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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are having a bought of extreme cold weather. (supposed to be -30 or lower tonight).

4 year old Lamancha doe- pregnant (2 months along)

Ate normally last night, this morning refused to leave her shelter with her buddy for grain and hay. Totally not normal for her, she's a piggy.

Added extra straw for warmth. Vit B plus shot. Dyne "drench". Offered hay and warm molasses water- refused both. She was drenched with the warm water for the sugary energy and the warmth and hydration.

Stayed the same, refused her supper. I gave my son and DIL directions on what to do, left more Vit B loaded in the syringe, more Dyne and add cayenne pepper to her molasses drench.

I am at work. Son just called to say she was down, inside of her mouth was cold and she looked like she was seizing. He now has her in the main barn with her buddy, got the hair drier going on her, hot water "bottles" under arm pits and whatever you call the pits on the back legs. I told him to get the silver emergency "space" blanket to cover her with while they got her warmed up.

She has no signs of polio or listeria, I checked for that right off. No bloating.

My son just called with an update. She is up and walking around and is warming up. I told him to continue with the water/sugar/cayenne and add warm strong coffee. They added a heavy blanket under her space blanket. She is refusing to eat still, not even her goat treats, donuts or cookies, which she will usually kill to get a bite of.

Figures it would happen on my first night back to work. And, it's supposed to get down to -40 tonight.
 

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Oh no! I had something very similar happen once, and built up a little 'pen' of hay bales to keep away the drafts. I also used a heat light, but that is always a fire risk, so if you do use one, I'm sure you know to be very careful.
She might need a coat or blanket to wear.
Any fresh forage options might tempt her appetite.
Does she have a buddy to snuggle and keep warm with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No electricity in the barn unless someone is there, so no heat lamp. She has a blanket plus the space blanket on. She has her pen mate plus 2 yearlings running loose in the barn because of the weather right now. My barn will be in tatters by morning!

Forage in Maine during the winter is pretty much non-existent except for pine out in the woods. She is not a huge pine fan, but has been offered donuts and cookies, which she refused. There is water with molasses and flakes of hay down for her and the other 3.
 

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What is her temp?
Need to monitor that.

Her rumen may of shutdown, or not healthy. Listen to her left side(rumen), any good sounds /movement?

Give probiotics, cud transfer if possible and a big dose, SQ fortified vit b complex, 2 x a day for at least 3 days or longer if you have to.

No grain, while she is not eating.
She may of ate too much grain or something and her rumen went off.

Make her a alfalfa pellet slurry with water and slowly drench her. Start out with 1/4 cup pellets and make it to where it will go through a new turkey baster or huge syringe.
Feed Hera new batch each time about every couple of hours.

She won’t keep her temp with no food(roughage) in her.

Give her electrolytes as well, drench her slowly, if she won’t drink it.
Make sure her head isn’t too high when drenching, so you don’t get it into her lungs.

Keep her in a warm area.

Watch for pneumonia.
 

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To tempt her to eat you could try twigs with buds on them. My goats love them.
I hope she starts eating and gets herself warmed up.
 

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We've never been that cold in Oregon but when we're below freezing during kidding, I will make a little cave out of bails or flakes kind of in a U-shape so there's absolutely no draft. We don't have power in any of our goat houses so heat lamps aren't an option, not that I would use one anyway. You know those little instant hand warmers? They make body warmers as well. They're much bigger like to put up your shirt. I get several of those. It's great if you can find the reusable type. I put them under a towel so they don't get nibbled. Under that I use the self warming dog beds/pads. I think they're just lined with the same stuff that space blankets are made out of but actually stay warm by reflecting heat back at the animal (I'vesat on one to test them -- they work well). Then I just take lots of warm water out on the regular. It also works to put one of the hand warmers under a small thing of warm water to keep it from freezing.

It's possible she's too cold to eat right now. Hopefully she eats once she's warmed up more. Are they able to get a temperature on her?
 

