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I have goats and I want to get even more I need all the tips I can get to how to leash train them???
 

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Okay so I show goats with just a collar,but I first train them with a halter. You can get soft nose ones at tractor supply. It is so much easier on there heads, plus you have more control over them. Once they start to lead with that,then get the leash/collar out. They lead much better(this is just my opinion). Also drag them along for awhile,and then give then a treat(raisins,peanuts,crackers,ect.) Just keep working,working,and working. Eventually they will come. Don't be afraid to drag then(I was a softy my first year,and none lead). Goodluck!
 

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Hey there barrelracer...welcome tot he forum....here are a few tips to help you get the best out of Goat spot

**Keep your post on subject,,,that way your needs don't get over looked
**Only make one post on the same subject..this way you dont get a bunch of answers in different places
** include as much info as you can so we know how to help you..EX: include temp, age, weight, as much info on your goat as possible will help us know what the problem is and hopefully help you.
Again..Welcome to Goats spot!!!
 

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leash training

If your goat likes grain or other treats: give a gentle tug on the leash, hold out food in your hand to try and "lure" them towards the pull. They will have the natural instinct to resist the pull at first, this is normal.

If they follow the lure, give a tug with no lure, and if they yield to the tug and walk towards the direction of the pull, immediately give a treat.

Go back and forth two or three feet at a time, tug, feed, tug, feed, tug, feed. They will learn to happily follow the direction of the leash. The key is to feed when the leash is slack, not feed while leash is tight, as this is rewarding resistance. When they yield and move their own feet, feed.
 

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Put the goats collar on them and every few steps they take with the lead on, give them a treat. you can even lour them with a treat. You can slowely lengthen the distance they have to go for a treat and when they are comfortable walking, just give them treats every once in a while.
 

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Here's one way I've learned!
1: put a halter on the goat ( one that goes over the nose and around the back of the head, Do NOT use one that goes on the throat) tie the halter up to a tree, or a post for about 10 minutes each day. Never leave a goat unattended! At first they are going to buck and scream like you are killing them, don't worry it isn't hurting it, it's just scarred. After about a week your goat should calm down.

2: once you can put the halter on the goat without it fighting you, you can got to step 2, which is leading it. It might take a few weeks, but with lots of practice you can have a goat walking on a leash like a dog

3: if you are wanting to show the goat in the shows, then step 3 would be to start practicing setting you goat up and walking it in a circle.

Good Luck!!!
 

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With dairy goats my kids keep animal crackers in their pocket, it makes the goat want to be next to them. With meat goats we walk in the driveway and have a pan of grain in the middle of the driveway. We walk away from the grain and then back and increase the distance every time. After a few times they figure out the routine and get a little better.
 

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My kids say that when you try to teach goats to lead you get 1 of 3 types of goats...or a combination of the 3. They are rodeo goat: they jump around like crazy, dead goat: they just lay down, or ski goat: they lock all four knees and let you drag them along like they are water skiing. The first few times of trying to lead can be funny.
 

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Here's one way I've learned!
1: put a halter on the goat ( one that goes over the nose and around the back of the head, Do NOT use one that goes on the throat) tie the halter up to a tree, or a post for about 10 minutes each day. Never leave a goat unattended! At first they are going to buck and scream like you are killing them, don't worry it isn't hurting it, it's just scarred. After about a week your goat should calm down.

2: once you can put the halter on the goat without it fighting you, you can got to step 2, which is leading it. It might take a few weeks, but with lots of practice you can have a goat walking on a leash like a dog

3: if you are wanting to show the goat in the shows, then step 3 would be to start practicing setting you goat up and walking it in a circle.

Good Luck!!!
That is good advice! Wish i wouldve done that for my goat, it wouldve been so much easier!
 
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