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I'm just now seeing this, but I have friends that have purchased the Smithco scales and love them! IMO it would be worth the investment. You want a scale that can weigh up to at least 350lbs especially if you keep a full size buck on your property. Don't short yourself on a scale where you have to do this or that to rig it up to work.
I almost ordered the one from Swithco, but a local feed store we used to buy feed from gave us a super nice scale years ago that was given to them as a promotional thing and they never used it. It retails for $$$ so I was shocked lol. We use that scale all the time. We weigh our young goats every 2-3 weeks so we can keep up with weight gain, cocci prevention, etc. Keep your records in a binder so you can look back and compare!
It makes a huge difference on being able to medicate/deworm knowing you are not under or over medicating.

here is away to weigh them with a flexible tape measure. View attachment 209347
I used to do this route and have to say with Boer goats it's really a gamble. I've been told this works better with standard sized dairy goats. It was always at least 10lbs off if not more. I did tweak it to add 10lbs. to the total to get closer to the correct weight. How we figured it out back then was weighing market wethers and sometimes they'd let us weigh breeding does at shows, then doing the measurement.

To do this method it's Heart Girth x Heart Girth x Body Length DIVIDED BY 300 = goat weight (and again I always added 10lbs to that total).
 

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I used to do this route and have to say with Boer goats it's really a gamble. I've been told this works better with standard sized dairy goats. It was always at least 10lbs off if not more. I did tweak it to add 10lbs. to the total to get closer to the correct weight. How we figured it out back then was weighing market wethers and sometimes they'd let us weigh breeding does at shows, then doing the measurement.

To do this method it's Heart Girth x Heart Girth x Body Length DIVIDED BY 300 = goat weight (and again I always added 10lbs to that total).
I assume the measurements are in inches and the weights in pounds.

I would say that for most applications, getting the goat's weight within 10lbs is plenty good enough.That is well below 10% error for most adult goats.

I also found this chart. Probably less accurate than the formula above, but perhaps useful as a quick guideline and no math needed.

Heart girthWeight Heart girthWeight Heart girthWeight
(inches)(pounds)(inches)(pounds)(inches)(pounds)
10 3/45203032100
11 3/46213433105
12 3/47223834115
13 1/48234335125
13 3/49245036140
14 1/410255637150
14 3/411266238160
15 1/412276839170
1614287340180
1716298041190
1822308542200
1926319043215
 
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