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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I'm new to goat spot so I'm not quite sure how it works. Can anyone advise me if the attached goat mineral is ok. I'm new to keep goats too so any help would be much appreciated. :)
 

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Welcome to the forum:holidaywelcome:There are several threads on here about minerals too. If you type in minerals in the search bar they should come up. There’s a lot of good advice on here about them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome to the forum:holidaywelcome:There are several threads on here about minerals too. If you type in minerals in the search bar they should come up. There's a lot of good advice on here about them.
Thanks, I will check it out. Want to get my goats the best foundation I can. There's a lot to know, more than I thought.
 

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Not knowing what all your options are, or what the rest of the diet is like, and next to nothing about conditions where you are, I think that mineral is good enough to try and see. I suggest you learn what the signs of deficiency are for your common minerals, such as copper and selenium (and zinc) and then keep an eye out for those signs.

Overall, I like it.

Northern Ireland, huh? How exciting that you are here and can teach us about keeping goats there! You are very welcome here.
 

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Not knowing what all your options are, or what the rest of the diet is like, and next to nothing about conditions where you are, I think that mineral is good enough to try and see. I suggest you learn what the signs of deficiency are for your common minerals, such as copper and selenium (and zinc) and then keep an eye out for those signs.

Overall, I like it.

Northern Ireland, huh? How exciting that you are here and can teach us about keeping goats there! You are very welcome here.
I think it will be hard to not have serious deficiencies with that low level of copper. Like I said, it's not the worst I've seen but if the OP has other options I would recommend finding something better. And we really don't know what the rest of the diet is, with a calcium to phosphorus ratio such as that, I would want to know what the complete diet is. At the very least, it will need some copper supplementation.
 

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And we really don't know what the rest of the diet is,
Yes, I said this.
At the very least, it will need some copper supplementation.
Don't we all? Lol.

My best advice still, is for the OP to learn the symptoms, and watch the goats. All this will take time. Of course, the OP is completely welcome to come back with the other options available and we'll be very happy to talk about them, too. But I've no idea what mineral levels are like in the soil and plants of N.I. and I look forward to other interactions and learning.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you for everyone’s responses , much appreciated. Being from Ireland we don’t have a big choice in minerals, there is only one other goat mineral that I have came across, which I will post below in a minute. I actually had mineral ordered from America but it got turned back at customs last week as they said it was a restricted item, then I came across this one which I thought was pretty good but I’m no expert. I asked them about the ratio being 5:1 calcium to phosphorus and for goats i thought it was 2:1. They said that this was a traditional ratio from 1950’s / 1960’s and there was research done 8 years ago after going through the ‘phos’ crisis, so this is why they prefer to keep it 5:1. Sounds good to me but again I’m no expert.. :)


I’m currently feeding them grass hay free choice from a local farmer which has a good name for the quality of it. Sometimes I give them a bit of haylage as my neighbor keeps horses and she kindly lets me have some if I want it and they get barley straw free choice. They get a standard goat meal at night, don’t even know what’s in it as the label was badly damaged and there was nothing online I could see about it. It’s the only one they really do over here. Also I give them every day or every other day a bit of butternut squash, carrots and few willow branches and I’ve recently started giving them small amounts of garlic after coming across a few threads on here , I love garlic. :) I also have a block of natural rock salt for them as well.


I have no idea of the minerals in the ground it would be something I would have to look into.


Goats are doing well from what I can see. What sort of copper deficiencies can I look out for in them if there was any?
 

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What sort of copper deficiencies can I look out for in them if there was any?
The main one that you can see visually is a fishtail (hair loss on the tail making a sort of "V" shape. General roughness of the coat, an off color, faded color, black coat turning rusty or reddish, really really brittle hair that may even stand up on the ends or become white on the tips; curling hair can also be a sign. Coat condition is one of the quickest ways to see if there is a copper deficiency. But other symptoms are lack of parasite resistance, weight-loss, poor immune system, general unthriftiness, poor hoof condition, and anemia.
 

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The main one that you can see visually is a fishtail (hair loss on the tail making a sort of "V" shape. General roughness of the coat, an off color, faded color, black coat turning rusty or reddish, really really brittle hair that may even stand up on the ends or become white on the tips; curling hair can also be a sign. Coat condition is one of the quickest ways to see if there is a copper deficiency. But other symptoms are lack of parasite resistance, weight-loss, poor immune system, general unthriftiness, poor hoof condition, and anemia.
There are more, but those are the common symptoms.
 

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@David13-5 The very first sign you get (when the deficiency is easiest to correct) is a rough coat. The ends of the individual hairs will curl up like a fish hook if you don't address this right away. Then as the deficiency gets worse, you get all the other problems. A bald tip to the tail (fish tail) is a later problem and may never resolve if the deficiency has been too long-standing. So, if the coat is rough instead of smooth-shiny, then give copper boluses.

Yes, I know. This seems like a cosmetic thing. But it is an indication of worse things to come that are not cosmetic. So address it early and you can avoid worse things to come.

Mineral deficiencies are cumulative. They don't stop at merely decorative issues.

This (TGS) is primarily U.S. based, and we have a lot of products at our buying power. Other places don't have all our choices (or have different restrictions) and need different ideas to meet the needs of livestock. Please be patient with us as we have your goats in our hearts and really do want to help.
 
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