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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep seeing bad stories of dogs attacking goats and sheep. Does anyone have any good stories or good dogs?
 

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I have a pit/lab mix, and she doesn't run with my 10 goats and 2 sheep, but I don't chain her up anymore when I move them to different fields, and she is fine around them. She does alert me to coyotes and other dogs that might be up to no good. I have a doxin too, and at first she just freaked and tried to ankle bite everyone..., but now she just barks if she's outside on her long cable. Goats and sheep are naturally prey to dogs, except the LGD's. it took a year for my dog to not want to "play" with them anymore and to watch out for them. I still don't allow her to run with them, but at least we have a happy medium:)
 

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My parents have a lab mix that we will bring to the barn yard with us sometimes. She used to go in and visit the ducks (she likes herding them). When we got goats we made her sit outside. Now she gets to visit through the fence. No one is so excited over each other anymore. She just sits there and will lick noses if they're stuck out but mostly she and the goats just look at one another and then go about their business.
 

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Goatless goat momma
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my large dog won't dare look at the goats anymore b/c he was too excited and got in their face a few times (he does that with ppl too), and got butted by the goats. our small dog is scared of them, so she doesn't go near them.

they're not stories of "my dog and goats are best friends", but they coexist nicely.

oh, my large one can be protective, so when i'm trimming hooves, and the goats are a little distressed over that, he comes over to try to calm them, which freaks them out more. they don't understand that he's only trying to help.....
 

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I have six dogs, six different breeds, 3 were rescued as adults. All of them are great loose around all my animals. Most move out of the way of any animal bigger than a chicken but my Newfoundland loves the goats. Every morning when I milk she licks their faces and waits for me to squirt milk in her mouth.
I think it's how you train them and how much exercise they get and how much you interact with them that makes a good dog. Some breeds I would never get too. :)
 

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~Crazy Goat Lady~
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Our dog (a Golden) doesn't go in the goat pen, but if she is in the yard when/if we let them out then we don't worry about it.. She loves the kids! When we bring them in the house she is good with them and is very gentle and licks them, and lets them climb all over her :)
She is a weird dog though lol! Our cats lay with her and clean her, she try's to save mice and stuff from the cats if they squeak lol!
 

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My dog loves the goats.. the ones that were babies... she got really attached to. I don't let her run with the goats. The herd queen does not like dogs. I fear for our dogs safety when she is in there with them. They step on her toes and some try to head butt her but ... when the babies come- she is so wanting to be right there with all of them. I have a whole bunch of pictures of Shiloh and her goats.. You can go to "personalities of the farm" and see Shiloh with her beloved goats.

For the most part.. I think people don't realize that the guard dogs have to be trained. If they are in with the goats all the time- they have to be watched and trained. We have a peaceable dog but she did have to be trained not to EVER chase the goats for sport. I think that any dog needs to be watched. It isnt always necessary for some of our farms to have the dog in with the goats at all times in order to protect them. If our dog barks at something.. all the goats come running full speed up the hill to shelter as they listen to her warnings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I love these stories. I was terrified to leave my dogs run when I had the goats out. I have a lab and a small Shepard.

The Shepard is fine around anything but as soon as it runs she's after it and plays too rough. She escaped the house yesterday when I had the goats out. She came up to the yearling and instead of running he turned and bucked her in the head with his little button horns. She backed off and went to sniff the other one. Well billy has horns and is bigger than her. B4 I could do anything she got too close and he hit her in the shoulder. She yelped and ran away thankfully.
I still won't trust her around them.
 

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Lots of Good and Bad stories

I'll go with my good one first. I needed a herding dog for my sheep. Answered an ad in the Little Nickle paper for a 14 month old spayed Border Collie.
My oldest son and I went to go see her that day and brought her right home.
We would have NEVER left her anyway since the teenage boy was very abusive to her ... right in front of us.

Years go by and she has turned into the most amazing dog. During kidding or lambing season where we lived it was often -25-30. I had a small travel trailer inside my barn where I slept at night during birthing season. My girl, Trudy, always stayed right by my side.

EXCEPT for when a new lamb or kid was born. I would rush them into the travel trailer and lay the babies under the table. Trudy would stay in the trailer and do all the clean-up. I would return to find the babies fine and up looking for milk. And, Trudy would be sitting on the table begging me to return those hungry babies to their moms! Only thing she would not allow the babies to do was "hook" onto one of HER teats! LOL!

My bad story is ... Neighbors who do not respect your right to raise your livestock without worry about their dogs attacking them. Even after you have asked nicely over and over for them to control their dogs. Calling the law did not work in this case cause he WAS the law.

Was coming home one day with a car full of kids and saw my neighbors hybrid wolf dog coming from my house. His whole chest was covered in blood. I stopped and called him by name and he came to me.
When I got home ... he had killed all my turkeys, ducks and chickens he could catch.
But, he never did it again.

