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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My two girls NEVER shut up! It's so draining! I thought at first it was just them wanting their bottles but they've been weaned for at least 2 months now. They have free choice minerals, baking soda, 2x daily alfalfa/bermuda pellets, bermuda grass free choice and nothing stops them. Every time you're outside they scream, not just bleat, but scream! It doesn't matter how long you ignore them it continues. I only live on an acre and I'm surprised my neighbors haven't complained. I've literally done nothing but feed them and zero attention for the last 2 weeks and it isn't helping. I don't know what to do?! We love them dearly but it is impossible to go outside and enjoy ourselves with them being like this. Any advice as how I can get them to stop??? :confused::eek:
 

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Unfortunately, some goats are a lot more vocal than others. The only thing I can even suggest is to get them some toys to play with. Do a search for toys and see if there has been anything posted that might work for your goats. If it's any consolation, my goats have been hollering more than usual this summer too. I know what their deal is, though. I haven't had the time to spend with them that I usually do, and they are upset.
 

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I have a weaned bottle baby that does the same thing. She doesn't even have a normal kid's voice. It sounds like an actual baby screaming than a goat. It has a bit of a hoarse edge to it lately though. Haha. We've just learned to deal with it, maybe it's just a baby phase and she'll outgrow it when she matures or kids out.
 

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When we first got our wethers, the one that was bottle-fed screamed all the time. We live in a suburban neighborhood; I thought our neighbors would kill us. Then one day he just got over it and stopped. I didn't change anything; he just stopped. Now, a year later, he gets noisy on the mornings for feeding time, and we just switched pellet feeding to the evening instead of morning, and he quieted down again.

It is a battle to figure out what will help keep goats quiet, but sometimes it really just takes a couple of weeks of growing up. Good luck!
 

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Where's their protein and fat? You have to wean them onto something equal in food value to the milk. Low quality grass hay and a small amount of alfalfa doesn't cut it. That's like feeding your child green beans and squash, where's the rest?
You're buffering their stomach to eat huge amounts of grain (baking soda) but not giving it?
 

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I have to agree with Goathiker, I'd get some grain and see if that helps.

We have one that has been very loud too, and it's frustrating. With this one, it mostly started a week ago when the kids started school. She's finicky as it is. Usually I just take a deep breath, and wait for her to work herself hoarse. Usually doesn't take long lol
The other 2 that are in the pen with her aren't too bad. The youngest one is a weaned bottle baby. The only time she screams like that is if she is hungry.
Hay only goes so far with them, especially youngsters who are used to being fed by us.
I pull her out in the morning & evening and let her have as much feed as she wants in those feedings, and if she seems really really hungry early afternoon, I'll give her a little bit. She doesn't 'overeat' which can be a problem in some goats.

So I'd definitely start them on a little grain a couple of times a day then work them up to a full ration each, and see if that helps.

I find our goats are very quiet if they are eating or have full bellies :) If not they are usually yelling at us.
 

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You said you only have 1 acre. How big is their area? I am wondering if they are bored. Do they have anything to climb on?
 

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I feel for you and I am about to go through the same thing starting today.... I am selling a milking doe and her daughter but keeping the wether and he is very very attached to his family and I know that when they are gone he is going to be hollering....... I am not looking forward to that..... all the best.
 

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I agree that more, not less interaction would do them well. Do you let them out ever? Take them for walks? I have found that since I have been letting my bucklings out, and taking them on walks, that they are much happier, and quieter when in their pen (that is a bit small for them, but I am in the process of fencing off a larger pasture for them).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Where's their protein and fat? You have to wean them onto something equal in food value to the milk. Low quality grass hay and a small amount of alfalfa doesn't cut it. That's like feeding your child green beans and squash, where's the rest?
You're buffering their stomach to eat huge amounts of grain (baking soda) but not giving it?
You are a wealth of knowledge goathiker, I appreciate all of your feedback. I was feeding them dry cob for about a month along with their alfalfa/bermuda. They ate it but usually a lot of it ended up spilled on the ground for the birds to eat and for them to poop on. They gobble up the 50/50 pellets and seem to prefer those over everything. I was talking to a Nigerian breeder in the area and she basically said as long as they're getting some alfalfa, that the grain wasn't needed until pregnant/lactating. Since I don't feed my horses any grain, just the alfalfa bermuda pellets/rice bran/beet pulp I figure it would be easier just to feed the goats as much of the same feed as possible. That way I didn't have to have so many different tubs in the shed. The screaming was zero percent better when they were getting the grain just an FYI. Do you think I should switch them to 100% alfalfa pellets? I've just read conflicting info on the feeding of straight alfalfa I would never feed my horses that. What about adding beet pulp to their feed ration? I know it is high and fiber but relatively low in protein. If it is vitally important for them to be getting grain at this age I will also add that back in. As far as the baking soda, I just figure I should offer it as I would rather be safe than sorry. They usually don't eat it...but I just like to give them the option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I agree that more, not less interaction would do them well. Do you let them out ever? Take them for walks? I have found that since I have been letting my bucklings out, and taking them on walks, that they are much happier, and quieter when in their pen (that is a bit small for them, but I am in the process of fencing off a larger pasture for them).
Normally they are SHOWERED with love. My husband and I would take them on nightly walks where they could graze on shrubs, mesquite beans, and climb rocks, stairs etc. Then after that I spend 10-15 minutes just loving on them before coming in for dinner.

