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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

Does anyone have experience with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis? One of our does aborted triplets at about 136 days, 2 normal (albeit premature) kids and one partially mummified, which I sent in to the pathology lab, along with placental parts. Results were:

"Histopathology reveals a marked bacterial placentitis, which is likely the cause of abortion in this case. Large numbers of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are isolated from bacterial culture. This is an uncommon cause of abortion, but it has been previously reported. This likely represents an ascending infection."

The doe seems to be in good health, no fever etc. I have kept her in isolation from the herd since the abortion, but am now wondering what the best strategy for herd management is (Dry the doe up for the season? Cull the doe? Destroy the meat or eat it? Cull the entire herd?)

From what I can tell,: this bacteria is zoonotic, though not very contagious, is fairly common in the environment and only causes problems when an animal is compromised...BUT I produce fresh raw goat cheese and raw goats milk and I want to be as safe as possible. Our milk testing lab has informed me that they wouldn't even be able to tell from their routine testing if the milk is even contaminated with Y. pseudotuberculosis!

Appreciate any thoughts that you all may have, even if its been with a different bacterial infection or other contagious diseases. Would be a shame to cull the whole herd but at this point I do not know who's been potentially infected and if it may get into their milk.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No advice from pathology, the extension vet recommended antibiotics for the whole herd, of course :bonk:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
She is indeed tested negative for all of the other harmful bacteria (brucellosis, TB etc) the issue is that even if we did specifically test for this bactiria in the milk, it wouldn't necessarily shed into the milk all the time, and could come up later if she was a carrier.

I did read that it is antibiotic resistant but they were going to see if this particular strain is sensitive. Vet recommended "just trying LA200 anyways" which I am not so comfortable with.
 
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