Freak accident with doe..need help ASAP!

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Amelia Barfield, Jan 26, 2020.

  1. SandyNubians

    SandyNubians Well-Known Member

    Feb 18, 2017
    Idaho
    That is great to hear that she is doing better. I hope she will be back to 100% soon!
     
    Moers kiko boars likes this.
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California

  3. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Good Job!! Yes God is very good!!
     
  4. omeomy07

    omeomy07 Active Member

    128
    Oct 28, 2017
    Georgia
    i'm so happy to hear your doe is doing better! for the future, though- what part of georgia are you in? i can ask my vet in Bowdon if any of their vet school friends are working in your area/if they know any vets that'll see goats near you.
     
    MadHouse likes this.
  5. Amelia Barfield

    Amelia Barfield Member

    7
    Jan 26, 2020
    Georgia
    I’m in Dallas so not too awful far from you. I did call a vets office know bowdon and in Carrollton. Bowdon never got back to me and Carrollton seemed like they were going to help and then I never heard back. I ended up having a goat in labor yesterday that was struggling (it’s been a crazy few weeks here) so I called Carrollton hoping to get some advice and they said they would get back..again never heard anything. ‍♀️
     
    MadHouse likes this.
  6. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    Im in North GA, We have a travelling doctor her, Dr. Milligan. She is awesome and texted with me to help out with some questions. Glad she's doing good though :)
     
  7. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    It's too bad you couldn't get a vet but I'm glad your doe is doing better. I hope she continues to improve.

    I recommend trying to establish a relationship with a vet during a non-emergency so they will be there for you when things like this happen. A lot of vets just won't see an animal for the first time if it's an emergency, but it doesn't necessarily make them a bad or uncaring vet. I'm guessing it's because there is a higher percentage of people who call a vet only in emergencies, whose animals may only be marginally cared for, and who don't pay (or don't pay on time). This kind of thing makes it hard for the rest of us who are good folks but may not have had a reason to call a vet until an emergency.
     
  8. alicejane

    alicejane Active Member

    251
    Jan 15, 2014
    Also just wanted to remind about heat lamps. I have always attached two separate places on a heat lamp
    To insure it cannot drop to ground. I hook it to secure walls anything goats cannot knock down. Also I attach a screen type wire over bottom of lamp so if the blub breaks it won't hit baby. Provide some heat but no fire. I have use lamps with chickens & they always need to climb on top of lamps. Thanks
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  9. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    YES YES YES YES YES. I have mine hung over a rafter, wrapped twice, with a clamp.
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  10. omeomy07

    omeomy07 Active Member

    128
    Oct 28, 2017
    Georgia
    So Bremen sees large animals too, but I went once and won't go again. Bowdons large animal techs might take a few days to get back to you. I've only gone to Carroll county for emergency cat visits.

    The vets at bowdon will most likely do farm calls for you. They came to me when I was in Temple and I did a farm call so they could just establish a relationship with the goats (so I could get scripts) and vaccinated my cats.

    It's super annoying to not just get a tech/scheduler when you call the main office number, but I'd still recommend Bowdon. I'm currently staying about 10 min from them, so if you ever need me to, I can always walk in and try to get one of the large animal vets in person.
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with the others.

    Good to hear she will be OK. :goodjob:
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  12. Treva Brodt

    Treva Brodt Well-Known Member

    234
    Jan 10, 2019
    West Union, Ohio
    That would be a deadly mistake. There’s a difference between molecular oxygen for welding and O2 for breathing.
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  13. artzkat

    artzkat Member

    173
    Oct 22, 2007
    West Virginia
    You did amazing! Do keep up the supportive care for momma...she is still at risk for pneumonia..the B12 or a fortified multivitamin is good and still some oxygen too, if possible. As odd as it sounds there is a website, Justanswer.com that is available 24 hrs a day to give human and animal (vet)advice on line. If nothing else they can tell you where to get oxygen etc, or maybe even help you find a local vet for another emergency...and you do need to have some RX meds on hand like banamine, that you need a prescription from a vet for. You are in Georgia?..now that things are calming down a little, call the ag school there and find out how, who and where the local livestock vets are. I found my goat vet by calling the local race track! go figure.
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  14. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    How is your doe? Did she ever get a vet check for her lungs?
     
    MadHouse likes this.
  15. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Not true, the difference is in the custody chain of the tanks NOT in the oxygen itself.
    If you don't believe me you can run down to your local airgas supply and ask the paramedics that are there refilling their medical tanks on a regular basis
    Buying a brand new tank and using it only for medical use keeps your tank from getting back vaped by impurities.
     