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We've never been that cold in Oregon but when we're below freezing during kidding, I will make a little cave out of bails or flakes kind of in a U-shape so there's absolutely no draft. We don't have power in any of our goat houses so heat lamps aren't an option, not that I would use one anyway. You know those little instant hand warmers? They make body warmers as well. They're much bigger like to put up your shirt. I get several of those. It's great if you can find the reusable type. I put them under a towel so they don't get nibbled. Under that I use the self warming dog beds/pads. I think they're just lined with the same stuff that space blankets are made out of but actually stay warm by reflecting heat back at the animal (I'vesat on one to test them -- they work well). Then I just take lots of warm water out on the regular. It also works to put one of the hand warmers under a small thing of warm water to keep it from freezing.

It's possible she's too cold to eat right now. Hopefully she eats once she's warmed up more. Are they able to get a temperature on her?
You can also use those microwavable heating pads for dog or cat beds they work really well. I have the barrels with the 125 w bulbs in them not heat lamps I won't use those too dangerous.
 

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@lottsagoats1 how's your doe? Hows her temp? Definitely need to work her rumen. Dark beer and probiotics help. Keep up the cayenne pepper in her drench. B complex as a support.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
She's all better. I walked in the barn this morning to find utter chaos. 2 yearling does and the 2 mature does running amok, empty feed bags scattered all over the floor, buckets up side down, baling twine and trash from the feed bag trash bag dragged all over the floor. The doe that had hypothermia was standing on the milk stand covered in baling twine, looking like a red neck Christmas tree, waiting for breakfast. She ate her breakfast and is her normal obnoxious self. All 4 were put back into their pens for the day and will come in again tonight. The weather will return to normal by late tomorrow, just in time for a major storm. LOL Gotta love Maine.

She also ate her supper tonight, or was eating it anyway, as I left for work. They get fed at 0730, 1700 and 2200 on my work days (Friday at 1900 through Tuesday at 0700) and 0730, 1430 and 2300 on my days off. When it's bitter cold like it has been, they get an extra hay feeding around 0230. In 40 years of raising goats in New England, this doe was the first one I've had that suffered from the cold, not counting newborns, and we've had much colder than what we had yesterday.

No thermometer, the puppy ate it, but last night her mouth was cold, she was flat out and lethargic. The molasses, water, double brewed Death Wish coffee and cayenne got her going along with the space blanket, and this morning she was chasing the yearlings around the barn before I could get them back to their separate pens.

Since Cado is my sons goat, and I am at work, he will be checking on her throughout the night. I don't foresee any issues like yesterday, since she is eating her hay, hay pellets and dairy pellets like the pig she usually is. She refused to eat yesterday, which is why she got so cold...nothing in her rumen to keep her warm.

No electricity in the barn unless we are in the barn, and Cado is way too big for a barrel anyway, as she goes about 150 pounds. The power is fed from the back porch and shut off as soon as we are done in the barn.

I use 20 oz soda bottles filled with hot water covered in an old wool sock as a heat source.

The shed in their pens are made for 2 goats, open to the south and are stuffed with straw on top of kiln dried pine shavings. The other 3 were actually fine, it was just this one doe got chilled when she stopped eating and then just got way too cold to eat as the temp. dropped and the wind picked up.

She had not eaten grain since Thursday morning, as they only get it once a day, in the morning, and she refused to eat Friday morning at 0730 before the massive temp change. She was fine Friday morning at 0100 when I finished up night chores, out eating her hay with her buddy Kimmi.
 

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So glad that she is doing better. Sometimes, in sudden extreme cold, they shiver so much, they go into a negative energy thing, they are shivering off
their minerals and calcium, etc. (I am not explaining well, sorry). Anyway, extra sugar can help bring her back. (It isn't exactly ketosis, but like it).
 

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I am so glad! That was scary!
 

