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Hi. I have a 4 month old pygmy goat. He has been dealing with urinary calculi and now he has prolapse of his rectum. I took him to the vet on Thursday after noticing he was bleeding from his penis. He has been crying a lot and he is on heavy antibiotics. All he does is lay around and when fed his antibiotics he just gots back to laying. Not active and I am scared that he isn't going to make it. He is incredibly bloated and this my first goat. I am lost on what to do at this point because my vet wasn't very clear with what will happen. He is separating himself from everyone and struggling to even move around. All he does is lay there and every time I touch him he cries. He is on antibiotics for the UC but with that and the prolapse, he is very uncomfortable.
 

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Crazy Goat Lady
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I am so sorry for your poor boy...and you.

I'm sorry, I have a very pessimistic view of this situation...you will hear different views I'm sure. If you have the money for "heroic" measures, you may save him. If he's still dribbling urine, antibiotics are not enough! He needs to be drenched with ammonium cloride ASAP (substitute apple cider vinegar till you get it). And, banamine for pain. http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/urinarycalculi06.html
 

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Im not trying to nag here but you have other post for this little man...if you keep it to one then we can keep track of whats going on ....

Bloat is from him being inactive.....he needs his stones taken care of and his prolaps rectum put back in and perhaps stitched to hold in. and he needs his bloat take care of ..for that you can give him 1/4 teaspoon baking soda in enough water to drench...he needs to be drenched ammonium chloride for the stones ...these things need to be done now....please go get what you need and get him started...call around for avet who knows what he is doing...if the stones willnot pass your goat will die
from tennesseemeatgoats.com
Urinary Calculi requires immediate medical attention. This condition will not correct itself and if left untreated, the goat will die. Symptoms of Urinary Calculi include tail twitching in males, restlessness, anxiety, and a "hunched-up" body posture as the goat strains to urinate. Sometimes the producer mis-diagnoses the problem as constipation or bloat because of goat's behavior and body stance. The producer should closely examine any male exhibiting these symptoms. Watch for signs of difficulty with urination.

To examine the penis by extending it out of the urethral shaft, sit the goat on its rump for easier handling and manually work the penis out of the shaft for visual examination. This can be impossible to do in goats wethered very young because the penile shaft may still be adhered to the urethral process -- one more drawback of wethering at a very young age. (A sign of sexual maturity in a buckling is his ability to extend his penis out of the shaft.) Before a male can be catherized to relieve a build-up of urine,the pizzle must be cut off. An experienced producer can do this, but most folks should have this procedure performed by a qualified veterinarian. The pizzle is the "curley-qued" appendage on the end of the penis. Oftentimes the pizzle of a goat with Urinary Calculi is black and crusty in appearance. Removal of the pizzle does not affect breeding ability. If this treatment is unsuccessful, the goat must be taken immediately to a qualified veterinarian; the need for surgery under sedation is likely. If the producer waits too long, surgery won't save the goat. Surgery is no guarantee that the goat can be saved.

Do not force a goat with Urinary Calculi to drink lots of water; if fluids can't leave the body because the exit is blocked, the only alternative is for the bladder to burst. A burst bladder cannot be fixed and is fatal. In many cases within 24 to 48 hours after the onset of Urinary Calculi the untreated goat's bladder will usually burst and the flow of urine into the sub-cutaneous tissues on the underside of the body ("Water Belly") will precede a quick and painful death. Administer Banamine (1 cc per 100 lbs bodyweight daily) for the pain that accompanies Urinary Calculi.

Vets recommend that ammonium chloride be used to treat Urinary Calculi. Ammonium chloride can be purchased in small quantities (four-pound packages) from Pipestone Vet Supply at 1-800-658-2523. Here are the dosing instructions provided to me by a producer who has been successful in using Ammonium chloride to cure Urinary Calculi. Mix the following in 20 cc water and orally drench: One (1) teaspoon Ammonium chloride per 75 lbs bodyweight every 12 hours for 2 days, then 1/2 tsp AC per 75 lbs bodyweight every 12 hours for the next 3 days, then 1/2 tsp once a day for 3 days, then 1/4 tsp daily as a preventative. Dosages are based upon 75 lb liveweights. Ammonium chloride burns the throat, so stomach tube it into the goat.

Some producers have had good luck using a product called Acid Pack available through Register Distributing: goatsupplies.netfirms.com or 1-888-310-9606.
 
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