    Treva Brodt, GoofyGoat and Iluvlilly! like this.
  16. artzkat

    artzkat Member

    173
    Oct 22, 2007
    West Virginia
    All still well? I live in a verrrrry rural area but do have a few farm vets..one that does ONLY mobile calls...but I was chatting with a local volunteer fireman who suggested that you can always call the FD and ask for help..In fact when you first had the smoking hay/straw you could have called them, told them you had livestock that needed assistance and they will come. He told me that just a few days ago, they had the same scenario and had to give a barn cat cpr and O2. Sometimes help is where we least think to look for it.
     
  17. Treva Brodt

    Treva Brodt Well-Known Member

    234
    Jan 10, 2019
    West Union, Ohio
    Oops! I was just going by what my husband said about O2 tanks for welding. He was a welder by trade and taught welding school for years. I took his word for it.
     
    Moers kiko boars likes this.
  18. Treva Brodt

    Treva Brodt Well-Known Member

    234
    Jan 10, 2019
    West Union, Ohio
    I'm the first to admit when I make a mistake and thanks to all who have kindly set me straight. I was thinking about the difference between atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. This little snippet I have copied and pasted is what I was thinking of and it seems there is no way atomic oxygen could be used for welding either. Idk what my husband was thinking when we were talking about using the oxygen in a welding tank in case of emergency. He probably wasn't really listening to me (imagine that)!

    What would happen if you breathed single oxygen atoms (O) rather than molecules (O2)?
    You would die an agonizing death.

    Atomic oxygen is horribly reactive stuff. When you breathe molecular oxygen (O2) it passes through your nose, down into your lungs, and gets picked up by your red blood cells. It reacts only negligibly with those tissues. Then, your red blood cells carry it around your body to other cells which subsequently metabolize with it. Again, the O2 mostly just goes along for the ride until your body uses it for respiration.

    Atomic oxygen isn’t so forgiving. For starters, you’ll never get atomic oxygen into your bloodstream - it will react with your nose, your lungs, your blood, and itself long before you get a chance to get it to your cells. So you’re going to asphyxiate if all you’ve got is atomic oxygen to breathe.

    That’s a mercy, because the short remainder of your conscious existence will be horrific. The atomic oxygen will react with your skin, your eyes, and particularly your mucus membranes producing very irritating chemicals (like hydrogen peroxide) and an enormous amount of heat. This heat will burn these tissues while the chemicals burn these tissues. Additionally, the atomic oxygen will react with itself to form molecular oxygen and liberate even more heat. This hot molecular oxygen will burn your hair, clothing, and skin, turning you into a writhing fireball.

    You’ll only get about 15 seconds to experience that before you black out and char.

    Pleasant dreams…















    11 Answers
    [​IMG]
    Dave Consiglio
    , I have been a science teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.
    Answered Jan 11, 2017 · Upvoted by Teresa Gemellaro, B. Sc majoring in Chemistry, Chemistry teacher, Chemistry text author and Aditya Puranik, PhD Chemistry, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda (2020)

    Originally Answered: What would happen if you breathed single Oxygen atoms (O) rather than molecules (O2)?
    You would die an agonizing death.

    Atomic oxygen is horribly reactive stuff. When you breathe molecular oxygen (O2) it passes through your nose, down into your lungs, and gets picked up by your red blood cells. It reacts only negligibly with those tissues. Then, your red blood cells carry it around your body to other cells which subsequently metabolize with it. Again, the O2 mostly just goes along for the ride until your body uses it for respiration.

    Atomic oxygen isn’t so forgiving. For starters, you’ll never get atomic oxygen into your bloodstream - it will react with your nose, your lungs, your blood, and itself long before you get a chance to get it to your cells. So you’re going to asphyxiate if all you’ve got is atomic oxygen to breathe.

    That’s a mercy, because the short remainder of your conscious existence will be horrific. The atomic oxygen will react with your skin, your eyes, and particularly your mucus membranes producing very irritating chemicals (like hydrogen peroxide) and an enormous amount of heat. This heat will burn these tissues while the chemicals burn these tissues. Additionally, the atomic oxygen will react with itself to form molecular oxygen and liberate even more heat. This hot molecular oxygen will burn your hair, clothing, and skin, turning you into a writhing fireball.

    You’ll only get about 15 seconds to experience that before you black out and char.

    Pleasant dreams…
     
  19. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Thanks for not taking that as snipey, it wasn't meant to be.
    I was trying to figure out what was going on because the truck driver who fills the tanks at DH's shop also fills the tanks at the hospital on his route.
     
    Moers kiko boars and GoofyGoat like this.
  20. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England