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Kinder Goat Breeder
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a question my mom has been asking me and I told her I would ask you guys for her. We've noticed that the goat poops in the compost aren't really breaking down. They are still in pelletized form. We've been a lot better about regularly turning the compost, but they still don't really break down. Is this normal? And is it safe to use in the garden for things like lettuce and root vegetables that will be touching the unbroken down goat berries?
 

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Is there poop from goats treated with ivermectin or moxidectin in the pile? These wormers kill off the microbes and insects that break down the manure.
 

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This is a question my mom has been asking me and I told her I would ask you guys for her. We've noticed that the goat poops in the compost aren't really breaking down. They are still in pelletized form. We've been a lot better about regularly turning the compost, but they still don't really break down. Is this normal? And is it safe to use in the garden for things like lettuce and root vegetables that will be touching the unbroken down goat berries?
Turning it more often should help.
 

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Kinder Goat Breeder
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there poop from goats treated with ivermectin or moxidectin in the pile? These wormers kill off the microbes and insects that break down the manure.
Nope none of that. So you think it is strange that it hasn't broken down? What about the safety concerns?
 

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I compost ALOT! goat berries not breaking down is normal, you cant turn it enough to break those pesky pellets, if you need them broken you can smash them but it is not necessary, just make sure there are aged well, even horse/cow poop hast to be processed to break down well, garden/earth worms help, tilling poop in garden helps, Black Soldier Fly larvae realy help IF you have chickens to eat the larvae ( the larvae eat most of the compost with no left overs for your plants) as long as there is no chemicals in the poop and it has bean aged well (like over winter or longer) it is safe in moderation for your garden plants (not acid loving plants like blueberries)
 

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We use goat pellets/poop in the garden for fertilize on a regular basis. However our main goat barn/stalls are on a concrete slab and with the goats walking around on it, they squish a lot of the pellets, plus the hay they drop from the mangers gets stepped on and broken up and mixed in with the pellets dust. So we just scoop/shovel it into the wheel barrel and dump it in the garden. Then I use the tractor tiller and mix it into the soil. Makes for loose dirt and in time breaks down for plant food.
 
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