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I recently was at a wild burro/wild horse auction and observed a lady handling a burro using a long lead rope. Burro wasn't turning where she wanted him to go and instead of fighting she just gently laid the rope over his back, worked it down his haunches and then reeled him in..he did end up going her way!

Made me wonder...Do you think applying ideas 'ala' the book the the Horse Whisperer, would have good results with goats?

I have a 2 1/2 year old goat that I'd love to train to be mannerly on the trails.

Always willing to learn,
Beth in Utah
 

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When you wake up from dipping your head down to whisper in his ear, let us know how it goes. ;-)

Seriously,
The principle is that you speak the animals language and use it's instincts in your favor. I think everyone will agree that that works better than strong-arming the animal to your will. Some have said that you can make a goat do whatever you want as long as you make him think he wants to do it.

The specifics of the personalities of animal species are different. They differ even between burros and horses. A burro will stand it's ground when the horses are running away. Your whispering has to account for that.

But there are characteristics which are shared by many herd animals that might be used to your advantage. When deer join a herd of goats, they do so because of the comfort level with the body language of the goats.

Goats raised for packing are already bonded and or socialized with people, so much of the horse whisperer technique, which is used to get close to the animal and establish a basic socialization isn't required.

There are some threads on here addressing specific 'language' behaviors of goats. I would start there rather than a horse book.

It would be cool to chart the similarities though. It might be useful when we stumble upon a herd of wolves... ;-)

I think I remember Rex saying he took older goats. Do you use any horse techniques?
 

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Speaking of "goat talk"

I was trimming, brushing and giving the yearly CDT to my boys the other day. After the trim I gave them a bucket with some mineral salt in it for being good while I got the shot ready. (They have it free choice but if it is in a different bucket they think it is a great new treat) I turned my back and I heard a scraping sound and saw that he pawed the bucket over and spilled it. I turned around and gave him a loud grunt (you know warning noise they make) and a NO.

I'm not sure if I scared the heck out of him but he certainly looked sorry.....he didn't even move an inch when I gave him the shot....and they always squirm a little. :p
 

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I had hay fever when I got the first boys. Whenever I would sneeze they would all startle and freeze. It wasn't till later I realized they sneeze as a warning to each other.

They probably thought I was looking out after them. Maybe it should be added to the break in regimen for new goats.
 
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