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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there! Need some help. I have a 3 year old Nigerian Dwarf wether who seems to be having trouble passing stool (sometimes). He will cry out in pain, his entire abdomen contracts as if he’s really squeezing hard but nothing will come out. 5 minutes later, he’ll pass stool no problem and be totally fine. Poop looks healthy, moist but the tiniest bit oval. These painful episodes happen probably 5-6 times per day. It’s really awful to hear him cry out in pain, I feel SO horrible that I cannot figure this out for him. They’ve been going on since May 7th. He’s eating and drinking but not eating enough. He’s lost weight and is looking thin. Currently feeding him orchard hay & goat chow to try and but weight on him.

I’ve taken him to the vet for X-rays, enemas, fecal, etc. They couldn’t find anything unusual, no parasites but the vet did say his rumen had stopped. I’ve tried Milk of Magnesia, baking soda, Mira lax, probiotics and nothing has helped him yet.

Back story- in February of this year he developed urinary calculi and the vet did surgery- gave him a brand new hole near his rear end so he pees like a girl! That has healed up well and the vet said she does not think his current troubles have anything to do with his urinate tract/ new hole.

Has anyone experienced anything like this with their goats?? I’m open to any and ALL advice!
 

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Since he is going poo now, his rumen is working now. He would definitely not be standing if it was down for a month.

I would try FLAT dark beer to help get some good bacteria in his belly, probiotics 5cc daily, make SURE to keep him hydrated. Really, I can only think that the stress of having UC and going under the knife has thrown his rumen out of whack!

You said his poo is an oval... Are they individual berries, or is it all clumped but the berries are there just stuck together, or is it more like a log?
 

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Vitamin B complex injections could help too. They are good for any rumen issues and general stress, and it wouldn't hurt him if he didn't end up needing it.

Are you sure he isn't having any trouble peeing? You've seen him pee normally?

My vet told me if you see them straining, it's most likely not the pooper but the pee-er ;).
 

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I'd be extremely suspicious that even with the new urinary tract, he has stones building up in the bladder and urethra. Has he been on ammonium chloride at all since the surgery? Were any diet changes made after surgery to balance the calcium and phosphorus and fight stone build up? Orchard hay and goat chow is going to result in a high phosphorus diet that may contribute to stones. If you are worried about his weight loss, I'd recommend alfalfa pellets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He has not been on ammonium chloride. How much should I dose for him? He’s currently 60 lbs. If he has stones currently, will it help to break them up? I have not changed his diet at all sincr surgery in February , except for the addition of goat chow that the vet recommended to help him gain weight. Thanks SO much for your help.
 

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He has not been on ammonium chloride. How much should I dose for him? He's currently 60 lbs. If he has stones currently, will it help to break them up? I have not changed his diet at all sincr surgery in February , except for the addition of goat chow that the vet recommended to help him gain weight. Thanks SO much for your help.
I'm fairly stunned your veterinarian performed what I assume was a very pricey surgery and then recommended Goat Chow.

Ammonium Chloride 1tsp per day, and pray it breaks up the stones: https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail...Tg3qjtGt49jqOO14-SeGLbkWv_21J6fhoCsDkQAvD_BwE

Surely the veterinarian informed you that once a goat develops stones, their risk for developing stones the rest of their life is VERY VERY high, even with surgery. The urethra won't clog as easily with the new tract, but the stones still aren't comfortable!

Get Ammonium Chloride as fast as you can, and I would recommend an immediate switch to alfalfa pellets and orchard hay. A handful of the Goat Chow per day, once he is on the alfalfa, will be fine.

The weight loss may be due to pain if he is free of parasites, teeth issues, and other diseases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
He is currently peeing through out the day, so he is not blocked.

I just gave him ammonium chloride mixed with water and syringed it in his mouth. How long should I do this for? Until he is no longer in pain?

A few more questions:

Prior to his surgery in Feb, he was only eating orchard hay and weeds/ shrubs off my property. He would occasionally get into our chickens feed and eat that. We have hard well water (high in calcium). Do you think it’s the water that could be causing his stones? Should I have him drink soft water? The vet did say that she removed calcium stones from him during surgery.

Is it okay to feed him alfalfa pellets even though they are high in calcium?
 

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I have no advice but hope you figure this out for him, with the help of these wonderful experts.
 

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If calcium stones were found then I would not introduce more calcium.
I use an online filter on our water hose to help balance out our well water. Might help with your high calcium. We use horsehydrater online hose filter.
 

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Oh that's great that she knew if they were calcium versus phosphorus. I'm sorry I assumed that phosphorus was the issue as it is often is. It's hard to know what to feed when water in minerals comes in to play. I would still recommend daily ammonium chloride for several weeks to see if that seems to address the pain issues. Even though he's not clogged because his new urinary tract is shorter & larger, the stones can still cause quite a few of discomfort passing.
 
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