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From Medicine cabinet 2020:
Bloat relievers~~~~~~~~~~

True bloat is very painful.
If severe, get a vet right away.
Signs: Restlessness, abdominal discomfort, loss of appetite, and increased salivation.
The stomach becomes progressively distended on the left side.
The goat may bite and or kick at the abdominal region, followed by increased discomfort, respiratory distress, collapse and death.

For extreme emergencies:

Last resort method only~!
Use a 14 gauge, 18 gauge needle, to release the gas from the rumen(left side) in an extreme emergency.
Location of rumen video.

Treatment used below:
Massage/knead with your fist, left side (rumen) until the goat begins to burp.
Have the goats front legs up on a 12 inch step, rub down with your thumb and index finger on each side of the throat line area on neck, from under the chin, going down to the chest, walk the goat. Repeat massaging, rubbing.
You want a lot of burps or passing gas. Along with bloat subsiding.
Giving an enema may also get thing moving from that end as well.

Mild bloat can be treated with the following:

Baking Soda - Only put out or feed to goats to bring down bloat. DO not leave out free choice 24/7 . Dose - 1 Tbsp in 30cc water as drench. OTC

Gas X (or generic brand) - used for bloat. Dose 1-2 tablets every 2-4 hours; Liquid form 1-2 capfuls. OTC

Beer --Bloat/ Rumen health(dark malt is best)- Dose 1 can. The beer should be flat & room temperature - so leave it open in the house for several hours before drenching. Make sure it is not cold. It depends on size of goat as to how much to give. Beer is used to restart a rumen in shut down. It may be helpful for bloat too. OTC

Therabloat Drench--Contains poloxalene to control bloat caused by eating alfalfa and other legumes.
Dosage is 1 oz. for calves under 500 lbs. and 2 oz. for mature animals.
Give by drench or stomach tube at earliest signs of bloat. OTC

Vegetable Oil/peanut/Olive oil/ Mineral oil--
For treatment of: Bloat. Notes: Do not use mineral oil unless you add ginger, Nutridrench or something for flavor, it is tasteless and the goat can easily aspirate some into the lungs. A stomach tube to get it down, if you know how.
Give 60-90 cc's.
 

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The mouth closing tight like that sounds like tetanus to me too though I've never experienced it firsthand. Do you have access to a tetanus antitoxin? I don't know if there's a certain time limit that you need to administer that. I wish I had better answer or advice for you. Sending a million positive thoughts your way.
 

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So the veterinarian felt the initial issue was bloat? It's possible that bloat then triggered polio (thiamine deficiency). Are her eyes jittery? Polio often comes with facial paralysis but of she is truly lockjaw then I suppose tetanus is the answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
she is truly lockjaw then I suppose tetanus is the answer.
Yes now I am also thinking that and just released her from the hanging as she wasn't doing anything. Also her neck looks like that its not under her control. Rear legs are also having same issue. Jaws are fully locked but I can insert anything from sides. Saliva was hanging from her mouth. So most probably its tetanus. What you suggest for kids and my other doe? Should I give them vaccine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
But if you can talk to a vet, maybe they have ideas on how to try to beat this.
I have almost woke up 22 hours for this and now I am going to sleep. I am hoping for the best. Also if we slaughter her, we still cannot use her meat because of her condition???
Tomorrow I will tell vet that it is probably tetanus.
Also what you suggest for others? Should they get vaccine?
 

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I don't know if you can get CDT vaccines where you are, but that is what most Americans use in their goat herds. It protects against tetanus. It probably won't do anything to help the goat who is sick, but it should help protect the rest of your herd.
I know you are doing all that you can for your goat!
 

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If it is tetanus, then at this stage it is most likely too late to save her and I'm very sorry. It is very hard to treat, and early aggressive treatment is usually needed to save them. The other goats can't catch tetanus from her. It is a common bacteria that lives in the environment and enters through a wound. Sometimes the wound is very small like a puncture and you may not even notice it under the hair. Tetanus symptoms appear 1-3 weeks after injury, at which point the wound may already be healed.

Even though your other goats can't catch tetanus from the sick one, I strongly recommend giving them the vaccine. There is no way to remove tetanus bacteria from the environment, and all animals are susceptible to injury. The vaccine is cheap and easy to administer. In my opinion there is no good reason not to vaccinate for such a fatal disease. I'm sorry you're going through this. :(
 
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