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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Hi All,
Lola, my Boer goat, kidded yesterday evening. This was her fourth kidding, but things didn't go smoothly. She labored longer than normal, and then had goo, then pushing. When she finally started pushing, amniotic fluid came out, but then only a hoof. Then a face and one hoof. Since the amniotic sac had already clearly broken, I couldn't push the baby back in. (My helpful ER doc hubby was giving commentary, something like, " She's doing okay, she's pushing, she's making progress...Uh, maybe you should help. Pull with the next contraction...")

Anyway, I could pull on the left leg and apply some pressure to the back of the neck and after she contacted twice more, got him out. He's like, 12 lbs! Anyway, he was up in about 20 minutes, nursing, etc. Today he has been limping on the right leg, knee seeming to buckle and bow, and shoulder joint seems looser than the other one. Still moving around, nursing, etc, not seeming in pain or anything. Should I just leave him be for a day or two, and assume that the shoulder/ leg that were tucked backwards will get better eventually? Clearly he was stretched the wrong way...
 

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I would give him a little touch of selenium on your finger tip. Since the bones are so pliable being in fluid..then hardening as the goats acclamates to gravity and air. Sometimes the joints need a little selenium. I definately would have a vet physically check the shoulder. He is a nice looking buckling.
 

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So the leg that is lame is the one that was tucked back and not the one you pulled on? Either way I'd just keep an eye on him, like the others said, give him a dose of selenium e gel or Bo-Se and a vitamin E gel cap. I've had a few that were hard pulls over the years, and they would limp or be very lame on the leg I pulled for a few days then fine after that. So hopefully that is the case with your cute guy as well.
 

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I like giving some cod liver oil too when tendons are floppy. Just poke a hole in a gel cap and squeeze into his mouth. Im betting he will be great in a few days. Congratulations..hea a doll
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would give him a little touch of selenium on your finger tip. Since the bones are so pliable being in fluid..then hardening as the goats acclamates to gravity and air. Sometimes the joints need a little selenium. I definately would have a vet physically check the shoulder. He is a nice looking buckling.
Thanks. I do this with every kid born. It looks a lot better today, so thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Precious beautiful kid.

Good advice given, hope the baby will be OK.
He's improved a lot in the last two days, I'm happy to say. Like, 80% improved.
I'm having to milk Mama Lola out on the side he's not using much. If I just milk out enough to keep her comfortable 2x/ day, hopefully it will regulate. But I'm worried the feed she's now getting after kidding will keep the milk up. Sigh. I don't want a mastitis situation like I had with with this girl's sister two years ago. ( Even with 2x meticulous daily tending, two courses of vet visits & antibiotics, she still lost lost half her udder.) Normally I wouldn't start milking her (yes, a Boer!) until the kids were 4 or 5 weeks old, and could be separated at night. For now I'm just restraining her in the kidding stall and milking out a @ 1/4 cup 3x daily to ease her udder, which is normal to the touch, soft not hard just big, and is clearly getting a bit of sucking from the Franklin!. Are there any other ways to manage this? Thanks!
 

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