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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Olive my 11 yr old pygmy was down when i went out this morning. She cannot get up her back leg seems not to work . Checked everywhere couldnt find anything then lifted her tail and red from reading on line think it is a possible prolapse . Neighbor thought maybe straining to potty. Gave her 3 laxatives this morning and coffee with karo syrup. She is drinking water when i give it ate some grass i picked. Can she poop if the laxatives work or will the prolapse stop it from coming out. Not sure why she cant use back legs neighbor thinks nerve could be pinched from straining. Cant afford vet. If i cant fix her will need to put her down. I dont want her to suffer. Horrible when goats scream :cry::pray:
 

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Drescirbe or post pictures of the red. Is it form her anus? Her vulva? Is a large section coming out of the anus or vulva? A vaginal prolapse should not stop her from pooping. I've never seen a nerve pinched from straining to defecate. I've also never seen a prolaspe stop them from being able to stand up.

Could she have been butted by another goat or kicked by another animal?

Is she overweight? Some older, chubby goats will have a partial prolapse looking thing when they lay down from the pressure of their extra weight, but it goes back in when they stand.

Is she pregnant? If not knowingly, could there be a chance she might be without your knowledge? (you know how sneaky they can be)

Is she in the sun? How hot is your weather? It could it be a combo of things, especially at her age.

Does she have a fever?
 

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lottsagoats asked all the right questions......here is some info for you to read on prolaps..I hope it helps...best wishes

prolapses exist if either the vagina or the rectum is outside the doe's body. Prolapses in pregnant does usually happen during the final 30 days of pregnancy -- if they are going to occur at all. Rectal prolapses appear in does that have been improperly fed and allowed to become too fat. Proper nutritional management makes rectal prolapses unlikely to occur. Vaginal prolapses are mostly hereditary and can be bred out by mating the doe with an unrelated buck whose previous female offspring have not prolapsed. Does that prolapse more than once should be culled from the herd.

Returning a prolapse to the inside of the goat's body must be done very carefully. To prevent infection, clean the prolapse with a solution of Nolvasan teat dip or equivalent product by gently pouring the mixture over it. This is very delicate and easily torn tissue. Take great care. Put on disposable gloves and apply K-Y Jelly or similar water-soluable lubricant to the gloved hand being used to re-position the prolapse. Using the flat palm of the gloved hand, gently and with even pressure press the prolapse back inside the goat. This is a two-person job; one person has to hold the goat in a standing position while lifting its rear legs off the ground so that it can't push against the hand of the second person, who is attempting to return the prolapsed organ back inside the goat. Sometimes it is necessary to place the goat on its side in order to get the proper angle that allows reinsertion of the prolapse.

If the prolapse has been outside the body for several hours or overnight, causing it to dry out and therefore become more difficult to put back inside the goat, then granulated sugar can be sprinkled over the cleansed prolapse. Sugar helps shrink the prolapse, easing its return inside the goat's body. If none of these procedures is successful, it is time to call a veterinarian. Once the vet gets the prolapse back in place, he can install a series of pursestring stitches to hold the prolapsed organ inside. If it is a vaginal prolapse, the precise kidding date must either be known or the producer must frequently check the doe for signs of labor. When the doe's water breaks, the stitches must be cut immediately so that her kids can be born. Otherwise they will drown. Dead kids inside a doe equals toxemia and her likely death. Place the doe in a close-by pen and check her every couple of hours, including throughout the night, as kidding time nears.
 

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I do have a touch of insight.


An animal can throw their joints out of place (and into a nerve) post partum. I've seen this happen too many times.

However if she hasn't recent kidded, I would try to get her up off the ground and see exactly how she acts. Feel any suspicious in her hips, knees, or spine? It could be a pinched nerve to her hindquarters. Is her tail cold? Pinched nerves can cause straining to the point of prolapse. This I recently encountered with a 5 yr old cow close to dry up. We put her down. She pinched a nerve in the spine that put her down on those rear legs. Tail icy cold. She strained when she felt pressure within her pelvic girdle, which was all the time with no true feeling.

Not to discourage you, but I would further examine her for indeed a pinched nerve.
 

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^^^I have seen so many cases of pinched nerves and never knew about the cold tail. I do agree on getting her up for sure. As we all know goats dont take pain well and it could be something only semi bad going on with her but in the end youll have a goat that has been down so long her legs will not work. It sounds like your for sure talking about a anal prolapse, she should be able to still poo. If you look around her does it look like she has been fighting to get up? I have used the sugar thing as happybleats post says and works wonderful. If it keeps coming out those sheep prolapse harnesses are sooooo worth the money. I had one on had for 2 years and used it for the first time and its a awsome little thing to have. Also check to see if she is really going but its the runs, she may not have anything else in her to poop out. Thats been the only time I seen a anal prolapse was with a kid with the runs. Thats really all I can think of, I sure hope things are turning around for you :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We had to put her down.. tried to get her up and she would scream. Yes tail was cold. Prob the prolapse was from overweight it wasnt too bad, normally just didnt see her lying around to check it, but when she was up i never noticed it doing that before. I have 2 other pygmys in with her one is her daughter who is 10 yrs old ,the other is a nanney who is akso 10. I have a horse in there too, she doesnt kick at them but you never know. I maybe shouldnt have put her down, but she seemed to be suffering and I couldnt take that, she has been a great pet for the last 11 years never been sick or hurt, just a very loving and friendly girl couldnt stand the thought of her suffering. She will be cremated and put on my dresser with my other pets who have passed. Thank you for all the suggestions, please dont be mad and think I gave up on her, I loved her very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
She was in the same area all day she could only squirm around. No pee or poo to be found. I feel I did the right thing putting her down. I cant second guess my self now or it will drive me crazy.
 

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Your gut is usually right and I feel like you did what I would do as in the end as well too. Bless her heart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you. And yes bless her heart she was never anything but good and sweet and very loving. I will miss her greatly.:mecry::pray: RIP sweet Olive.
 

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Im so sorry,...dont second guess yourself...you did what you felt was best for her...She has had a long life of what sounds like in a loving home...I know first hand your decision was not an easy one..Hugs
 
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