Help rescued goat in bad condition

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by Darfa20, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. Darfa20

    Darfa20 New Member

    2
    Mar 21, 2020
    Connecticut
    Hi so my husband recently rescued a female goat. She was pregnant and gave birth to two babies. Her condition is very questionable considering I have very little education on goats. It looks like she hasn’t been milked for months or a long time. What happens if a goat doesn’t get milked? It looks like their is a lot of milk buildup in her udder and her nipples look very bruised and are sort of bloody and scabby. It looks like she’s in a lot of pain and I want to help her but don’t know what to do. Do you think she has a infection? We’ve been trying to milk her and get the milk out but it’s only coming out of one nipple and looks very painful for her because her skin is basically peeling while we do it!!! What is going on with this poor mother. We are currently bottle feeding the babies but I just want to make sure she’s not in pain.
     
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  2. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki

    Make a few more posts in here so you can post pics of this goat and udder. Just reply to this thread with anything is ok. I think you have to make five posts to be able to post pics.

    How long ago did she kid? Why were the kids pulled from her? What breed is she? Is the udder hot or cold or hard? What is her rectal temp? When you milk are you using any kind of cream to lube it so it makes it easier?

    Ok i read again.... so...... bottle feeding the kids. So she is in milk milk. She absolutely has to be milked out! With skin peeling you need a vet asap for her! Until the vet can come out..

    Warm compresses to the udder. Massage the udder. Use a lube for massage and milking. You can use a few drops of peppermint oil on the udder as well. Milk her completely out several times a day for now. It will not be easy and it will be hard work. Watch some youtube videos on milking a goat. You HAVE to get that milk out. It sounds like BAD mastitis. You can get test strips from a farm supply store to test for it. Is the milk clean or lumpy and funky stinky? The vet can give you a good antibiotic and pain meds for her that you cannot get at a farm supply store.

    Not having a vet come out is not optional here. Also you are new to goats and mastitis is no game to be playing with. It can be very deadly very quickly.
     

  3. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki
  4. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    You covered the doe very well. The kidds ,did they get colostrum? Or did you give them milk? Just use cows milk, heat to 100°. Dont use goat replacer. The kidds only need a small amount of milk, dont overfill them. Have the kidds pooped & pee'd? Were the umbilical cords dipped in iodine?
     
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  5. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    @Sfgwife covered everything really well...I'll add:
    You can get some udder balm in the green can at a farm store to put on the teats to help them heal but first I would probably spay with chlorhexadine spray because of the scabbiness. When you're done milking dip the teats in a weak iodine solution or spray with fightbac.
    Here's a good video on how to milk
     
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  6. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Sounds like mom may have gangrenous mastitis? Bleeding..skin color and sloughing off are all signs. Can you post a picture of her udder?
    Get her temp asap..101.5-+03.5 is normal range. Get some banamine for her. It's an injectable pain reliever. 1 cc per 100# sub q. B complex injectable as a support. 4 cc per 100 pounds sub q.
     
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  7. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    I think it is very important to get a vet involved ASAP. That way you know for sure what you are dealing with and will also have someone to turn to if you need Rx drugs. Even if the vet finds nothing serious wrong with your goat right now (fingers crossed that's the case!), you'll have established a relationship that will be important down the line. I would start making calls first thing tomorrow and see if you can get an appointment that day.
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I highly agree with Damfino.
    A vet is wise at this point.
     
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  9. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    Well done to have rescued an innocent animal and her kids! :)
    Fahrenheit, not Celcius!!!

    Also I would wish for pictures, they can tell a lot. Unlike others here, I am not convinced that it really is a mastitis, it can be as simple as just too much milk in the udder. But. Also in that case the udder must be emptied, and the most efficient way is the kids, if they can be persuaded to suck. If not, you are her only chance!

    Did anyone remember to tell you a most heartly WELCOME!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  10. elvis&oliver

    elvis&oliver Well-Known Member

    830
    Jun 27, 2018
    Pa
    Wow what a way to be introduced to goats! Welcome to the forum and everyone here will help you. I think it’s great you rescued them and are eager to learn how to help her. I hope a vet can get to you quickly and you start to see some healthy results with your doe. Good luck to you!
     
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  11. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki

    How is she?
     
  12. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    Or load the goat in a car and bring her to the vet. This is a great advantage with goats rather than cows and horses!
     
  13. Darfa20

    Darfa20 New Member

    2
    Mar 21, 2020
    Connecticut
    Mom goat is healthy now. And We milked the mom twice a day and bottle fed the baby for 2 months. Now the baby goat, we named him Harry is healthy and jumping around. Thanks you all
     
  14. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    That's great that you got her healthy! Aren't baby goats great? (And aggrivating, frustrating, irritating, oh, and fun!)
     
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  15. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Love the update, very good to hear. :goodjob:
     
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