Goat is showing dominance towards my son and I

Discussion in 'Pack Goat Training' started by StarckRanch, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. StarckRanch

    StarckRanch Member

    26
    Mar 27, 2017
    You are so right I never thought about it this way but yes he is the bottom of the older three! The other two that are older we had since they were weeks old and they have been held and played with frequently not to mention bottle fed by us then we got the three other goats about three months after which was our naughty goat Tenkara and the two little ones who at the time were also only weeks old Tenkara was 3 months pushing 4.

    I will take this information and work with him more! He is a sweetheart most the time loves to be pet but he just has his moments! And yes I want to put a stop to it now.
     
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  2. StarckRanch

    StarckRanch Member

    26
    Mar 27, 2017
    One More question. So like the last incident I had with him we were walking and when I tried to pass him he reared up and tucked his head at me never budded me. What would you do in this situatikn
     
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  3. StarckRanch

    StarckRanch Member

    26
    Mar 27, 2017
    [​IMG]

    Thought id share an image of our gang!
     
  4. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Oh that is a wonderful picture! I just love walking with my goats too. But my buck is starting to walk side be side with me...it seems kind of cute & friendly, but having read all this & had some pretty serious issues with him in the past, looks like I better not allow it. I'm really reluctant to engage with him physically at all (I have osteoporosis & one knock-down drag out fight with him left me sore & bruised for over a month. But I think I won!) so I'm understanding correctly that you wave a hat in their face as they start coming past you? I have a long handled tote bag I carry with their stuff that might do... Also my spray bottle but since it has a little vinegar I don't like to spray him right in the face unless he's really uppity... he gets a warning shot on the neck first.
     
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  5. jschies

    jschies Well-Known Member

    Aug 14, 2014
    Since you are walking, carry a walking stick and when they start to come past swing it out to block them.
     
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  6. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Hubby & I have had some MAJOR marital discord over this! Seriously, sometimes I was afraid I'd be picked off by a mountain lion as he really left me behind--like out of sight behind! Sometimes the trail forked & I had NO idea which way he took. More than once! The last time I just decided to sit down & wait for him to get back to the parking lot & get tired of waiting for me.....he hiked all the way back to the fork while I relaxed & listened to the birdies... that really helped with the problem. I mean really, they are going to have to wait for us either way so why not just hike slower & stay together? He's 6'1" & I'm 5' 1"...

    But I was wondering for you guys, how about putting the toddler in a backpack for dad to tote? Not only might it slow him down a bit, your son would be leading the herd & suddenly "tall" too....

    Congratulations on making this breakthrough! Goats sure like to keep us busy figuring them out!
     
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  7. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    Catharina...Goat Whisperer.
     
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  8. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Perfect! Keep him at arm's (or stick's) length. Maybe swing it down by his legs....? I really take the "don't hit their head" advice. I really think it can be almost like a reflex for them, to butt back if it feels like we "butted" them.

    Here is on one of our walks--he made a snack stop & had to catch up Do you think he's exceeding the speed limit? IMG_4108.JPG
     
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  9. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Maybe more like goat mumbler....
     
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  10. StarckRanch

    StarckRanch Member

    26
    Mar 27, 2017
    We do have a backpack and our son loves it and my husband has worn it with my son in tow too! It’s a great idea, and the kiddos just love it! [​IMG]

    I couldn’t find one of my hubby carrying him but he does often too! I probably do the majority of the time but I know a couple times with the goats he has carried my son too!
     
  11. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Beautiful, beautiful photo--I'm so glad you posted it. I'm sure it wouldn't have been as pretty with hubby in it, but he needs to be carrying that kid, not little you!
     
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  12. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    I love this suggestion!
     
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  13. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    What I would do is I'd shout "HEY!" to get his attention, and then I'd very forcibly grab him by the collar and shove that little rascal in line behind me. He'll probably race around you at the first opportunity and rear up again. He had his chance to be good the first time, so next time teach him a lesson. Run towards him and shout, flail your arms, clap your hands, stomp your feet, and whatever else it takes to scare the pants off that little stinker! If you have water or a stick, use it! Make him terrified of you in that moment. He should fully believe you're about to eat him alive. He should run away from you with his tail tucked down and his head facing away. If he runs and rears, or runs sideways with his head cocked at you, keep chasing him. Throw pinecones or sticks if you have to, but get that goat to run from you with his tail squeezed between his butt cheeks. He's only allowed to come back to you when his hackles are down and his posture relaxed.

    When he's this age and size you can make this kind of impression and the lessons are a lot more likely to stick. You won't be able to scare him this way once he's three years old and 200 lbs. so it's important to etch this lesson on his brain now. You can make friends with him again later--on your terms. The important thing after scaring your goat to death is to keep that seed of fear/respect alive. He should not be afraid of you, but he should be afraid of what will happen if he disrespects you. Keep a hawk's eye on this one goat at all times when you're with him and don't let your guard down. The slightest infractions should be corrected immediately. If he walks past you too close, knee him hard in the ribs or kick him in the butt as he goes by so he learns to give you a wide berth. If you're on a narrow trail where he shouldn't pass at all, try to grab him as he goes by and put him right back behind you. If you're petting him and his hackles go up, shoo him away and pet another goat. If he butts one of the younger goats away from you to hog the attention, chase him away and pet the youngsters right in front of him. Every little thing you can do to show him you're the boss is really important right now. It's less about flipping them over and more about gaining their respect through consistent body language that says "I'm in charge!" You can give him all the loves in the world once he's minding his manners.

    Make sure your interactions with the more dominant goats are also consistent with being in charge. Make sure you always make them move out of your way when you walk by. Make sure none of them walk directly in front of you, cut you off on trails, or block your path. You should never have to move out of the way of a goat when you're walking. The other goats may not be overtly disrespectful, but your rude goat is watching all your interactions with them, and if you move around your other goats as if they are in charge, he'll think you can be bossed.
     
  14. mariarose

    mariarose Well-Known Member

    Damfino, Goat Shouter...
     
  15. LockeEstates

    LockeEstates Active Member

    94
    Nov 25, 2017
    I have been watching this line as I have an French Alpine buckling about eight months old and he recently has started to head butt but right at the back of my knees. I had not thought of a spray bottle and he is in with the ladies (refusing separation). So in classic Karate Kid Crane move I got him to tuck tail and run by showing him I was bigger. I have been considering pack or cart training for him as my granddaughter would love to ride in a cart pulled around our one acher farm. Any suggestions?
     
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  16. Dwarf Dad

    Dwarf Dad Well-Known Member

    This is a very old thread and you may get more answers if you start your own.
    By the way, I have nigis so I don't train for that.
    If you go to "FORUMS" page and scroll down to "PACK GOAT" sub-heading there are threads about training by Damfino.
     
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  17. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    When I was walking with my goats, they constantly shifted position around me. I interpreted this as a protection against predators, like a shoal with fish, bewildering a predator. And they most often went in front of me, being "lead from behind", as David Mackenzie puts it. If I turned on my heel and went another direction, every goat did the same, and initially I had the flock at my side - or behind me, if I turned 180°.
     
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