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nubian lover
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She weighs 45 lbs and will be 7 months the 30th . I treated her for cocci October 9. She was sold to me cheep because of her small size and growth. I looked at her records and she was treated for cocci in June, July, and aug before I bought her. When I weighed her tonight her color in her eyelids were a bright red. She eats a round bail at free will with the horse and other goat. I through then 3 scoops of corn a day.
 

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She eats a round bail at free will with the horse and other goat. I through then 3 scoops of corn a day.
Unless you have it set up so the 7 month old can eat her corn without the horse and other goat driving her away right there is at least part of your problem. There is no way a 7 month old can compete with a horse for grain. Another part of the problem is that a young goat should be on a 14% to maybe 16% goat grower pellet, not just corn. Corn is only 8% protein and it is usually used for energy, not growth. What kind of hay are feeding? Unless it alfalfa or alfalfa/grass mix, this young goat is not getting enough nutrition to allow her to grow.
 

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www.wildheartsranch.org
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Have to disagree. I have a 9 month old meat wether who's had nothing but browse all summer, and grass hay from a round bale since the weather turned. He's over 100 lb and the picture of health. It helps that he was never weaned so he got to nurse until mom dried up, but by 7 months they should be able to maintain healthy weight on normal adult rations and only need extra feed if you're trying to boost weight for meat or breeding.
 

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I understand that, and I agree with you 100% under most circumstances. However, this doeling has not had the opportunity and nutrition that your wether had. She is 7 months old and she weighs 45 lbs! It's going to take more than grass hay and corn to pull her out of this and get some growth going.
 

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Thank you. We don't get to much alfalfa down here so would alfalfa pellets or cubes work?
There is nothing wrong with grass hay, but it doesn't have enough protein to support a young animals growth and development by itself. Alfalfa pellets are usually around 18% and would go a long ways towards providing the nutrition she needs. Personally, I would go with a goat grower pellet but, if you are reluctant to buy a bag for one goat, I fully understand that and would go with the alfalfa pellets. Either separate her or set up an area where she can eat her pellets in peace without the horse and other goat driving her away.
 

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She needs to be fed by herself. I would get alfalfa pellets and also some calf manna. Remember all dietary changes need to be done slowly.

She really needs some effort and extra care to give her a chance. She was cheap for a reason and that reason was the farm didn't want to put the time, effort and money into getting her healthy. It is the previous farm's fault for not properly caring for her but it will be up to you to do everything to help her to get to her potential.

She needs more food and if you don't have a good loose goat mineral out, she needs that too. I bet she needs copper and selenium too.
 

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I'm watching you
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^^Absolutely, and you are always going to find a bit of a difference between meat wethers and dairy doelings. Most dairy producers simply have not bred them to raise well on forage. It would be a good thing but, just isn't done by most people.

I use alfalfa pellets quite a bit.
 
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