The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I am new to this. Living in rural Missouri roughly 80miles east of Kansas city.

I had three goats turn up at the property last fall. The oldest died in the winter. Appeared to be a heart attack. Thing was half bald and very white. Appeared to be a Nubian. I am posting a picture of the last two. All were females.

The old(deceassd-poor old goat) and youngest appeared to be duplicates. Leading me to believe old goat and black goat to be mother daughter.

Needing help with this blonde, or tan goat.

Floppy's breed is not popping out on any generic breed list with pictures.

Wanting to get into milking and possibly small scale breeding.

Hope the introduction covers everything. I assume black goat is Nubian.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
58,901 Posts
They both have Nubian in them. The black one looks more full Nubian but without knowing for sure, you never know. I would say the other one is a Nubian mix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Really? Any idea what else Floppy may be? The 'Old Goat' mom looked identicle to the black goat. Except taller, older and her markings were more prominent. Those pictures are from the fall of last year. Since then Black goat got bigger. Floppy fatter. Old Goat passed away.

Floppy is a tad shorter, has a full beard now. Weighs probably 120-130pounds. Black goat finally has five, six inches of horn. Probably 100lbs now. Just about as tall as Floppy. Still not done growing. Her mother was almost two inches taller than the tan one.

Black one is silent and shy. Tan one will knock you over for attention. Bring any sweet grain and watch them chase each other for it!

Guessing black goat is 1 1/2 yes, maybe two years. When she showed up, had less than an inch of horn.

I want to start breeding for milking. Any recommended breeds to mix in? Researched some about guernsey... someone in this region breeds them. Love the color. They have been breeding four years now. Asking a lot for their does and bucks. According to my research they do well on grasses. Goats get hay, wheat and possibly rye. Pending what I decide to sew. Currently a round bale every month and some grain to supplement.

Wanting to rotate some pastures into winter wheat and rye for them. Any help appreciated. Not looking to commercialize here. Enough milk to supply one to two people. Wanting to make cheese, yogurt, butter. All things dairy. The more fat and protein the better. Not interested in meat.

Thank you all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
The black/brown one has 'airplane' ears so I am guessing Nubian and Alpine or Nigerian ...something that has stand up ears cross. The other one looks to have some Boer in it??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmm k. Thank you for the help! Boer is a meat goat. Explains why floppy is so darn hefty. She jumped up and put her front legs in my chest and winded me. One day she was being stubborn. Butted me. I grabbed her and she hauled me around her pen! The next day is chewing on me again. Silly thing.

What are these cl cae and Johnes diseases? Had them almost a year. An ancient one seemed to have a heart attack. In the morning fine. Come back two hours later, tongue out, eyes open and in a weird contorted position. These two seem super healthy. Fed well. Also-what are the posts about baking soda for? Goats get to walk around some. A decent pen.

How often to trim hooves? Use a pair of sheers? Been needing to.noticed they are getting long. Guessing trim excess even with the pad of their hoof?

Apologies for derailing the subject. Everyone is helpful with the breed deciphering!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,616 Posts
Def. have Nubian in there..but those horns are not Nubian lol..maybe Boar? If you want Dairy then I would breed with a Dairy Goat..perhaps a Nubian so the kids will have stronger Nubian likeness
here are a few links to CL CAE and Johnes
CL:http://goat-link.com/content/view/101/#.UeIZ8mSDTL8
CAE:http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/CAE.html
Johnes;http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/johne'sdisease.html

Hooves should be trimmed every 4-6 weeks...depending on growth
http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/trimminghooves.html
Baking soda:
When a goat is bloated, Baking soda helps reduce the bloat along with messaging theleft side real well..to get the rumen fuctioning again..some will leave Baking soda out free choice..but even so if a goat still ends up with bloat, 1/2-1 tespoon in enough water to drench is needed to help things along. Keeping free choice baking soda for bucks is not recommended..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,787 Posts
They just showed up at your property? That's weird, did someone dump them on you? I had a goose dumped on me last year. We like him, the daughter named him Weatherby but I thought it was really weird for someone to dump a goose on someone, even weirder to dump three goats. They look like nice goats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
The tan one appears to have some Boer in her, to me! Looks real solid! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank everyone for all the help.

In short, rumor was the neighbor raised goats. Got expensive in drought. Could not all all. Let then free.

These three turned up. Had been attacked by a lot of stuff. Kicked the alarm dogs a few times as they tried to kill the poor starving animals. Built a small pen around them. Fattened them up.

They are now two in count and in a larger pen.

After going to a pioneers day, seeing an Amish gent with two dairy goats he was selling. A short talk. He told me the breed, forgot. They were white, polled. Large udder and long tests. One was producing on average two gallons per day. Was older. The younger doe was one to one and half gallon.

