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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Again I have found so many helpful things on here so gonna share what I've learned :p
I guess I am mentally slow when it comes to trimming hoofs. I can never figure out how you guys get their hoofs so flat and just always seemed like I was keeping them from getting too over grown and never getting ahead. I didn't know how off their feet were till I got that doe from crossroad. I have tried a rasp bought a hoof knife......I don't know how you guys even get those to work lol.
For my birthday my brother gave me a grinder and a flapper wheel that's made out of sand paper. I didn't think it would work but gave it a try.......OMG I'm in love!!!!! I have such purdy feet when I'm done.....and flat!!! I also did 7 goats in a hour and that's with bribing them with grain to catch them and giving copper boluses and Bose shot.
So for all of you that have looked into a grinder and don't know if it would be worth it or even work....it does and it does great. The only bad thing is their hoofs do get hot. I did a couple swipes and feel and if warm wait till it cools off. And the other bad thing.....wear gloves. I had to stop because I tapped my hand and bled all over or I would still be out there :)
 

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Where do you get this oh glorious grinder?


I have been wondering if a grinder would work... I really want one now... Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He got it at tractor supply. I have been wondering about it for the last year but the only person I knew that used one (where have you been Nancy d lol) is kinda a hard core guy with a large herd. When he said he grinds till he hits blood it put me off.
And yes Nancy I'm tossing those trimmers in the trash!!!
 

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Ours is just a DeWalt from the hardware. I use the other disk not the sander.
It took some time to get comfortable with it & yes you must wear glove on hoof holding hand.
Feet can get hot so I just make a few passes at a time.:shades:
When those little pin pricks of blood it's time to stop.

I hope you were joking about tossing the trimmers!
 

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Yay, now I can have my very own hoof grinder :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmmm maybe......I just used the grinder today and I really don't see needing them....what's you thought....what's bad about that?
 

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I would like to try one, because I still haven't figured out how I can get the hoofs the right shape and slope with just hoof trimmers.
 

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I saw a guy using a grinder at a show just recently. He did say to make sure you get a straight one and not and angle grinder because it was harder to get the hooves flat with the angled one.
 

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I use a grinder on my horses hoofs. Never thought of using it on the goats. The disks are pretty heavy duty for the horses, what are you all using for he goats? Is there a grit or grade of disks to use?
 

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Oh my gosh Id rather throw out the trimmers than go without my grinder!!
Yes! I can remember the first time we had a hoof trimmer out to do the dairy (cow) herd that had a grinder- the husband and I both just stared in awe and wonderment at what an amazingly effective idea that was. (We also probably gave the poor guy the heebie jeebies with our staring, but he was polite enough not to say anything, and he continued to show up as scheduled each month).

I'd be more in love with the grinder for goats if we had a good cordless option, and if the darn thing would fit in my pocket. It's much easier to stick the nippers in my pocket and then just do a grab and go approach to hoof trimming when we feed, or are walking through the pasture, etc.

If I could just find an affordable, goat sized version of a hoof trimming chute I'd be over the moon. I've considered asking our local metal fabricator how bad it'd be to have one custom built, but I'm fairly certain we don't want to know the answer... :(
 

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I found the disk you use can improve your results. The first disk I used was the stone type and the feet would get hot. Then I heard TB from Capriole recommend a 36 grit sanding disk. Much better. Way faster without getting hot. I bought two disks and still haven't put on the second one. Get the kind with the "flaps". Use a heavy leather glove for the hand holding the foot as a grinder is a serious tool.
http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW8306...82591228&sr=1-8&keywords=36+grit+sanding+disc
 

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Hmm...I'm thinking that the "worn out" grinders that DH can no longer use for fabricating may well still turn fast enough for hooves? I'd have a pretty much unlimited supply there :D
 

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This looks like the one he got me.....I already took the trash out.....it says angle grinder but I don't think mine is
http://www.tractorsupply.com//Produ...p_category=&parent_category_rn=&storeId=10151
The ones I did still need more off the toe but this is the closest they have ever come to being perfect
Yep. That looks like a good one.
I started out just trying to grind flat on the hoof and I was amazed how much better the feet turned out from when I was using just the trimmers. What I found for me and my goats is what I thought would produce a good foot was wrong. (again, I'm talking about me), I studied the picture of a proper goat hoof and heeded the warning that it wasn't supposed to look like a horse's hoof and so I thought the key was to take off mostly toe. I couldn't understand why my goats looked like they were skiing and their toe wasn't touching the stand. Turns out what was needing removed was pad/heel first. When that gets too grown out it causes problems. I think half the goats that people say have bad pasterns just need a good trim with the grinder. I apply most of the pressure at the heel and then go until it's flat. I use the trimmers to remove all the curl and flaps first, then grind. I've now taken it one step further and use a dremel tool to completely remove anything that separates from the main foot, like the flap on the inside of the hooves. Make it smooth. Mud and poop can no longer get in there and cause problems.
 

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I found the disk you use can improve your results. The first disk I used was the stone type and the feet would get hot. Then I heard TB from Capriole recommend a 36 grit sanding disk. Much better. Way faster without getting hot. I bought two disks and still haven't put on the second one. Get the kind with the "flaps". Use a heavy leather glove for the hand holding the foot as a grinder is a serious tool.
http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW8306...82591228&sr=1-8&keywords=36+grit+sanding+disc
How many hoof 'trims' can you do with one disk?
 
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