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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all! I need some help troubleshooting. I have a 2 yr old FF Alpine who dropped off production for a second time. The first time was a couple of weeks ago. The first time she had a slight fever with it, and this time was slightly under temp. These have both seemed to coincide with weather changes. First was a drop and this time was a spike in temps. I have had her since a kid and so far this doe has a spazzy temperament and seems like kind of a high-maintenance gal. The first time I treated her with Calcium, Probios, Nutridrench, and garlic and she pulled out of it and went back to normal within a couple of days. During this whole ordeal, she does not seem "sick", she is still eating, drinking, etc. just fine. On one side of her udder is slightly smaller and has more tissue in it, but I believe this is because of her buck kids favoring one side during the week they were left on her. I tested her milk with the CMT test kit and it was fine on one side, and the smaller side did thicken very slightly, but not really anything conclusive. Should I treat for mastitis? Do you think she is just super sensitive to weather? These were a couple of weeks apart, I'm not sure how far apart exactly. Could her going into heat be causing this? She doesn't appear in heat and alpines are seasonal, but I don't have a buck on the property so my girls don't typically have super strong heats. Just confused with where to go from here with her...
 

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If she is under temp in hotter weather, I would think there is an issue with her rumen. You can give daily probiotics and B complex shots, dark beer drenches, lots of tree leaves,, brush, etc., to help recondition her rumen.
Do you think she could have a worm issues?
Any feed changes or changes in your herd that could stress her out?
There is a product called Mastoblast you could try. I've been using it for the first time this year. It seems like, if it works, it works quickly. You could do that, with high doses of vit. C and garlic and a peppermint and tea tree oil massage on the affected quarter for a few days, while continuing to monitor with the CMT, to see if you can clear it up that way before starting antibiotics.
I'm so glad you seem to have caught the problem quickly! The CMT is such a useful tool for a quick look if something seems off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
She was recently wormed, I do need to send in a fecal to see if treatment was effective though. I did pull a doe out for kidding, otherwise, everything else is the same. I have never heard of mastoblast, but it seems to have glowing reviews. Thank you!
 

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She was recently wormed, I do need to send in a fecal to see if treatment was effective though. I did pull a doe out for kidding, otherwise, everything else is the same. I have never heard of mastoblast, but it seems to have glowing reviews. Thank you!
Hope you can get her fixed up in no time! It seems that, with the more temperamental goats, the least little thing can set them off. I've decided this is going to become a criteria for rehoming a doe in my herd. I am tired of the constant troubleshooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Deinitely an important factor in my opinion too! We'll see how long she stays around for, depends on how much trouble I have with her. I really like the calm, hardy goats rather than high-strung, reactive ones
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We don't really have a great goat vet here. Our vet doesn't do stuff like that as he works from his truck and doesn't have lab type equipment. Is there somewhere you can send milk samples?
 

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We don't really have a great goat vet here. Our vet doesn't do stuff like that as he works from his truck and doesn't have lab type equipment. Is there somewhere you can send milk samples?
I'm sure you could send them off. Probably to wherever they test cow milk. Your vet might know, even if he isn't good with goats.
I like to take a milk sample from an infected udder before I put any sort of treatment into the udder, so I can run a test if my treatment isn't working.
 
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