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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone very new to having dairy goats we recently took in 2 goats with there babies and one of the goats udders is extremely small like almost not even there anyone have any input to try and help me figure out what to do. We feed a nice grassy hay to them and feeding a 18% sweet feed to them with alfalfa pellets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The mother is approximately 3yrs old and she had two babies and we lost one last week not sure if it was due to lack of milk or due to the very cold weather that we just had. The babies are approximately 3-5 months old we think. (We took these goats in on rescue)we got them November 2. I do believe she is a nubian crossed with other breeds. She drinks water like normal. I think he udder was about the same size as when we got them. We've had them now for almost two months. The guy that we got them from was only feeding them bread so i dont know if that has anything to do with it either.
 

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The mother is approximately 3yrs old and she had two babies and we lost one last week not sure if it was due to lack of milk or due to the very cold weather that we just had. The babies are approximately 3-5 months old we think. (We took these goats in on rescue)we got them November 2. I do believe she is a nubian crossed with other breeds. She drinks water like normal. I think he udder was about the same size as when we got them. We've had them now for almost two months. The guy that we got them from was only feeding them bread so i dont know if that has anything to do with it either.
He was feeding them bread? Did they have access to grass and weeds at least? Can you upload a picture of her?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He was feeding them bread and they had a pasture but it was mainly eaten down he had 30 or more goats
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We wouldve taken more but we have a bunch weathered goats and wanted to start with the dairy goats now
 

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Good pics. Im not a dairy goat expert. Im into meat goats. On my Boers. And Spanish..their udders get smaller as the babies drink milk. Their udders are only huge before and during the birthing. Then they get smaller to maintain the food required by the kidds.
Thanks for the pics
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good pics. Im not a dairy goat expert. Im into meat goats. On my Boers. And Spanish..their udders get smaller as the babies drink milk. Their udders are only huge before and during the birthing. Then they get smaller to maintain the food required by the kidds.
Thanks for the pics
Its weird though the udder is almost flush with her underside. The other female we have her udder is big but we dont know if she's pregnant. The place where we got them the buck was just running loose with the females
 

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If her kids are 3-5 months old she very well could be weaning them. When they wean their kids the doe will dry up.

If the goats had shelter a kid that age shouldn't die of the cold.
I'd be looking at parasites, coccidia and even lice. The stress of the move will cause a bloom.

What are you feeding? Have you started the goats on a good mineral program?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
When they wean them do they lose their udder? Right now we are feeding poulin 18% sweet feed a goat mineral powder and a goat balancer. We also give them a salt lick
 

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Yes, their udder will shrink up.

Some does have more fleshing in their udder, so their udder may not go "flat" as other does.
 

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Ok..heres a pic of my boer prego..a few days before birthing
20191214_105308.jpg

She has twins now...heres her udder
20191224_090446.jpg

Doe on far right. Its about half of whats in the first pic.
 

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Regarding the minerals, it's hard for them to lick enough off a block, they need granular minerals. There are a lot out there, one decent one is Purina wind and rain. There are Many, many!

Have you run a fecal on them? Take clean (as the poop falls, catch in a Baggie or rubber glove) samples to the vet. Any vet can run a fecal. Have them check for coccidea too.

Get a fecal with emphasis on the coccidea for the kids.
That was good of you to help rescue them.
 

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Everything sounds normal. If her udder was about the same size as when you got her, and the kids are at weaning age or older, her body is just no longer producing milk to provide for those babies. Technically, her job is done.

Due to not knowing her background, she could also not be a heavy milker. However, I’m sure her diet of bread definitely didn’t help her produce much other than the bare minimum.

Once that milk production reduces that greatly, she will not be creating anymore unless she has kids again. The good news is that she looks to be drying up very nicely! No immediate visual signs of mastitis. If you want to milk her next year, give her some time to get into a healthy condition, and then you can go ahead and breed her.

As for the baby you lost, once a kid hits 8 weeks old, they really don’t need milk as long as they are already transitioned to hay, grain, browse, etc (whatever you usually feed). Some people keep babies on longer, and some don’t. There’s pros and cons to both. That would be up to you when the time comes again. That being said, I would be more worried about worms/coccidia. When goats get moved from one farm to another, they can become stressed and have a greater risk of a “worm bloom”. Plus, if they came from a poor situation, it’s likely they could have had issues there already - especially with low pasture.

Try to take a fecal sample and have your vet run it to the lab. You’ll know what issues you have, and you’ll probably feel much better. Also, make sure the kiddos are warm and not shivering. If they’re cold, see if you can deepen their bedding and/or add heat lamps or heat barrels. You don’t want any large drafts in their housing.
 
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