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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a pair of 3-year old female goats (cross between Nigerian Dwarf and Pygmies), bought as pets for my older daughter. The lead goat, Gaby, has increasingly problematic behavior--butting me and my daughters (ages 7 and 13), constantly rearing up in challenge at us, etc. We have covered her horns in rubber tubing to prevent goring (she gored my sister's leg 2 years ago), but I don't know how to manage her increasingly aggressive behavior with people, other than by just keeping her penned up all the time (which we might have to do). Any advice or insight appreciated. We have tried both a dog-training horn and a spray bottle, without much success (though I don't know if we used either long enough of consistently enough).
 

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I agree with the others, I would not keep her, she is not a goat you enjoy, and by hurting you - you owe her nothing. Sort of like the saying 'don't bite the hand that feeds you...'
There are many wonderful goats out there that will make great pets...
 

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Amie. To me it sounds she is exerting her domi ance. Pretty much the lead sheep does. I have an ewe that was bottle raised and now is the head of her own little band of terrors. I had to teach her with a semi whip.
A firm no and hand out doesnt work here. Goats are stubborn.
You must decide if she is worth 6 months of conditioning or if it wont be easier to put her out of her missery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Amie. To me it sounds she is exerting her domi ance. Pretty much the lead sheep does. I have an ewe that was bottle raised and now is the head of her own little band of terrors. I had to teach her with a semi whip.
A firm no and hand out doesnt work here. Goats are stubborn.
You must decide if she is worth 6 months of conditioning or if it wont be easier to put her out of her missery.
Yes, definitely a dominance thing. And she thinks she can dominate the children, and maybe even me, but not my husband, so she doesn't hassle him. Thanks for your post.
 

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I agree with the others, I would not keep her, she is not a goat you enjoy, and by hurting you - you owe her nothing. Sort of like the saying 'don't bite the hand that feeds you...'
There are many wonderful goats out there that will make great pets...
Thanks. How does one find a nice goat, to make a good pet?
 

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If you just want a pet, try finding a wether from a reputable breeder. Look for someone who tests their herd to make sure you don’t invite any health issues. When you go look at the goats, see how they act. Many are standoffish with new people, but do they interact well with their current owner? Or get kids instead, raising them up with lots of pets and attention. Does tend to have a lot more drama that comes with them when compared to wethers (or bucks for that matter).
 

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When I bought my first doe, I went to look at her and she came up to me and nibbled my neck. She is still a nice doe. But she did need training not to head butt towards other goats if she thinks I have treats, or just out of jealousy. Now she knows not to do that and I rarely have to reprimand her.
I didn’t know about behaviour training until I came to TGS, so my goats had learned some bad habits. It didn’t take long with spray bottle and riding crop to teach them what’s allowed and what is not.
I find I always have to watch and not let any misbehaviour go, or else they start thinking they can run the show.
 

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To make a good adult goat you have to do work while their are young. Dont let them climb on you, dont let them cut you off while youre walking etc. There are a lot of little dominance things that lead to a bigger issues that if you have to work with at a young age.
 
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