Freezing milk in plastic?????

Discussion in 'Cookin' Corner' started by liz, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Hey, I've done this for years but have now been notified that I shouldn't be doing it....the plastic causes some sort of health risk? Anyone have info on this?, please share it. Thanks Bunches
     
  2. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    I do it to. If you put it in bottles and they get tight and swell then the plastic is said to release some kind of hydrocarbon into the milk or whatever you are freezing. I use the rubbermaid tupperware stuff to freeze then I move the milk to freezer bags. If its gonna kill me I cant tell :shrug:
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    supposibily any plastic can leak into what you have in it or under it (plastic wrap over food in microwave).

    My friends mom always yells at us when we microwave our food in the plastic containers for left overs. Its the same idea.

    But if you freeze your veggies in plastic and your meat etc whats the difference with milk :shrug:
     
  4. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    See, thats what I was wondering, I have a friend thats been taking any excess I have but has told me about the plastic, anyhow, she offered to get 2 qt glass for me to freeze in for her...as long as I don't end up with busted jugs in my freezer I don't mind...but as far as I know we haven't had any ill effects from the plastic.
     
  5. Lawanda

    Lawanda New Member

    694
    Jun 11, 2009
    West Virginia
    I think it is one of those things that will kill you when you are almost 80 ;) It seems like everything causes cancer nowadays :roll: I wouldn't worry about it, personally, but it is really nice of you to be considerate of her wanting it in glass, though!! :)
     
  6. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    To freeze it in glass just fill it to about an inch from the top and leave the lid a bit loose till it freezes.
     
  7. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Guees what? I tried to freeze milk in a pint and a quart mason jar...no lids and left 1 inch head space...Both cracked. I had to pitch that precious milk because I feared glass shards.

    I did EXTENSIVE research on the "bad" things in plastics...it seems that a chemical called BPA is the reason behind the paranoia, and the recycling triangle on most plastics has a number in it...with a letter code under that and I found that a #2 as well as HDPE ...High Density PolyEthylene is a "safe" type of plastic.....so if these 2 qt glass bottles the lady wants me to try do not work then I can "recycle" the 2 qt milk jugs from the restaraunt I work in to use for freezing.
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    wow Liz... it is good to know about the different plastic letter codes....thanks for letting us know...........it is greatly appreciated.... :greengrin:

    The glass broke.. how awful... :( ....I am sorry ....that happened...... :greengrin:
     
  9. Lawanda

    Lawanda New Member

    694
    Jun 11, 2009
    West Virginia
    That stinks about having to throw it away :( Plastic baggies are recommended for human breastmilk, maybe that'd be an idea as well?
     
  10. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I thot the same thing about using the bags, but, so far so good....excellent results with freezing in the glass 2 qt jugs :wink:
     
  11. Lawanda

    Lawanda New Member

    694
    Jun 11, 2009
    West Virginia
    That's good!! :)
     
  12. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    If the jar is a wide mout then it should not crack if its one of the small mouthed ones then as the milk freezes it will crack the glass.
     
  13. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Well....I have had success with 3, the 4th broke BUT it was after I put the lid on it after the milk was frozen.

    Though these bottles will hold 8 cups, I am putting 7 cups in them to allow for expansion, this is giving them 2 inches of space, the problem with the 4th one was that I added 3/4 cup to the already frozen and it was too much....oh well, my friend knew that this would be "trial and error" with the glass.
     
  14. Shantarskiye

    Shantarskiye Member

    62
    Apr 15, 2009
    Indiana
    ?????

    I hope it's okay...because I've been doing it for a long time! :shrug:
     
  15. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I still use the plastic juice bottles for my use, but after doing alot of research, I freeze the milk in 1 qt ziploc bags for my friend......appeases her fears and they're stackable...free's up space in my freezer :wink:
     
  16. Well, I know what you are talking about but everyone I knows freezes in plastc. I mean think about how much food you buy in plastic, or ice pops, and so on. I think it's like french fries, they casue cancer as with everything else but its such little risk, lets keep it on the market. :roll:
     
  17. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    The plastics that were questioned were those that possibly contained "BPA" most products that have used this are now changed, it has ironically been used most often in the feeding products for infants, bottles, sippy cups etc. By law, the offending "BPA" can no longer be added to plastics that are used for food. Most plastics used for food storage are made from either "LDPE" or "HDPE".....Low and High Density PolyEthylene.....the low being used to make storage bags and the high for more rigid packaging like milk jugs, and food storage containers.
     
  18. Shantarskiye

    Shantarskiye Member

    62
    Apr 15, 2009
    Indiana
    :doh:

    That sounds like a great idea!
     
  19. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    The average person gets far more BPA exposure from canned goods and soda pop cans than they do from plastic containers...from the lining used in the can to keep the food/pop from having a metallic taste. And as far as I know NOTHING has been done to find an alternative can lining. Oh, well... :shrug:

    The thing with BPA is that it is a so-called endocrine disrupter. There have been studies linking it to early puberty in girls and low testosterone levels in boys. Of course, studies can be designed to show anything researchers want these days...Not sure if the BPA levels the average person is exposed to is enough to cause any significant problem.
     
  20. thephatlady

    thephatlady New Member

    14
    Jul 28, 2009
    Mason used to make quart sized freezer jars, we used them for making freezer jelly several years back.Maybe they still make them.