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I wish mine fit me like that. My goats' hooves are right below my calf when I try the facing backward way.
I tie to fence and put them in my lap.lol When I put heir bellys on my lap, front feet on one side, back on other side, they cannot reach the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wish mine fit me like that. My goats' hooves are right below my calf when I try the facing backward way.
I tie to fence and put them in my lap.lol When I put heir bellys on my lap, front feet on one side, back on other side, they cannot reach the ground.
can you post pics so we all can see the different ways to get the same job done? we ALL would love to know all the different ways! I'm a short lil' gall so my way wont work for someone taller!
 

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Lol. I throw them on a family member's lap and trim them. Might I add I have dwarves about 50lb-60lb. They hang off, that's for sure lol. I just lay em over a lap and then front hooves are easy, they just sit there. For the back ones I have to stand over them and put a bit of body weight on them and then grasp their hooves. They kick a few times but if they are getting fed treats or good scratches they stop. We have yet to milk stand train them. Although that would be easier.
 

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If my goats had their feet on the ground they would just run away. They are slippery things!!!! The second I touch a hoof they are goners on the ground. Skittish. They are also so short I couldn't do it like a farrier does on a horse. Although with bigger, less skittish, goats, that's a great idea.
 

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I wish mine fit me like that. My goats' hooves are right below my calf when I try the facing backward way.
I tie to fence and put them in my lap.lol When I put heir bellys on my lap, front feet on one side, back on other side, they cannot reach the ground.
Ain't that the truth about how low down dwarves hooves are when trimming. I am vertically challenged and still had a difficult time bending so far over for a long period of time. What I discovered is the porch addition of my raised (10-12" off ground) goat barn was enough elevation to make a difference. The only drawback was having to turn them to do the other side.

A few months backs as a winter project, I built a type of grooming table/platform that stands 16" tall from the ground. Rectangular in shape 48" long and 28" wide with a 4x4 post in the top center for tying. It is sort of like those milking things without all the stuff to hold heads. When it's not being used, the goats use it for lounging, playing, king of the mountain and such.
 

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Ain't that the truth about how low down dwarves hooves are when trimming. I am vertically challenged and still had a difficult time bending so far over for a long period of time. What I discovered is the porch addition of my raised (10-12" off ground) goat barn was enough elevation to make a difference. The only drawback was having to turn them to do the other side.

A few months backs as a winter project, I built a type of grooming table/platform that stands 16" tall from the ground. Rectangular in shape 48" long and 28" wide with a 4x4 post in the top center for tying. It is sort of like those milking things without all the stuff to hold heads. When it's not being used, the goats use it for lounging, playing, king of the mountain and such.
If it doesn't hold heads how are they restrained?
 

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They are tied to the 4x4 post that is centered at the top of the platform.
Mine wouldn't do well with ties. They freaked when I tried to collar or halter them. They will let you do anything to them on a lap but if they are on their own 4 hooves they will put up a fight.

You know those slings they put babies in to weigh them at birth? I need a giant one of those for a restraint.

2814285.jpg
 

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Mine are okay with a halter and also a collar, they are pretty much leash trained. They love grooming and have their legs and feet handled during that time whether or not a trim is involved.

They are restrained for any work up being done on them. Grooming, vaccination, hoof trims, goat massages and scratches, temperature taking, dosing meds, giving drenches or whatever.

The dwarves will struggle, panic and freak when restrained by being held tightly in a lap; especially if the lap isn't mine and they didn't choose lap time on their own accord. No way possible for the mini Alpine to be restrained in a lap, though he will come lay his top half across my legs for lap snuggles.
 

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That's how I do it too. For the life of me I can't do it while they are on a stand. To contain mine I just use a old cattle blocking stand.
But it is time to do feet here and everything is set up different for kidding. So I didn't feel like dragging goats all over the place and threw gates so I got my fitting stand and kept the legs folded under so they were basically on the ground. That was a nightmare! So I got mad and dragged my tilt table out that I bought a few years ago but never really took the time to work out the kinks. Like it is about 6" off the ground and I can't get the goats to step into it. Also they can wiggle where their feet are tucked under them. So I got some boards and made a little ramp, got them in, tied a back leg and a front leg up to the side of the table, got a chair and went to work! I won't go back now lol usually 5 is about my limit before my back and shoulder are done for. So far the most I have done was today at 10 and the only reason I stop is because I run out of time and have to get kids from school.
IMG_2202.jpg
IMG_2203.jpg
 

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IMG_8078.JPG
I have one milk stand with a bar on the side, they can't dance around as much if I push them into it while I trim. That's the only milk stand I use to trim hooves. If I had to use my other milkstand without a side bar and only the headlock then I wouldn't be able to hold them steady to trim.

The picture shows the bar on the left that I push them into to get them to hold steady.
 

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That's how I do it too. For the life of me I can't do it while they are on a stand. To contain mine I just use a old cattle blocking stand.
But it is time to do feet here and everything is set up different for kidding. So I didn't feel like dragging goats all over the place and threw gates so I got my fitting stand and kept the legs folded under so they were basically on the ground. That was a nightmare! So I got mad and dragged my tilt table out that I bought a few years ago but never really took the time to work out the kinks. Like it is about 6" off the ground and I can't get the goats to step into it. Also they can wiggle where their feet are tucked under them. So I got some boards and made a little ramp, got them in, tied a back leg and a front leg up to the side of the table, got a chair and went to work! I won't go back now lol usually 5 is about my limit before my back and shoulder are done for. So far the most I have done was today at 10 and the only reason I stop is because I run out of time and have to get kids from school.
View attachment 155315 View attachment 155317
I'm trying to understand the picture you posted. Do the sides lock and the whole thing tilts to one side? I've never seen nor heard of these tilt tables and I'm a little intrigued :)
 

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A few months backs as a winter project, I built a type of grooming table/platform that stands 16" tall from the ground. Rectangular in shape 48" long and 28" wide with a 4x4 post in the top center for tying. It is sort of like those milking things without all the stuff to hold heads. When it's not being used, the goats use it for lounging, playing, king of the mountain and such.
I will have to try this. I was going to be real smart and build a double wide milk stand, so I could contain both goats(only had two at the time) for trimmin, meds feeding. The only thing it is good for is feeding. Anything else you try to do turns into a dance with the hind end of a goat. I have thought of putting a divider wall on it, that might would work.
 
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I will have to try this. I was going to be real smart and build a double wide milk stand, so I could contain both goats(only had two at the time) for trimmin, meds feeding. The only thing it is good for is feeding. Anything else you try to do turns into a dance with the hind end of a goat. I have thought of putting a divider wall on it, that might would work.
Good idea!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm trying to understand the picture you posted. Do the sides lock and the whole thing tilts to one side? I've never seen nor heard of these tilt tables and I'm a little intrigued :)
it looks like the tilt tables used for cows, it will lock them in then tip them over to there side so there feet/legs are available for trimming/ medical purposes, I have not seen them personally but have an idea how they work for vet stuff
 
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