The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've decided my wood stand that I've used for years could be so much better if it was metal. :) So, I'm gonna buy one!

features I would like:
optional side panels,
galvanized (may consider painted though)
removable feed bucket (for training, less mess, cleaning, not trapping crud when not in use)
must work for minis and ND

Do you have one you love? Any other features to consider or look for?

I like the one Premier 1 sells except the feed pan is not removable (A LOT of comments about this design flaw), which is a deal breaker. We could hack it off and build our own removable feed pan system on it but if I'm going to buy something this expensive I'd rather have it not need immediate modifications, especially for such an obvious and simple feature. Milking Stand for Goats and Sheep
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
I love the metal milk stand I bought from Caprine Supply:

I have a regular headpiece on mine but they also make one for minis. I like it because the top opens up completely to accommodate horned goats.

I bought the wheels that go on the front legs so I can easily roll it around. It also folds up so it takes up less room if I bring it to a show. However, it does not have sides. Personally, I have not found that sides are necessary. If I have a problem with a young goat trying to step off the side, I just place the stanchion next to a wall or fence, and I don't need a rail on the side I'm working from. I think rails would just get in the way.

I did add a rubber mat to the floor of the stanchion so it would be more comfortable. I just cut a piece from an old industrial floor mat, turned it upside-down so they stand on the rubber side (makes it easy to clean!), and zip-tied it in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmm...I think with a narrower stand my goats would stay straighter on the stand (one angles away from me) and the side panels would be less necessary. It's a little safer though, if they do start dancing around. And we could consider using it for our sheep, too, with adequate sides.

Damfino, do you sit on the stand or on a seat to milk? Which height do you have (12 or 16")?

Premier 1 often amends their designs based on customer feedback so I asked them if they have intentions to make theirs differently; hopefully they say it's in the works. It's such a stupid design. I love hate Premier 1.

I covet this one- goatstands But it costs $130 to ship from VT to WI.

I may just order a ramp, or find a local welder, and build the rest. My wood head gate works really well, but I want the cleaner metal platform.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
I sit on a folding stool next to the stand. This one is too narrow to sit on, and I find that I like using the stool better anyway because it puts me a little lower than the stanchion. When I sit on the stand it hurts my back because I have to lean over to milk. It's also harder to see the udder if I'm sitting on the stand and it is nice to be able to look at it easily if I feel a scab or something. I have the 16" stand. I also have big goats, so my needs might be totally different from yours. In addition to fitting my girls, my stanchion has to work for my big pack wethers who are over 200 lbs. and stand 40 inches at the withers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's the response I got from Gordon at Premier 1:
"We are looking at making a change but we have just not had the time to do it yet.
We would like it to be a small bucket for the feed."

I would encourage anyone interested in this stand to send a message to them stating you like the stand but the feed pan must change before you'd buy.

I'm holding out for their updates and inquiring with local welders also. Aluminum would sure be nice, rust wise.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top