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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this question will be met with a varied set of oppinions, but.

What breed of dog works well with a goat herd on the trail? I am leaning towards a border collie. Not for the herding instinct, but rather intelligence and agility. Hoping to provide some protection from other dogs and allert me to predators and game animals.
 

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I don't think this is the best breed choice, but any good dog can become protective of "their" goats if they spend enough time with them. My great dane is very protective of her goats....but not overly so. She does let other dogs know who the herd belongs to when they get to excited to meet the the goats.

Perhaps a LGD breed that goes out of the pasture with the goats from puppy age.
 

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I've backpacked with four different dogs and the goats. My australian sheperd is a miserable failure at herding. She doesn't want to be bossy, and is scared of livestock. Best dog ever by far that I've ever seen is a white german sheperd rescue from San Diego that took to following and protecting the goats like a duck to water. Totally innate. He was found starving in the suburbs, 7 years old, and had never seen a goat and it was like a light went on in his head and he just loves to be with them and keep them all organized in front of him on the trail. No training involved. My friend owns him, and he comes on hikes and goes packing with us. It is truly a thing of beauty. And he is a super mellow sweet guy with people and dogs. he is a little gruff if another german sheperd type dog comes up too agressively for him, but has never bitten or gotten in a big fight.
So what I've learned is that it is possible and probably preferable to get an adult dog, a rescue even, and try them out to see if they take to the goats. People say to get a puppy, but if you get a puppy you don't know what that dog's abilities and preferences will be when they mature. You can get part way to a good herd dog with training, but that white sheperd really convinced me that you can get pretty close to a great herd dog with very little training if you get the right dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My Australian shepherd has great herding instinct, but she gets car sick and is best kept at home. She's a great dog, finds deer and elk sheds by instinct, has wonderful endurance and agility. But she's puking within a few miles of home and hates traveling.
 

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We take our Australian Cattle Dog with us when we go goatpacking. She is very alert and agile, and has fantastic endurance (never gets tired) even when she's packing her own backpack. She's also quite protective when other dogs or strangers approach us on the trail - in fact we usually keep her on a leash if other people are around so she doesn't bite anyone!

But she's good with the goats and with us (and doesn't puke in the car! LOL!)

Ken
 

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Sorry if I'm posting a little late (still new). But I am in the same boat as JoeCool911 and don't know what type of dog would be good with goats without nipping at their ankles constantly. ... My husband and I have always wanted a Doberman. Whould a well trained Dobi be a good match? I have worked with them before and have found them to be suprisingly gentle, and have seen them being very affectionate and defensive with their owners' babys.

((not my photo, found it off of google images))
I don't have goats yet, but I'm doing a lot of planning and research in the mean time. (and since I am new, I can pretty much say that I have no idea what I am doing ... thats why I am here. I am eager to learn as much as possible about Pack Goats before I get them.)

You guys have great ideas and input. Thanks for having me here.

PS- your Aus. cattle dog is super cute Ken.
 

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Nanny K,
We fell in love with our first Doberman Aasta over 40 years ago and have never been without one sense. We have had as many as 6 adults and 22 pups at one time. None living in pens or on a chain ever. Peaceful co-existence living in our space with us. Through the years (on & off) we have sold well over 100 pups. We lost 4 Dobies last year (to numerous old age issues) including our beloved AJ (to a stroke). He was our hiking dog. If you came to the NAPgA rendezvous in Weippe and Meadow Lake you met AJ. Just before AJ's passing (AJ was the only Dobie we had at the time) we rehomed AJ's 1 yr. younger brother Aandee (from our daughter) to our home. Aandee was a wedding present to her and her husband 11 years ago. Aandee was at the beginning stages of spinal osteoarthritis and was going to need our assistance to keep his 112 lbs. on his feet and mobile. Thank God for Previcox and the Canadian pharmacy that we buy it from (over $4 a pill in the U.S.A.). Just after taking Aandee back my son in N. Carolina (who has 2 of our Dobies, Aabigale & Aamos) gave me a female pup we named Aarial. So we have 2 now and will have Aarial spayed.
Do I recommend Dobies as packgoat hiking protection. A well trained (they are very smart), obedient one, Absolutely Yes ! They are very controllable and none aggressive (yes you read that right, I've never had an aggressive Doberman). They are very capable of reading the situation and making a good decision and acting accordingly. But be careful of who you get a Pup from, stay clear of any breeding's that have the white Doberman genetics anywhere in the past. Be very picky. Pups should not be separated from there Mom or siblings until 11 weeks (minimum). This is for All breeds. We have an Anatolian Shepard that lives strictly with the livestock only. Fantastic LGD's, (very intelligent), but very large and vol-ital in a fight, hard to control if a fight starts. Could get you in trouble on the trail. Good Luck!
 

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My traildogs are Central Asian Shepherds. They are a livestock guardian breed & are wicked strong, agile, athletic, & have tons of stamina. They will pretty much eat any critter that messes with their herd or their people. They average about 100 pounds for bitches, 140 pounds for dogs, & pack about 30% of their body weight, although if my goats take to it, I will probably reduce the dogs' loads, at least after they've earned their packdog titles. :cool:

Here is me with my 4 year old girl, Astrid.

http://i.imgur.com/Gy4dHnvl.jpg
 

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I hike with my street dog from Istanbul (yes, I found him as a pup on the streets when I was living there and flew him with me when I moved back). It took him a week to decide the goats weren't food, then he became protective of them. He will even chase off other goats if they come to bother mine. He loves people, but gets too aggressive with strange dogs sometimes, and likes to hunt and chase wild animals, so on the trail he has to be on leash.
 

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