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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are hoping to have one of our doelings bred in a month or two. Not sure about the other.

Since we were dealing with pigging out at the food bowl when they were eating down at the barn together, we started bringing them up to the garage and feeding them in the milking stand while the other ate out of another feed bowl nearby, and change up who is where each time they are fed.

Are there things we can do while we have them up there to make them easier/more desensitized to handling so that when they are in milk, they won't be difficult to handle? I've been taking a grooming brush all over them, messing with their teats, and getting them used to touching their legs.

We got lucky in that the first freshener doe we have has good manners in this area.
 

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I think you're off to a great start!

i was reading in a thread months ago that their goat was freaked out by the shiny bucket. maybe put the bucket or whatever you use under the goat while she's eating and you're "milking" her?

I hope someone with more experience can chime in for you...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A couple times the buck rag jar was left on the stand and it didn't freak them out, so they don't seem too skittish of the stuff. I mean, they walk the obstacle course of death going in there right now. We have a tarp spread out with drying sunflower heads and pumpkins, their warm water bucket to take warm water down to the barn, and so many other things that they should be pretty desensitized to stuff. I will make sure they get used to the clinking sound of the metal bucket handle.
 

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We like to bring the young ones in during milking and run them through the motions. Take a rag and wipe them (we don't use water on pre-kidders), pet their bag, handle the teats, move the teats around, reach between the legs and rub their bellies, insides of the thighs, and place their feet properly apart. We also "practice" machine milking with them there, as in opening the valve underneath them to hear the air, clanking of the metal buckets, etc.
 

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It sounds like you are doing great. We did lots of brushing and touching them in various parts to get them used to us. We put them up on the milking table and brushed them, and gave them treats. (Carrots, apples and things like that.) It seems like after they kid, they are often more laid back with us then before they kidded.

Keep up the good work!
 
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