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Crazy Goat Lady
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Ok, he's eating, drinking, but, he's stumbling a bit and is holding his head to the side. I gave him some thiamine for 2 days...he was dewormed last week. His temp last night was 103.1.

He seems to be able to see...I worry about polio...but maybe I should treat him for meningial worm? What about listeria? Would he have a temp?

Oh, he's about 4 months old. His pooh is normal, he got Baycox as cocci prevention.
 

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I would continue thiamine as well as large doses of Pen G....Treat for both Polio and Listereia
Whats the ML if your thiamine??? If its 100 ml then he needs 1 cc per 25# ( I would give at least 2-3 cc) and if its the 500 ml its 1 cc per 100# ...(I would give 1 cc)
 

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Also check his ears..make sure there are no ticks in them..its rare but f a tick get in the ear they will be off tilter as well...
 

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about how much does he weigh???
 

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for meningeal worm per tennessee meat goats

Treatment involves very high dosages of Ivomec Plus or generic equivalent. Ivermectin paste or pour-on are not effective. Ivomec Plus or generic equivalent is recommended because if snails or slugs are present, so may also be liver flukes, and Ivomec Plus will handle both conditions at the same time. Ivomec Plus should be given at a rate of 1 cc per 25 pounds bodyweight for at least seven days, followed by a double-the-cattle dosage of fenbendazole (Safeguard/ Panacur) for five days. (Jeffers carries both dewormers.) Dosing too low means that the deerworm continues to do damage. Enough medication needs to remain in the goat's system so that the blood-brain barrier can be crossed in order to kill the larvae that have already penetrated the spinal column. If the goat is down and can't get up on its own, the chance for recovery is not good. An anti-inflammatory drug like Banamine can be useful in alleviating the inflammation of nerve tissue. Dexamethosone should also be used if paralysis is present, dosing at approximately 8 cc per 100 lbs bodyweight and stepping down one cc per day. Dex should be given into the muscle (IM). If the sick goat is a pregnant doe, use the dexamethasone and let her abort, because she isn't likely to survive if she is trying to grow fetuses while fighting this disease. If the producer is concerned about using Dexamethasone and Banamine at the same time, then use the Dex and forget the Banamine. When symptoms are found in one goat, the producer should either treat the entire herd or watch everyone closely daily for symptoms and begin treatment immediately if discovered.
 

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best wishes :)
 

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I think I would choose safe guard over Ivomec for this since he is under 6 months old..no need to add to his troubles ;)
 

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Yes..it wont hurt to switch it...hows he doing??
 

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For M worm you do need to give both Ivomec and Safeguard. Fine to do it even on the same day. I've always done just one shot of Ivomec and 5 days of Safeguard.
 

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Good to know Karen ...
 

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Di... IF it is polio, you should have seen improvement within an hour of the first Thiamine injection... I didn't read thoroughly but have you started him on Pen G? I dose at high doses with 1cc per 10 lbs every 6 hours for the first 24 along with the Thiamine.

I hope he is showing signs of recovery at this point for you :hug:
 

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I agree with Liz..Polio would have showed improvment by now but the thiamine is a good support Vit for him, so I would continue to give it along with the wormers and Pen G.....Listereia can take a bit longer to see improvment...
What is his temp this morning??
 

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also I would give Banamine for swelling around the brain as well...
 

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Ive been reading trying to find other reasons for your bucks symtopms..I read more about the Meningeal Worm..I copied this quote so you can see how it might fit for your buck...also on the wormer info. However I do not suggest using Dex as your anti-inflamtory...I would stick to Banamine for him...

The producer should suspect Meningeal Deerworm disease if the goat displays neurologic signs or any problem involving the spinal cord, from leg dragging to inability to get up. The disease can be a slow progression of symptoms or can strike suddenly. Pneumonia is a common secondary problem, since the goat is down and therefore inactive. The infected goat does not seem to be in pain, other than the itching; most goats eat and drink until death occurs.