To give you an idea they have a 30'x30' pen with a custom built 3 sided shed, a ramp that goes to the top, a child's playhouse that they can jump on and run through, and several logs of different sizes to walk/play on.

I'm just at my wits end with the screaming. The thought process on the less attention was that they would see that screaming didn't get them any attention. I always wait to feed them until they are polite and not screaming/jumping on me as well.
:confused:
 

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I raised out a group a couple years ago on 2 parts alfalfa pellets 1 part beet pulp, and free choice grass hay. I was really pleased with them. The Bermuda grass being a warm weather grass is lower in protein and nutrients than the cooler weather grasses such as orchard or rye grass. So the alfalfa may help.

Probably there is a couple different things going on. They miss their ba ba, they want more of everything, and they are still trying the scream for attention. Have you seen the plastic gallon jars that have goodies in them and holes just big enough for the goodies to fall out? They have to roll them to get the goodies. You can also hide apples and such around their pen for them to find. The idea being that they get rewarded for acting like goats and foraging around. Just some thoughts...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I raised out a group a couple years ago on 2 parts alfalfa pellets 1 part beet pulp, and free choice grass hay. I was really pleased with them. The Bermuda grass being a warm weather grass is lower in protein and nutrients than the cooler weather grasses such as orchard or rye grass. So the alfalfa may help.

Probably there is a couple different things going on. They miss their ba ba, they want more of everything, and they are still trying the scream for attention. Have you seen the plastic gallon jars that have goodies in them and holes just big enough for the goodies to fall out? They have to roll them to get the goodies. You can also hide apples and such around their pen for them to find. The idea being that they get rewarded for acting like goats and foraging around. Just some thoughts...
Thanks for the ideas! I will add the beet pulp to their feed ration and switch them to the alfalfa pellets and see if that helps. I have not seen those jars, I wonder if I could make something like that myself? Maybe with an old old oatmeal container...oh wait, they'd eat the cardboard lol! Maybe I could use a gallon milk just for now and see if it at least entertains them. Is this something online that I could order? Or is it a homemade thing?
 

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It was something that I saw on here actually. Just a plastic jar with holes cut partially filled with Cheerios, sunflower seeds, and such. A mayonnaise or peanut butter jar would probably work while they are little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just wanted to update and thank you all for the advice. I have changed the girls diet and added beet pulp as well as more alfalfa. I made a couple of "treat bottles" for them which they love! As well as added a new teeter totter and gave them some soccer balls which they love to roll around :) Sugar has gotten dramatically better, probably 65% less yelling than before (she is my sweet quiet one anyway ;) ) Cinnamon is probably yelling about half as much as she used to as well :cool: I'm hoping since they are not even 6 months old yet that it will continue to diminish as they age. I have also gone back to the usual routine of loving on them everyday but haven't gone back to the walks yet. I did take them on one walk and they were much more demanding the next day so I think I will wait until they're a little older. Love this site, thanks for all the info again!
 

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Ok I am going to be the meanie here.:D I think I would also do a little training in your case. Your goaties need to learn not to scream for attention. I would prep myself with a squirt bottle set on stream. Stand on the outside of the fence (choose one to train first) and wait for them to scream. When they do, squirt them right in the face. As soon as they have been quiet for a short time, (start with 15 seconds or so....extend the requirement gradually) go on inside and love on them for a minute than go out and do the same thing again. Give them lots of learning opportunities. They will soon learn that screaming is not good but talking softly is ok. You will have to gradually work to where you can be farther away without screaming, but start small and then build fast. Goats are smart, they will get it.
 
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