Another Trudy story. I had a LSGD who was inside the pen of ewes when we were prepping for shearing. I moved her out and she was loose wandering around the barn. As we were moving the sheep into the shearing area one decided to turn and ran me over. Trudy was there in a heartbeat and I guess nipped a little too hard on the ewe's leg. The ewe cried out in shock and fear and within a second this big white long haired blur of motion took two huge front feet and knocked Trudy to the ground.
Then, the guardian turned around without a bark or a growl and layed down facing away from Trudy.

Trudy left the barn and refused to work again that day or for weeks to come. But, every single time those two dogs meet each other for the rest of their lives Trudy would grab the other dog by the nose and snarl!! The guardian would just ignore her totally.:slapfloor:
 

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My Greyberian HuskHound loves goats. He raises all my bottle kids, keeping them clean, together and teaches them to eat and drink and naps with them.

My late Alaskan Malamute female loved to mother the kids.

My 2 Pyrenees LOVE the goats and try to keep their ears nice and clean. The goats hate it, but the dogs persist and I have a goat herd with the cleanest ears in the state.

The 2 Pyrs have also learned to help me keep the gpoats in the barn during milking. When they dart out the door, I just ask the girls to get the stupid goat back inside. They wander out and herd the runaway back into the barn. And then they lick the goats ears.
 

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Goatless goat momma
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lottsagoats, your dogs are hilarious!!!! i'd love to see faces of your goats when your Pyrs are licking their ears! LOL
 

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New To Social Networking Not So Much To Goats
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My goats and digs live each other!! The Great Dane Lab mix will protect them and any animal we tell her to with her life! Such a good dog. And the yellow lab just is a big love bug, would never even want to hurt anyone or anything, he is the sweetest dog you'd ever hope to meet. Wish I had some pics on my phone (it's new) I have pics if the dogs cats and goats all lying on or in front if the fireplace hearth (goats with diapers on of course;) and I have seen the Great Dane get off her doggie bed just to go snuggle with her favorite goat, Millie. So heartwarming. And if they get scared the goats run and stand behind Ella ( the Dane mix) my youngest goat who is a 10 month old ND walks on top if the yellow lab and he just lets her lol. I JUST LOVE HOW MY ANIMALS LOVE EACH OTHER:)))
 

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I have a two little rescue dogs and they are terrific with the goats. They walk right along with the goats when we go packing. Everytime we get ready to move from a place the goats have been browsing, my little dogs bark to announce the herd is moving. Also both dogs love to ride in the carts when the goats are pulling. The dogs think this is why goats were put on the earth, to pull them around and be their transportation.:)
 

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Ok you guys are inspiring- bringing home a pair of doelings today and have a reformed chicken killer (yup now she lays out in the pasture and they free range and she doesnt touch them and guards them well)-- Giant schnauzer that I am worried about....
Also a Bernese Mt dog and Great Pyr/anatolian puppy that I am not as concerned about (puppy was born and raised in a goat pasture his parents are working LGDs)....
 

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Never poke a sleeping Pom...
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We have a 110# German shepherd who has been with us longer than we have had goats.When first introduced to them his look was...oh great more annoying little critters around here :p. He was trained to stay within 20-25 feet of my small (115#) wife at all times when she is outside and does a great job with that. At first he was reluctant to follow her into the goat areas but training overcame reluctance and he now goes in wherever she goes. He pretty much ignore the goats...or did til this last kidding.

The babies found out he was soft and warm...much to his chagrin...and followed him everywhere. He finally gave up his little rumbly growl (sounded sorta like my Dad when the grandkids got a bit rowdy..hehe) and let them do as they wanted. He made a great springboard for the little goaties to jump off and when they tired themselves out, they would all crash around him and sleep. Now..they are around four months old and he has his own entourage that follows him around when ever he's in the goat pens/field/paddock areas here.

No...he is never in or around the goats without someone with him but he gets quite upset if he is left behind when my wife leaves.
 

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I have an intact, male GSD, also a reformed chicken killer, with a really, REALLY high drive and not enough training.
He just turned 2 though, and while there have been many close calls, things are getting better.
Odysseus, we call him Ody, is a handful, to say the least. And he doesn't like livestock. ANY livestock. Especially fleeing livestock.
And he's been clocked at 27mph.
He's run the cows countless times, even going so far as to maneuver into the 'wolf-kill-death' position over the back and neck of large calves for the takedown. He never once committed. It was a scare tactic. Once the cows learned that the goal was to group up, the 'wolf-kill-death' maneuver was never seen again.
We used a leader most of the time he was outside and the cows were around. They learned to not graze too close. We live in the middle of the pasture and while we have a fence now, we didn't then,.
When Diesel, the now gone resident retired draft horse, marched across the field and kicked Ody in the head for barking, we built a fence. When Diesel pushed through the fence and kicked Ody again, we got rid of the horse. But we had a fence and Ody immediately understood that we live on one side and the cows on the other.

Then it was time to move the goats out of the upper barnyard.
That meant INSIDE the fence. With Ody.
So we went with an electric fence inside of the barbwire fence we already had. The goats learned quickly, Ody stayed outside of their yard and everything was fine.
Ody even began reaching over the top and licking the muzzles of the taller goats we have.
We ended up building a kennel for Ody eventually, right next to the gate of our main fence and back to back with the goat pen. He makes a good alarm for escapees.
I have two goats out of 13 that refuse to respect the fence.

