Goat milk yogurt

Discussion in 'Cookin' Corner' started by liz, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I finally got it right! After many failed attempts that produced "slimey milk"....I did it! Helped that I bought a new digital thermometer so that I wasn't over heating the milk.


    I also found a very good way to flavor the plain yogurt!!!!! INSTANT PUDDING!!!

    So far I really like the banana the best....but I also have tried: coconut cream, cheesecake flavor and vanilla....the banana is even DH's favorite

    A cup of plain yogurt in a bowl and add 1/2 package of instant pudding...thin with more yogurt if it gets too thick.....AWESOME!!!
     
  2. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    Congrats! I still don't really like it unless I put prunes and honey in it.

    Might try your way of flavoring it. :)
     

  3. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    how do you make it??
     
  4. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    What I do is I have a culture I use to make the yogurt.

    Put milk in a pot and boil it to pasteurize.
    Let cool until 115F and then add culture or other yogurt from another batch.
    Pour into my yogotherm to insulate it and let it sit overnight.
    Put it on the fridge in the morning and once cold it's ready to eat.

    Thats to make plain yogurt. For a culture you can also add plain yogurt from the store that has active cultures.

    The yogotherm in an expensive thermos like thing. You can just put in in a glass jar and leave it in a warm pile of just dried laundry for the night.
     
  5. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    OOPS....I didn't pastuerize it......should I have?

    Also...I used the recipe from my "Goats Produce Too" cookbook.....ad filled my containers and set them on a rack in a kettle filled with 100* water for 8 hours....I kept it warm by lighting the flame under the pot and stuck a thermometer in it to make sure the water wasn't too hot...stayed warm for the entire 8 hours.
     
  6. RunAround

    RunAround New Member

    Feb 17, 2008
    Massachusetts
    No you don't have to, but I do because I'm a bit ocd. And you are incubating what ever bacteria got into the milk.

    There are many ways to keep it warm. Your way works to. I'm just lazy and like the warm laundry technique. :wink: :thumb:
     
  7. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Well...didn't pastuerize and have pretty much eaten the whole gallon myself with no bad things happening, so I'm good with not pasturizing :ROFL:
     
  8. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Well, I'm resurrecting this old post as I'm on a quest to make yogurt with a nice texture, and have failed so far.

    I tried first with cow milk, and it turned out really weird. They whey separated or something. I didn't even feed that batch to the chickens, it was that scary.

    First goat milk batch was too thin & runny - like kefir. I didn't do anything special to thicken it, so I knew it would be runny. It got mixed into a pudding pie, and tasted good.

    Second batch I added gelatin to thicken - it turned out thicker but it was EXACTLY like white elmers glue! Texture, color, consistency - just like GLUE. It did make delicious frozen yogurt, though.

    I decided not to pasturize the current batch (now incubating!), and to warm, freshly strained milk I added a half drop of rennet and the culture, and I have it in the cooler with a heating pad wrapped around it. Don't know what will happen this time. If you never hear from me again, it must have been the unpasteurized yogurt!

    I hope it behaves!
     
  9. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Rennet experiment went BAD. VERY BAD. My yogurt separated into some funky version of yogurt-cheese. Smelled like yogurt, but there was a big ball of cheesey curds in the middle and rather lovely smelling whey all around it. I used Stoneybrook yogurt for culture, which I think has a great aroma.

    Since I had to incubate it at warmer temperatures, I didn't want to use it like a cheese. And since it was separated and funky, I didn't want to use it like yogurt. So the chickens will have another feast!

    I'm going to drop into the health food store and see what thickener the commercial goat yogurts use. Hrrrrmph.
     
  10. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I was wondering how the rennet added turned out....guess the chickens won't tell :wink:

    I too use the StoneyBrook plain yogurt, turned out very well.

    I haven't made any in the last few weeks but the last batch turned out extremely well, I didn't use pint jars to incubate it in, I used a half gallon plastic container set in the bottom of a plastic cooler and added hot water to it about 3/4 the way up the container of yogurt, let it sit covered for 4 hours and it was surprisingly still at 90* I started with the water at 105*.....I added a quart of very hot water to this and brought the temp back up to 100 then left it for another 5 hours...turned out great...even thicker after it was refidgerated.

    Heres the recipe I used, from the "Goats Produce Too" cookbook
    2 quarts goat milk heated to 115*
    2 tsp plain cultured yogurt

    Fill jars and place in covered roaster, fill with hot water and let set undisturbed for 6-8 hours
     
  11. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    If you want kids to eat it I figured a home method for gogurt flavors......koolaid(no sugar if you sweeten your yogurt if not sweeten away)
     
  12. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    The health food store has goat yogurt and it has tapioca as the thickener. Tapioca starch was cheap enough there, so I bought a bag to try.

    My little heating pad keeps it at just the right temperature during incubation. I put my digital thermometer in there and it really is spot on (Ok, 112 but that's darned close!).

    I'm makin' yogurt again tomorrow! But tonight, we're eating pudding. My how we suffer. :dance:
     
  13. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Tapioca yogurt turned out so-so. Still has a weird texture. Tasted good.
     
  14. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    I hate to say it, but powdered milk is a big help in the texture area for the yougurt.
     
  15. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    I am going to try that next!
     
  16. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    I add about 1/3 cup or so to a 1 gal batch
     
  17. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Thanks - will do.

    Though I have to say - I ate some Stoney Brook the other day and it was TOO THICK! :greengrin: See how I am? I had to mix in some goat milk so I could eat it with my Kashi Go Lean Crunch cereal!

    Maybe I'll just learn to love yogurt soup. :shrug:
     
  18. Thanatos

    Thanatos New Member

    937
    Mar 16, 2009
    Lake Ariel, Pa
    My wife uses the yougurt to mix in her cereal as well and if you go 1 gal milk, 1/2c starter(plain active yougurt), and about 1/3 powdered milk it should be fine. also I incubate at 109-112 for 9-12 hrs then chill completely before using. We also sweeten and flavor with nilla and sugar to taste.
     
  19. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Alright, I've got 2 quarts brewing. Goaty darling almost put her hoof in the bucket and the milk needed to be pasteurized - good excuse to make yogurt. :greengrin:

    I am starting to really enjoy plain yogurt. Never ate it plain before, for some reason it's better when I make it myself.
     
  20. Zelda

    Zelda New Member

    185
    May 2, 2009
    Rocky Mountains
    Hmmm, that turned out pretty good.

    :cool: