HELP PARASITES!! Please read!

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by DaSouthernYankee, Apr 23, 2020.

  1. DaSouthernYankee

    DaSouthernYankee New Member

    10
    Nov 30, 2018
    Saucier, MS
    Okay forgive me if this is long but I want to be detailed so I can best manage my situation.

    I have a backyard mini farm with a fenced in acre. 2 Nigerian dwarf does that are 2 years. 4 ducks. 3 chickens. 5 barn cats. We just brought home a new 4 week old buckling from a farm 2 hours away.

    I took him to our vet to get his first CDT and disbudded. When they ran his fecal he tested for coccidia (which I’m aware is common and not so concerned about treating) but also hookworm. So I panicked and brought a fecal from our does who tested negative for both. The vet said it’s much more likely baby buckling got his parasites from his mom/old farm- and on a scale they use (1-4) he was a +1 that they had to really look hard and only eggs were present. She said there’s no way to know if he’s begun shedding the eggs and started him on panacur. I’ve begun dosing him, quarentine him to his own enclosure but they have all been free ranging together for 6 days- aka pooping everywhere. It’s impossible for me to pick up every goat poop pellet but at least now he is in a contained area while being treated.

    So my questions are, what should I know about the life cycle?

    If I manage to kill the eggs (inside him and the yard) can I possibly get ahead of this and save my mini pasture?

    Has anyone used Wondercide? It’s a product primarily made with cedar wood oil which is advertised as animal/child safe that attacks the exoskeleton of insects and hookworm at all life stages? I was going to buy enough to treat the yard twice then repeat monthly as I retest buckling for worms.

    Any other advice would be so appreciated, I’m so scared for my herd and flock right now and really want to get control of the situation .

    Also, I have politely informed the breeder I bought him from so they can address their much larger farm (out of concern, not accusation). I realize that having livestock means these things happen but I want to be ten steps ahead.
     
  2. DaSouthernYankee

    DaSouthernYankee New Member

    10
    Nov 30, 2018
    Saucier, MS
    Also follow up question- I’ve heard of many more common dewormers, in Panacur used because he’s just a kid?
     

  3. jschies

    jschies Well-Known Member

    Aug 14, 2014
    I haven't heard of Wondercide. Let us know if it seems to help!
     
  4. DaSouthernYankee

    DaSouthernYankee New Member

    10
    Nov 30, 2018
    Saucier, MS
    I certainly will keep y’all posted. I hope I can get a handle on this. I’ll be so sad if the minifarm gets over run. :(
     
  5. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    Everything will be fine. Hookworms are not the end of the world, are harmless in small numbers, and heavy infections are not common. The fact that your vet could barely find any is a sign that the situation isn’t severe. They are not the dreaded barberpole which is known to bring down herds fast. I would honestly be more worried about coccidia in young animals.

    Their lifespan on pasture is about 3 months in the summer and 6 months in the winter. Just keep your pasture at the recommended 6+ inches, and the chance of infection decreases. They are rarely higher than the first 4 inches of grass.
     
  6. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    Also, since you have such a small herd, have you ever considered BioWorma? It’s an additive to their feed that helps stop the life cycle of worms on pastures. It’s only really financially feasible for smaller herds. Might be an idea to help with your worries.
     
  7. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  8. DaSouthernYankee

    DaSouthernYankee New Member

    10
    Nov 30, 2018
    Saucier, MS
    Thank you for your reply! My head was spinning because i have heard horror stories. My vet did mention the medicated feed but said let’s start with the panacur and then retest the decals. Do you still think it’s a good call to keep my little guy separated? I just figured at least I could contain any infected feces.

    Also we’re a mini/backyard farm so we’re a bit patchy and there are areas that don’t reach 6in. (Obviously we supplement hay alongside grazing so they eat well) I just don’t know if the minipasture is at greater risk due to its lack of 100% coverage.
     
    Iluvlilly! and CountyLineAcres like this.
  9. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    There’s nothing wrong with giving him a little more time before retesting (which is 10-14 days after treatment). Once you get those results back, then I wouldn’t hesitate to put him with everyone else. They can get more upset and stressed if left alone for long, so you just want to make sure he isn’t by himself for longer than necessary.

    While it isn’t ideal, you should be okay. If you ever need to, consider resting the pasture for a few weeks if possible. Your mini-pasture will be at greater risk, since you can not rotate, but I know of many people who successfully raise goats without pasture rotation. You sound passionate about keeping them healthy, so I think your persistence of keeping them clean will help tremendously. Plus, taking a goat off the pasture while you deworm them is one great way to prevent resistance.

    Keep up the good work!
     
  10. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California