The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,834 Posts
To me, he looks like he either has mites or is fighting off fly bites.

I'd give him a course of pour on ivermectin, and spray him daily with fly spray.

Torment can keep weight down.

Also, give him some alfalfa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,199 Posts
Either alfalfa pellets or alfalfa hay would be fine.

You might consider a fecal analysis in 2 weeks to assess if those dewormers are working for him. Next time use them both on the same day. Be sure you are doing them high enough.

It does look like he has some nibbling at his flanks - maybe lice is another possibility?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,834 Posts
I prefer good hay, but pellets? Just as good.

Is he in rut at all? That can keep them skinny. But honestly, that hair looks like he's in torment to me, either mites or flies. or lice, as Saltey says.

I like Endure horse spray. High quality, really works. But it won't work against mites and that's why I say also do a pour-on Ivermectin.

Alfalfa can help a goat cope with stress, such as the stress of being bitten to pieces. That's why I say give alfalfa.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Iluvlilly!

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,493 Posts
Is this Charger? Would you happen to know how old he is by any chance? (Going by his horns, he looks youngish) Also, do you know and/or could you find out what he was fed at his last home? How has his appetite been since being relocated?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,493 Posts
Thanks for the answers Spades. Here are my thoughts and observations. It appears he has been consuming a diet high in corn from the condition of his horn structure. They looked a little pitted and brittle in the photo posted in later July. Also, he had weight/fat but not much muscle definition. Sort of like he was raised for rapid growth and weight gain more so than being fed an optimal nutritional and balanced based feed. A feeding program with less corn content would benefit him in the long term for multiple reasons.

I strongly recommend getting a fecal in about 2 weeks that includes coccidia testing. I know from my own experience with 2 newly acquired weanlings, scours aren't always present when there is a coccidia bloom. Not only will this tell you for sure the deworming done earlier targeted the correct type of worms, it can detect whether or not coccidia is the culprit for the weight loss.

The Alfalfa/orchard you have on hand is a good hay blend for him, I would be hesitant to add alfalfa pellets because of the higher than necessary calcium balance. If it isn't offered free choice already, consider letting him have as much hay as he wants. With males, it would be more healthy for urinary functions to up the hay than increase the amount of concentrated feed being offered if the amount being given is adequate for his growth rate. Calf manna has been mentioned as an additive for weight gain, though I personally have no experience or knowledge of using it for a feed supplement.

Keep good quality fresh loose minerals available 24/7 for him, consider adding a Trophy Rock or Redmond equine rock as a lick. These are both carried by TSC and will add additional trace minerals as well as encourage more water consumption. Males need to consume lots of water to keep the urinary system flushed out. Yes, a wether can be more susceptible than a buck to UC, though it occurs with intact male goats as well.

Ivomec Pour On will address the possibility of lice and/or mites chewing on him, and the fly spray would help if bitting flies are tormenting him. Give your boy an extra careful skin and hair examination to check for creepy crawlers, flakiness, hair texture and so forth. He may like a nice caress and scratch here and there while giving his coat a good going over.
 

·
Registered
Goat Mentor
Joined
·
7,391 Posts
@NigerianDwarfOwner707 I am pretty sure you are a natural goat care person?
If you have affected areas you can apply natural products to them. VetRX is good and well as lavender and tea tree essential oil diluted in coconut oil. NuStock is great too. Garlic internally and zinc supplementation all help as well.

But while I am a fan of natural efforts, sometimes it's quicker for your goats to do all of that with a careful application of ivermectin pour on in the topline. I've used it, it's fairly safe in the scheme of things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So i looked at the spots where he was itching. And when got the hair out of the way there was some little black things:ahh: Is that mites?
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top