibodies(I don't think thats the right word) at the time of testing. Otherwise, a positive animal that is a carrier for Johnes will test negative.

Now, I know that a lot of people have been feeding bottle babies with store bought milk and never had a problem, but I personally wouldn't use it on my kids.
 

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Sarah out of curiosity, what would you use if you didn't have access to goats milk? I am getting a bottle baby so I want to know what to feed her.
 

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We've always had goat milk around so that was never a problem :wink: But, when we didn't have it, we would go around asking breeders for milk, and when they didn't have any we got Purina milk replacer, which is a really good replacer.
 

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Well with the number of breeders out there using cows milk all the time to feed orphaned kids the chances of Johnes can't be that high - but thats just my oppion
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I mean everyone is going to do it there way, and I agree with stacey, I know soooooo many people who use whole cows milk, SOO many people I mean besides using goats milk I knew that people that used whole coes milk, no one uses replacer around here because we have had nothing but problems with it. So since the tests are soo inacurate, and all these big breeders are running around saying they are Johnes free, may not be johnes free.
 

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now how long does it take for a johnes postive goat to start showing symptoms? That would be a way to know if you have Johnes in your herd or not (not a fun way but it would elimiate the need to wonder, ok this isnt coming out right)
 

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Well goats usually exhibit symptoms of Johnes around 2-3 years of age, but even if they are showing symptoms they can still test negative because the body is not passing anti bodies in the feces.

Like I said, its a personal choice, I know there are a lot of people who feed whole cows milk, but I'm just saying that I wouldn't do it :wink:
 

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goathappy said:
We've always had goat milk around so that was never a problem :wink: But, when we didn't have it, we would go around asking breeders for milk, and when they didn't have any we got Purina milk replacer, which is a really good replacer.
You do understand that milk replacer no matter what species it is made for is made from cows milk.
 

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I guess it was peace of mind for me. Like I said, we always have goat milk around so I usually don't have to worry about replacers or anything. It seems like somebody makes a goat milk based replacer though, I can't think of the name though.
 
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