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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I have been corcheting for years, but these past couple months I have been getting into handspinning and want to get into getting fiber producing goats. This little yearling pygora doe just popped up for sale, so I started reading up on the care of angoras and angora crosses care. So any tips? For her diet would alfalfa, brush (black berry bushes and a couple other plants), and grass hay work? Are there any supplements that I should give her that would help with producing mohair?
 

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Oh, I'm so jealous! Look at that little face.:inlove: I don't really have any advice from experience, but I've heard that you need to make sure you don't feed hay above a fiber producing animal. Basically you don't want hay and vegetable matter getting in the fiber so you need to make sure the hay racks are such that the hay can't get stuck in the coat. Good luck with your new fur baby!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What brand of loose mineral would you recomend? I am currently using one my local mill makes that seems to do the trick for my other goats, but is there any brand I should try instead? I didn't think about the hay racks, makes sense though. I have a ground feeder I can use instead of my hay bags. I am so excited to pick her up tomorrow, but also quite nervous... I heard angora/angora crosses can be delicate to take care of and I want to make sure to check all the boxes!
 

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She is so cute!
I think I would be careful with the blackberry bushes. Her fur could end up a mess.
 
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I said that because I visited a lady who had gotten 2 babydoll lambs. She let them browse in a burr patch. I will show you the picture I took, if I find it. (rofl)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh no! Burs are the worst! I have to detangle my horse's mane of them every time I let him out to pasture. :heehee: I hope you find the picture, I am very interested to see
 

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I found them!
upload_2021-3-7_20-34-2.jpeg


The second picture is complete with thistle:
upload_2021-3-7_20-35-7.jpeg


10 months later I visited again, and they were bur free! I asked, how did you get them out, did you shear them? She said no, I just picked them out, one at a time!
 

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We have a section called fuzzy fibers I think maybe reading those posts will help. I have nigies so I’m no help whatsoever. She’s a doll though, best of luck with her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
She is settled down for the night. The owner was experienced and all goats all looked healthy and seem to be receiving good care. Piney is the doeling's name, short for Pinecone. She is super sweet and very tame. Today is her first birthday, and looks like she is ready to be sheared. However my only concern, was the owner kept all the goats together in a pasture. It was a nice set up, with plenty of shelter and pasture. However they kept 3 billy goats in with the does that had just kidded and the doeling I bought. Is that a concern at all, with accidental pregnancies?
 

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I've got 4 pygora gals and they're just the sweetest things. I've never owned goats before, bought these as my 'covid project', and am enjoying them immensely. They're hardy, personable creatures, like fuzzy cottonball cats.

My girls are on an 80/20-ish mix of alfalfa hay & orchard grass. They get alfalfa pellets, probiotic biscuits a couple times a month, Manna minerals, and looove AppleSmacks horse biscuits by Star Milling. They have rotational pasture time now that it's a little green here, so that's supplemented with the trees throughout the property (they love olive trees!), wild mustard, stinging nettle, etc etc. And our lawn! I haven't had to mow in ages!

You will need to learn to shear or make a contact with a professional, because these girls need a haircut every 6 months. You might be able to fudge the timeline if you live in a particularly cold area, but the longer you wait, the more difficult it can be to process the fiber. Generally we get 3-4" staple across the prime areas in 6 months, you don't want to let it get much longer than that unless you're really careful about keeping out the vm. They can be coated with XS or XXS sheep coats, but in my experience they're wiley and have hated it, so I've given up on protecting their fiber pre-shear!
I do have to walk their pasture & the yards to rip up plants with sticky seed pods or thistle burrs. Keeping the fiber clean is a chore, but you'll thank yourself when it requires less skirting and picking in the end. They also sometimes get a little butt-trim halfway through their growing period, to keep the berries and muck away from their lady bits.

They do benefit from halter training! It'll make shearing more bearable, if you don't have a milking stand. I also take my girls for walks, but I live in an eclectic neighborhood where people walk their mini donkeys and parrots so goats on a leash is not eye-catching.

If you plan on showing Pygora, they do need to be dehorned. I bought mine for homesteading, but I'm still contemplating if we will show any offspring in the future so I paid for their papers. I was told to keep them bedded on straw hay, especially during kidding, as it's less irritating to lungs and skin. Some of our girls have really nice conformation, and might throw some pretty babies! Who knows!

206977


Wishing you a long and happy fiber-filled friendship with little Pinecone!
 
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