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We have three goldfish in our water trough. They eat most of the bugs that land on top. Goldfish are VERY large, and VERY messy, so you need a VERY large trough to house them in, and change 90% of the water often. (You don't want to change all of the water if you can help it) also, a pond filter is good to have on the trough if you do put goldies in there :) How large is your trough? You should have 100 gallons at least per fish, that's how messy they are. And, the poop turns into ammonia, which your animals then drink, and the fish live in.
 

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Do you give any food, how do they do on the cold nights
We offer good quality pellets and veggies like lettuce, peas, and aquatic plants.

Ours do fine when there is 6+ inches of ice on the trough. Of course, our are adults, so they are going to do better with the harsher water than young little ones. We do have a trough heater. Also, don't feed them when it gets cold. They hibernate and won't eat/digest the food.
 

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I personally wouldn't put one in there. They get big and messy. And if you don't have a filter on it, I honestly don't think it would last long. Not to mention most of the 13 cent little goldfish are diseased, anyways.
 

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Goldfish are messy and I don't understand why some people put them in their troughs. It would be better for the livestock to just get their trough cleaned regularly instead of relying on goldfish to clean up the algae. The algae is a lot safer and healthier than having goldfish and goldfish waste in their drinking water.
 

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Goldfish are messy and I don't understand why some people put them in their troughs. It would be better for the livestock to just get their trough cleaned regularly instead of relying on goldfish to clean up the algae. The algae is a lot safer and healthier than having goldfish and goldfish waste in their drinking water.
That is why we only have three in a 1000g trough, with plenty of algae. They wouldn't be there if they hadn't been there when we moved in.
 

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No, algae actually is good for the water.
 

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Aside from eating algae, I think a lot of folks use them to prevent mosquitoes. Gold fish LOVE mosquito larvae.

I dont have a trough, since I only have three does - I just use a rubbermaid tote. But I do have a little patio pond. Goldfish DO get BIG (even the lil 13c guys). Cold doesn't seem to phase them. Mine have had several inches of ice on top and been fine. I've heard of them freezing solid and still being alive when things thawed... but that could be an urban myth. I know a person or two who swears they've seen it though.

To keep "muck" to a minimum, I had a catfish in my pond - however THEY cannot tolerate freezing temps. I keep an aquarium heater in my pond, which doesn't keep it warm, but it keeps the water at least in the 40s. I also use "japanese trapdoor snails" - which are live breeders so they dont overpopulate. They do a GREAT job of cleaning up - in fact even since loosing the catfish my pond still requires no maintenance other than rinsing the filter once a week or so. The larger gold fish do eat a lot of the young snails, but a few manage to survive. My snail population has held stead at 6 or 8 for years now, which is perfect for my lil 50gal pond. They do have plants and stuff to hide in though.

I dont generally feed my goldfish. In the summer I toss a few pellets in there once a week or so. In the winter, even less often.

So... anyway... I dont know about how goldfish would affect goat health - but goldfish and snails do a great job at mosquito and algae control in other bodies of water. I'm tempted to put a couple goldfish in each of my rain barrels... but not sure what kind of a "life" that would be for a lil fishy.
 

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To keep "muck" to a minimum, I had a catfish in my pond - however THEY cannot tolerate freezing temps.
Well, darn. You had to go and rain on my parade, didn't you? :( I was draining the pit of the irrigation pump this fall, found a catfish in it and dumped him in the big tire tank in the back pens. Now I find that he has likely frozen. Bummer! :(
 

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Well, darn. You had to go and rain on my parade, didn't you? :( I was draining the pit of the irrigation pump this fall, found a catfish in it and dumped him in the big tire tank in the back pens. Now I find that he has likely frozen. Bummer! :(
Most catfish are tropicals or semi tropical. Unless your water doesn't reach below 60, I don't think he'll make it :(
 

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To keep "muck" to a minimum, I had a catfish in my pond
In all honesty, catfish really don't help with muck. They will scavange, but they don't eat muck. Most catfish actually create more muck, if you know what I mean ;)
 

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I could be wrong here, but this particular catfish is a wild catfish that came out of the North Platte River and I highly doubt he is a tropical fish.
 

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I could be wrong here, but this particular catfish is a wild catfish that came out of the North Platte River and I highly doubt he is a tropical fish.
If he is a wild fish, then yes, he very well could survive the winter. I am mostly talking about the pet store catfish people buy and toss out in ponds :)
 
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