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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm in a rather unusual situation. I saw some goats in an empty city lot and started feeding them. Not knowing anything about goats, I have tried to learn the basics. I don't think these goats (one Nubian, one La Mancha) are being fed properly. The owner does not speak English very well and it's hard to figure out what exactly is going on. I'm pretty sure he feeds them mostly bread with a bale of alfalfa every once in awhile. These goats are skinny, in my worried opinion. They live with a bunch of chickens whose organic feed they also eat and they drink out of the chicken waterer, I hope. I make sure they have a fresh bowl of water the couple of times a week I stop by and also bring them fresh grasses, dandelions, comfrey and forage like blackberry branches, bamboo, wisteria, and bear's breach. I got an organic grocery store to throw their leftover produce over the fence. These kids eat off of the ground where they and the chickens poop. From what I know, the combination of factors makes it likely they have worms and I want to deworm them, but don't have the money nor do I feel responsible for getting fecal floats. I gave them a mineral brick, but they don't lick it.
Is there a broad-spectrum dewormer I can use? Would it be bad to give this to them since I'm not sure they have worms?
How do I get them to use the mineral block?
Are there vitamins I should give them?
Anything else beneficial (and affordable) for their health?
It's a delicate situation and I don't want to get in the owner's face too much, but these goats are sweet and I want them to be healthy.
 

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It will not hurt to give them a dewormer. Different types are for different worms, but I use Safeguard horse paste (dose 3x the goat's estimated weight) and Ivermectin (orally 1cc per 20 lbs or injectable 1cc per 40 lbs). It is very sweet of you to take care of them! Please let me know if you have any more questions...I'd be glad to help! :)
 

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Mineral blocks are often hard for them to eat because they are so hard, if you want cheapest way for them to get the vitamins from the existing block you could break it up with a hammer and offer it to them in a bucket of some sort as more of a loose mineral.
 

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Very kind of you to care for the goats. First I would ask the owners if they mind if you deworm them, because if they are being used for milk or consumption, you could end up in trouble over it. Loose minerals are better for goats than a block -- Southern States Top Choice is great, but a smaller bag would be Manna Pro. Poor girls. They look pretty rough ... hooves too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all so much for your help! It's not so much that I'm kind to help them, more that they are manipulating me through their utter cuteness!

Is either the oral, injectable or pour-on wormer more effective than the others? I've injected a dog subcutaneously, but no one else...not sure if it's a good idea. How do you give it to them orally?

I'll take a hammer to that mineral block and see if it works. I might try smearing some peanut butter on it first. In part because it would be cute to see. Does anyone know if the minerals will hurt the chickens that co-habit their lot?
 

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With wormers, it is given orally mostly, sometimes injected depending on the wormer and if the goat is anemic.
Pour-on's are only to be used as pour-on's, do not give orally or inject.

The mineral block is useless, I would go purchase loose salt and minerals instead, even if the block is broke apart, it still isn't beneficial for the goat. :(
 

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I would get ivomec plus over ivomec..only because the plus also kills liver fluke..covers a bit more...you can do oral with it at 1 cc per30#..as Pam said..donot get pour on..it much be the injectable..
again Im with Pamon the mineral..graba bag of loose....
Threehavens has a valid point about asking first, just in case..if they got these goats to eat (yiks but possible) or milk..they maynot want chemicals in them...
 

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There are also herbal dewormers which have worked well for many and outperformed at least ivermectin in some cases. They do not pose the same "chemical" concerns. I have also known people (myself included) who mix a little diatomaceous earth in rations; it is a natural deterrent to worms. You can read about both online at Hoegger'a Goat Supply.

Also, my goats seem to really enjoy some free choice kelp meal, which is relatively affordable and poses no danger to humans using the milk or meat.
 

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I use herbs, but in serious situations it should be given several times a day until they show improvement (For example, when my kid had coccidia I gave every 15 minutes for an hour, then hourly till runs were gone. After that, every 3-4 hours until you're sure they're doing well. Then 3 times a day, 3 days after all symptoms of illness are gone. If they relapse, I start over). The right herbs, given at the right dose, are extremely effective. I have used them to clear serious infestations. I use Fir Meadow's GI Soother and DWorm A ... but with goats in this condition, an acute dosage would be advisable, which you may not have time for.

For infestations that are not life-threatening, 3 times a day for 3 days before you start their weekly dose is advisable to get them on the right track.

But, even if you can't do either of those, getting them started on it weekly or bi-weekly would still be beneficial to them, it would at least be something. It may take longer to see results without acute treatment, but you should still see them. You could mix the herbs with their minerals, or make it into a tea and add molasses. You can also drench it, or (my method) mix it with a bit of water and molasses and turn it into a cookie (it took them a few days to take it willingly, but now they can't get enough of it). Do you know if they are pregnant? If not I would double/triple the dose. If not pregnant, it cannot hurt them. When the herbs are done deworming, they go to other areas of the body, healing as they go.

This may be a good option to avoid getting chemicals in them ... even so you may want to ask the owner first. They see you feeding things do the goat, you may get in trouble, and I would hate to see that.

Where you get the herbal dewormer is VERY IMPORTANT. Not all are effective. I reccomend Fir Meadow's DWorm A, and GI Soother, combined together. Another great option is Land of Havilah's dewormer, which has also been proven effective. Both women who make the mixes are available to email with questions.
 

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I just want to point out that not only as others have said that someone might be planning on butchering them but your messing with these animals and if something happened then you are going to be blamed. You need to figure out a way to ask for permission before you mess with them. I'm sorry I'm sure you have a huge heart but if someone messed with my animals I would and have been ticked!! I would just ask first before you messed with them too much.
 

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I just want to point out that not only as others have said that someone might be planning on butchering them but your messing with these animals and if something happened then you are going to be blamed. You need to figure out a way to ask for permission before you mess with them. I'm sorry I'm sure you have a huge heart but if someone messed with my animals I would and have been ticked!! I would just ask first before you messed with them too much.
I have a tendency to agree here. If anything, you can ask to do a "goat share" and they've won per your heart. Got to be some way around this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thanks for your concerns and all of your help. The owner does know that I go in and feed and care for the goats. The gate has a lock to which I have the combination. My friend actually bought two that he had previously because they were so poorly cared for.
 

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Thanks for your concerns and all of your help. The owner does know that I go in and feed and care for the goats. The gate has a lock to which I have the combination. My friend actually bought two that he had previously because they were so poorly cared for.
Ah excellent! Would you ideally like to own them?
 
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