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So glad that she is doing better. Sometimes, in sudden extreme cold, they shiver so much, they go into a negative energy thing, they are shivering off
their minerals and calcium, etc. (I am not explaining well, sorry). Anyway, extra sugar can help bring her back. (It isn't exactly ketosis, but like it).
So how do you address that if it starts? We don't get as cold as Maine here in Missouri but we have other issues though we were down in the 24 below zero or a little lower for a week last February. Our biggest problem here is the DraStic temperature changes that we get. A couple years ago in January it was 70° and sunny in the morning and we went through rain sleet snow and then had ice and -5 by dark. So I sometimes have trouble with my animals adjusting to the temperature swings. And we go up and down this time of year will have really nice days in the 50s and then it'll be single digits or below zero and they have a lot of trouble adjusting and I can identify it's hard as a person to do it too and I can go inside.
She's all better. I walked in the barn this morning to find utter chaos. 2 yearling does and the 2 mature does running amok, empty feed bags scattered all over the floor, buckets up side down, baling twine and trash from the feed bag trash bag dragged all over the floor. The doe that had hypothermia was standing on the milk stand covered in baling twine, looking like a red neck Christmas tree, waiting for breakfast. She ate her breakfast and is her normal obnoxious self. All 4 were put back into their pens for the day and will come in again tonight. The weather will return to normal by late tomorrow, just in time for a major storm. LOL Gotta love Maine.

She also ate her supper tonight, or was eating it anyway, as I left for work. They get fed at 0730, 1700 and 2200 on my work days (Friday at 1900 through Tuesday at 0700) and 0730, 1430 and 2300 on my days off. When it's bitter cold like it has been, they get an extra hay feeding around 0230. In 40 years of raising goats in New England, this doe was the first one I've had that suffered from the cold, not counting newborns, and we've had much colder than what we had yesterday.

No thermometer, the puppy ate it, but last night her mouth was cold, she was flat out and lethargic. The molasses, water, double brewed Death Wish coffee and cayenne got her going along with the space blanket, and this morning she was chasing the yearlings around the barn before I could get them back to their separate pens.

Since Cado is my sons goat, and I am at work, he will be checking on her throughout the night. I don't foresee any issues like yesterday, since she is eating her hay, hay pellets and dairy pellets like the pig she usually is. She refused to eat yesterday, which is why she got so cold...nothing in her rumen to keep her warm.

No electricity in the barn unless we are in the barn, and Cado is way too big for a barrel anyway, as she goes about 150 pounds. The power is fed from the back porch and shut off as soon as we are done in the barn.

I use 20 oz soda bottles filled with hot water covered in an old wool sock as a heat source.

The shed in their pens are made for 2 goats, open to the south and are stuffed with straw on top of kiln dried pine shavings. The other 3 were actually fine, it was just this one doe got chilled when she stopped eating and then just got way too cold to eat as the temp. dropped and the wind picked up.

She had not eaten grain since Thursday morning, as they only get it once a day, in the morning, and she refused to eat Friday morning at 0730 before the massive temp change. She was fine Friday morning at 0100 when I finished up night chores, out eating her hay with her buddy Kimmi.
So glad to hear she's doing well. Always glad to get an extra information too on how you deal with the cold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This is the first time I have had this issue in 40 years of goats, usually they do just fine in the cold. We do have huge temp swings up here, too. -30 with the wind chill the past 2 days. Monday up in the 40's with rain and snow. LOL, then back to the 20's and down to the single digits again. The weather in New England is usually chaotic and all over the place, but this year has been way worse than normal.

I just keep them on a balanced diet, lots of hay and make sure they get exercise outside every day. I think most dairy goats do better in the cold than the heat, while meat goats do better in the heat than cold!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, Cado lost her kids, most likely due to her issues last week. Was hoping that would not happen, but not surprised it did. When her temp dropped, I'm sure it caused some problems for her unborn kids. There's always next year I guess.
 
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