The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

These feel like stupid questions but my brain is completely dead due to a very, very long night and, while the buckling doing okay, I'm still feeling stressed.

We have a buckling who was rejected by his FF Lamancha mom last night -- I'm working hard to just keep her still so he can eat regularly but I had some questions that I've not dealt with before. She had a long pre-labor and, while labor was completely normal, it seems to have shaken her and she just wants quiet time and doesn't want anything to do with her baby. No licking, very little sniffing, just turned away.

She just had one buckling and he's pooping, peeing, and acting normal - just being sadly refused by his mom.

I'm trying to keep her still ever couple of hours, either on milking stand or just in kidding stall, but if he can't get enough milk (she still stomps even then) and I milk her out -- how do I care for the milk? Do I put some in a bottle right away and feed him? Or do I filer it then feed it? If there is left over stuff or lots, should I store it away in fridge? Do I need to pasteurize?

How long should I keep at trying to get mom to accept him? I've never had a rejected kid before, so I feel out of my element. She's being intense in the kidding stall with him - knocking him away from her, stomping her foot when he tries to sneak in and "running" from him. We let them out with everyone this morning and she doesn't violently do anything but rather is just indifferent. So, not sure what is going on -- she's a great goat and has been around babies but definitely does not love them.

Thank you SO, SO MUCH
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
59,745 Posts
She doesn't understand the pain. She doesn't understand that letting the kid nurse will help. Her back end probably hurts. Give her a shot of Banamine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
She doesn't understand the pain. She doesn't understand that letting the kid nurse will help. Her back end probably hurts. Give her a shot of Banamine.
That makes sense - is there an alternative to Banamine that I can use temporarily? My vet wouldn't give it to me unless she saw the goat and she will not be able to make it out to our place until tomorrow/Thursday. I feel like I've seen aspirin being okay but not 100% sure.
 

·
Fair-Haven
Joined
·
4,819 Posts
Also since she only has one kid, I would milk her out to make nursing less painful for her - and you probably will have to continue to do that since she only had one kid- he will pick one side to nurse. You can milk out and put directly into the bottle if she is tested clean for CAE. Otherwise, pastuerize. You can store the leftover milk in the fridge - I do filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
We have a doe that rejects her kids after disbudding (a bit different than your situation). We tie her up in the stall, with access to food and water, until she stops acting like a jerk to her kids. Usually 12-24 hrs post disbudding. Maybe tying your doe up, along with the other suggestions, would help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,746 Posts
All great advice so far. I will add. It may take a few days of doing what you are doing and she may take him. Sometimes ff need be taught this is yours. They have never done this before. If she is being nasty in the stall put him in a crate in the stall so he is safe when you are not out there. I would keep them stalled for at least three days and maybe by then the mama light will click on for her. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi everyone! I wanted to give a quick update about what happened! We had super good fortune and our mama goat accepted the baby. This is what I did:

>I kept them both in the same kidding stall for two weeks (with regular daily breaks for mama goat to go out and eat in the fields).
>For the first 2 days, every 2-3 hours I held the mama goat still and allowed the buckling to nurse.
>I also milked twice a day.
>On the morning third day, as long as I was in the stall, the mom would let her baby nurse.
>On the night of the third day, she let the baby nurse even if I wasn't there (I hid and watched) and on the morning of the fourth day, I found them curled up together sleeping.

So, in case anyone reads this in the future, it is possible for moms to reject and then accept down the road. I think it is important to know your goats history - I had given it some thought and realized that the mom goat was bottle fed, so maybe she needed a little extra help.

THANK YOU everyone who gave advice! It is so appreciated. The baby goat, who we've named Elfo, is doing wonderfully and growing so well.

My avatar is actually the two of them together.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top