The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all from WV, my name is Ron and I hope to get to know many of you and learn from your experiences. The funny thing about my situation is as a child I was pursecuted by a goat while my dad and I were looking at a bulldozer. This goat followed me everywhere and kept head butting me. 40 years later i am losing sleep because there are eight goats, two horses and a yearling calf on the lot next to me. The poor animals get a 5' round bale every 10-14 days, the goats have been sneaking over into my yard to eat the grass. I dont feel that they have enough to eat during these cold days of winter so I have been talking small bales of hay and feed pellets to help them out.

So my first question to everyone is how much should a goat be given to eat. It has been heavy on my mind to offer to buy these goats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
Well - good looking out Ron, a goat is pretty hardy, they want to have some size on them but you dont want to see skin hanging on bones. You may see their bones but it shouldn't be extreme. The rest depends on their breed. A boer for example is a big meat goat, a nubian might be smaller. However one thing about a goat lol..is they will eat lol. Hey buy them anyway and get into goats, they are alot of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,963 Posts
Could we see pictures of them, so we could help determine their breed, and see, depending on their body condition how much food they will possibly need , and if they need weight gaining supplements. Could you bring the goats some alfalfa. I think you should buy them. do the animals have a shelter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,230 Posts
Well goats are generally fussy about eating hay that's been trompled on the ground. Do they have some type of rack or cage around the base so the animals reach in to get it or they just place it on the ground? They are also fairly particular about the quality of the hay.

Either way, have you ever spoken to these neighbors? Do they live at the lot or just keep livestock there?

I'm chuckling but sorry about your childhood goat experience! I'm glad you have forgiven the species and care to make sure they are well cared for.

Full size goats will eat somewhere around 5 pounds of hay per day, horses 20 lbs per day, I'm going to guess on the yearling calf at 10 lbs per days. So 8x5 + 2x20 + 10 = 90 lbs of hay per day needed. Average round bales are 1000 to 1100 lbs. So that should last them 11-12 days.

Goats will almost always choose grass and browse over hay when they have the option! It's possible they have enough hay but choose to come to your yard instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,990 Posts
Welcome to the forum!
Do the goats at least have a shelter? I would probably ask to buy them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Trollmor

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Welcome Ron

I don't know what your relationship is with the owner of the goats. Many owners may think: someone else is feeding my goats for me, great. Others may not be overly pleased that a stranger is seriously feeding their animals. Also, consider the consequences if something should go wrong with the goats. Your neighbour could hold you responsible, Clearly if there is obvious animal abuse or neglect, authorities should be notified. I would suggest that before you start buying feed for your nieghbour's animals, you talk to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
To All, thank you for the good advice.

We are friends with the owner of the lot, the animals are owned by her daughter who lives over 30 minutes from the property. Regarding shelter, there is a barn on the lot but i am not sure if they have access. Even if they did the stall they could get into is not that large and i am concerned there is nothing on the concrete floor. I havent been in the barn for ages.

The bales of hay are just dropped on the ground, so i am thinking at least a 1/3 is wasted or picked through when really hungry.

We are thinking hard about buying, it would be a lot of work to prep our property. Ive got 11acres on the side of a hill with a river running on the other side. Only one side has a femce, thats the one bordering the farm with the goats. Ive got lots of brush, various grasses and vegetation.

It would be pleasent to watch them on the property and i am sure the australian shepard would love em too.

Ill get pictures over the next day or two
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
Welcome, really very welcome! We appreciate a member who cares for animals. (Especially when the first meeting was such a rough one!)

I agree. Talk with your neighbour when this is at all possible! I am wondering why they have the animals, if for fun or for meat or what ... If you buy them, and bring them to your land, will your neighbour then soon buy new animals, and treat them in the same way?

I really look forward to reading this thread, with photos and all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, we talked yestersay about going down and checking on the goats and they were gone. So we assumed they had been picked up Saturday while we were in town. Then low and behold later in the day the are back on theor property. The rascals must have gone through the fence on the otherside, so we took a bucket of fedd down. The video is of my wife calling them over. Ive included a few other pictures as well..

We went down again tonight and see started calling them shortly after leaving the house, they came running and meet us half way. It was nice watching them run.

I hope everyone enjoys the photos
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,240 Posts
Sounds like they've adopted you and visa versa. They are awfully cute. I'd try to buy them since you've got a relationship with them.
Welcome and good luck. Just be warned..once you get your first goat and fallen for it you'll be hooked. They're smart and incredibly fun to have around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,990 Posts
Maybe you could ask the owner if you could walk with them around your place.
Just be careful, once you invite a goat through a fence or gate, he will always expect to go through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,770 Posts
They certainly don't look as though they are starving. They look like healthy, happy little things. Their coats look thick and soft (the hallmark of a healthy goat), and what beautiful colors!

If you adopt them, you are going to have to do some work on your fences ASAP! Once goats learn how to go through barriers, they can be very hard to retrain!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
I agree, they definitely don’t look starved. Be careful with giving them feed out of the blue (by feed I assume you mean something grain-based) - too much when they don’t get it normally can give them bloat, which can be deadly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
I agree, they look fine! :) Are you on talking status with your neighbour? Personally, I get nervous if I discover someone is secretly feeding my animals! On the other hand, if the neighbour is not really interested in the individual animals, and you buy them, he/she will most probably just buy new ones! (Some people get themselves animals to slaughter ritually, which is a real shame to me!)

As has been suggested, one possibility is to make an arrangement that you look after the animals, but they stay on his/her property.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top