Treatment involves very high dosages of Ivomec Plus or generic equivalent. Ivermectin paste or pour-on are not effective. Ivomec Plus or generic equivalent is recommended because if snails or slugs are present, so may also be liver flukes, and Ivomec Plus will handle both conditions at the same time. Ivomec Plus should be given at a rate of 1 cc per 25 pounds bodyweight for at least seven days, followed by a double-the-cattle dosage of fenbendazole (Safeguard/ Panacur) for five days. (Jeffers carries both dewormers.) Dosing too low means that the deerworm continues to do damage. Enough medication needs to remain in the goat's system so that the blood-brain barrier can be crossed in order to kill the larvae that have already penetrated the spinal column. If the goat is down and can't get up on its own, the chance for recovery is not good. An anti-inflammatory drug like Banamine can be useful in alleviating the inflammation of nerve tissue. Dexamethosone should also be used if paralysis is present, dosing at approximately 8 cc per 100 lbs bodyweight and stepping down one cc per day. Dex should be given into the muscle (IM). If the sick goat is a pregnant doe, use the dexamethasone and let her abort, because she isn't likely to survive if she is trying to grow fetuses while fighting this disease. If the producer is concerned about using Dexamethasone and Banamine at the same time, then use the Dex and forget the Banamine. When symptoms are found in one goat, the producer should either treat the entire herd or watch everyone closely daily for symptoms and begin treatment immediately if discovered.

This treatment, if utilized early in the disease, can stop its progression but cannot undo any nerve damage. Permanent spinal damage (including curvature), weakness in the hindquarters, and/or inability to deliver kids may be the residual effect of Meningeal Deerworm infection. Once the spinal cord is damaged, treatment can only do so much and the goat will never be back to full health. Producers should let at least one month pass before becoming convinced that the animal has been successfully treated.
 

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Not as likely but thought I should share it just incase..

Tetanus

Tetanus is an important and highly fatal disease of goats. It occurs commonly in all ages of unexposed and unvaccinated farm animals with the horse most susceptible and the cow the least. The causative agent, Clostridium tetani, is found in soil and feces (particularly of horses) and is capable of surviving in soil for prolonged periods of time. C. tetani usually enters a body through deep puncture wounds and, following an incubation period, produces a neurotoxin that travels to the central nervous system. Some management practices that may increase the chance for tetanus infection include castration, ear tagging, dehorning, vaccinating, and banding. Elastrator bands are particularly dangerous in predisposing animals to tetanus.

Signs and symptoms

Following an incubation period of 1 to 3 wks (up to several months) the following signs develop:

Muscular stiffness/tremor.
Jaw clenching, lockjaw.
Unsteady gait due to stiffness of the limbs.
Stiff tail.
Bloat/constipation/retention of urine.
Difficulty in eating.
Anxious expression of the face.
"Sawhorse" stance.
Lying down with convulsions.
Death in 3-10 days by asphyxiation (unable to breath).
Treatment, prevention, and control

Wounds should be cleaned and open to the air to keep them aerobic (exposed to oxygen). Any dead tissue should be removed and the wound flushed with hydrogen peroxide. Give penicillin and tetanus antitoxin injections (15,000 IU twice daily, preferably in the vein, for 2 days for an adult goat). Convulsions and seizures can be controlled by sedatives given under the supervision of a veterinarian. Tetanus antitoxin is used for treatment, before surgical procedures, or after any wound. Tetanus toxoid is used for vaccinations.

Prevention consists of good hygiene and vaccination. Pens and barns should be clean. Routine vaccination with tetanus toxoid must be incorporated into the herd health program (see the Vaccination Schedule for Meat Goats in the chapter on Meat Goat Herd Health – Procedures and Prevention) and should include:

Does - third trimester of pregnancy to increase tetanus antibodies in colostrum.
Kids 4 and 8 weeks of age.
All animals annual booster.
 

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Safeguard passes the blood brain barrier. That is why the Ivomec and Safeguard treatment. So if you use the Safeguard, you shouldn't need the Ivomec for all those days in a row. Unfortunately I saw several cases of M worm in alpacas and took care of a few of those alpacas while they were convalescing. I trust the alpaca protocol more since I have seen it work when you catch M worm early.
 
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