Since then, wanting to get if possible a few non-polled dairy goats.

Set them in a few old horse pastures, rebuild the fence. Not too much work. Only the lowest strand of electric wire needs replaced. Deer jumped through and busted the bare wires. Years back rehung the bare center strand and marked it. The lowest got ripped out. Just rerun new.

Read up on alpine, Nubian, saanen, obers(?), trogg and this saanen+golder guernsey cross called British guernsey.

Which ones will be best for a free graze over 10+acres. Thinking about resewing some hay fields to winter wheat and winter rye. Just cycle them. Few months on each pasture. It all circles the horse corral(two, three acres). Was thinking about getting a few four hundred pound llamas and looking for a non-polled dairy goat. Plus the hot fence that should deter a bobcat/coyote/stray dog right? Was going to get the hottest fence charger I could. Llama wool may insulate some.

Have a pond for water. Three pastures. One roughly eight acres, the other two about five each. Figured would keep three llamas and probably six or eight goats.

Wanting to milk for cheese, butter. Good fat and high protein milk. Not commercial quantity. Something tasty and healthy. Enough for two people.

Thank you everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Meant; the neighbors could not sell all*

Also-wanting to get milk for drinking as well other dairy products. Prefer decent quality over quantity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,616 Posts
Here is a link that goes through the different dairy goats breeds and the butterfat amounts ans so forth but in a nut shell Guerney has the highest butter fat at 6-8% the Nubian comes in next at 4-5 % Lamancha just under that at 4-4.5% then it goes down from there lol...check out the web link, there is a bit of info on each dairy breed..sounds likeyouhave good plans ahead of you...
http://www.motherearthnews.com/home...hoosing-a-dairy-goat-breed.aspx#axzz2Z26dQLy7
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you happy bleats! So... what are a few guernsey bucks and does worth? Figure... since I have no interest commercially, maybe a guernsey buck and two doe then a Nubian buck.

Would leave me with a hodge podge mixture. Specially if they both produce decent milk.

Thank every one for their time, help and insight! This has been very, very nice.
 

·
Goat Girl
Joined
·
2,018 Posts
Guernseys are pretty rare in the US still, there is a breeder near Kansas City that has them, can't think of their name but I'm sure if you google for Golden Guernsey's in Missouri their website should come up. I think most of their kids cost around $250 and up. They seem like a fairly hardy breed, they aren't giant goats and give a decent amount of milk. All dairy breeds typically come horned, but most kids are disbudded to prevent them from growing horns, almost every breed does have certain lines that are polled, or born without horns. The breed you described that the Amish man had sound like Saanens. They are very heavy producers and get pretty big. Nubians are a really nice breed, they are more of a dual purpose breed meaning they can be used for milk or meat. They tend to be thicker made and naturally more chunky than some of the other dairy breeds.

Hodge podge goats could end up being the best milkers, especially if they get the good qualities from the different breeds they have in them.

I think your black and tan doe is a Nubian/Alpine cross and the lighter colored doe is possibly a Nubian/Kiko or a Boer/Kiko. She definitely has some Kiko in her by her horns, boers have more rounded horns that curve backwards then go down towards their neck, Kiko's usually have the flatter horns that kind of twist upwards and a little out. Nubian horns usually go back kind of like Boers, most of the Swiss dairy breeds (Alpine, Saanen, Togg, etc.) have horns that go more straight up and then back. Not sure what Guernsey horns are like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you so much!

Disbudded huh? So they prevent them from growing horns. Well, I guess could request some on next go around to be non polled then, huh?

Would say the blonde(Floppy) is kiko. Her horns are pretty flat. Not so round.

Great help. I actually found a breeder near Kansas city. May be the one you mention. Will be giving them a call some time soon.

Today I went out and started trimming the blonde goat's hooves. Didn't get them all the way down but pretty close to being flat. Decided to call it quits. Was getting awful soft. The excess nail was curled up.

Going to try catching the black one. She is more shy.

After all the bellowing and bleating, I let floppy up. She walks around then comes up and chews on me. Worst part was wrestling her down. She weighs a solid 130lbs. Almost as much as I do. Decided to roll ontop of me. Heh. Took some time using diagnol cutters. Need to buy trimming sheers.

Wasn't too bad. After I was done she just layed there on my lap.

Goats sure are funny. Guess tomorrow will be the real challenge. Gotta grab the young black one. Thankfully she is only around 110lbs.

Need to get one of those milking stations. New wood working project. Some 2x4's and plywood.

Thank everyone for all their support and assistance! Means a lot to me.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top