One day Ody was out and Nathan popped through the fence. Nathan is a 17" Nigerian Dwarf buck with little 5" horns. It didn't take long for Ody to come around and fine Nathan. I looked up to see goat and dog run by, we heard barking and bleating and then a loud 'THWANG' and then nothing as Ody trotted back around the house.
The next time it happened we saw it. Ody rushed Nathan, Nathan ran for the pen and 'THWANG' his horns hit the fence wire and he was in the pen. Ody stopped dead in his tracks, satisfied, and trotted off.
We're always outside when Ody is running loose though. We don't trust him. One time, during the winter, the only time he ever got out of sight, he stole a 20" bass most likely from a person fishing and brought it to us as a present.
We don't need him bringing us a kid.
We've started turning the goats out of their pen and into the main pasture with the cows now too. They don't really stick with the cows and have their own browsing spots along the woodline. Ody has since established a strict "NO ZONE" where livestock are not permitted. Basically everything inside the main fence and outside the goat fence. The goats don't understand this and stand right outside Ody's kennel and he barks and barks and they say, 'What?'
They other day I forgot the goats were out though, and mistakenly let Ody right out the front door. He bolted out into the field, ran right past the goats and into the woods to do his business, came back and sniffed around the field for an hour and watched the goats graze.
Then the goats got nervous and led themselves to their pen! No chasing!
Progress was made and is was encouraging.

Ody isn't a mean dog and I don't think he ever meant to kill a chicken. Their just so damn floppy and flappy! He never chases ducks, but ducks move in a tight knit group.
He's never torn a 4 legged creature up, never even in a dog fight. He's also still learning how to behave around his natural prey.
He's never bitten or growled at a person ever and allows children to hug and tug on him.
And an interesting note, Ody snuggles with bunnies. No joke. :D
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Our two little min pins dont go out with the goats to often. They get scared cause the goats will swarm them and then they will snip at em to make em back off. BUT...

Anytime someone shows up with a dog, I ask them to let their dog out and I go get Legion. I expose him to as many dogs as possible so if we encounter dogs on a trail, he isnt scare of them. He is at the point now he will confront any dog and its now where most dogs get freaked out when he walks towards them. They often try to high behind their owners :) And for the dogs that are somewhat aggressive or hyper... Legion doesnt tolerate that at all. He will present his horns first to show em what they can expect and if thats not enough, he launches em into the air or pins them onto the ground. Thankfully that has only happened twice. Most dogs are good dogs and respect him or at least his horns enough to be nice.
 

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I have 3 tiny poodles that are just little lap dogs now turned farm/lap dogs. They insist on going out whenever we go out, have to check all the animals, do their thing. My dog when we first got the goats thought it would be great to bark at them and ask them to play with her. That didn't turn out to well, my doe pinned her down till she yelped out of shock and then just backed off. Since then each dog has one by one been "taught a lesson" by my doe and none of them will mess with any of our goats. If the goats are out they even wait till they're gone to walk in the barn or in the fields.
 

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I have two dogs, both smaller than the Nigerians. It only took a few head butts to show the dogs that goats are not toys to be messed with. Sometimes when the goats walk by, the mini Australian shepherd gets that deer-in-the-headlights look and just freezes, hoping that the goat won't see her. The doe glares at the dog, dog pretends not to be paying attention, and life goes on. The shepherd has no problem trying to herd the 1800 lb Percheron. Not afraid of him, but if a bearded lady goes by, they turn into statues.

I know that if it came down to it, those dogs would defend the goats with their lives, so I don't worry about the little scuffs that they have now and then. It's like siblings fighting more than anything else.
 

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I'm not addicted - I'm in love!
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Our dogs are great with the animals. IME, it has to do mostly with how the dog is raised: if it is accustomed to livestock and trained to respect them. On the other hand, breed does play a big part, and some dogs you may never be able to trust.

We have two dogs: a lab/Aussie and a lab/husky. Both used to chase/kill chickens and goats; both have "reformed" with time and discipline. Then we got ducks. The dogs have chased/bitten a few times, but they are gradually getting used to them.

I now have a new dog, an Aussie/German shepherd, Amanda. She's not crazy about the ducks, but she has chased the chickens a little and I think she ate one a few weeks ago. She's doing better now.

With the goats, she's really funny. At first she wanted to herd them, but my doe Keturah would butt her every single time. Now she thinks Keturah is trying to play, and she dances back and forth, barking. Keturah is not a bit amused. She lunges, and Amanda runs, thinking she finally got the goat to play - only to be disappointed and try again.

I do NOT yet trust Amanda unsupervised with any of the animals, but she's making progress.

I don't think I could trust any dog to guard livestock 24/7 unsupervised except a trained LGD. There's a story - on here, I think - of a dog (not LGD) that had lived with goats for years, and then when two stray dogs showed up and started chasing the goats, instead of protecting the herd, he joined in the "fun." The goats were badly injured or even killed.
 
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