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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You need to have herding dogs such as border collie. https://vk.com/video-795607_456239063
So now even I have seen this film. I have tried a little with herding dogs, and I can tell you: To learn to train a dog like that, takes years upon years! In addition it takes at least a year to train the individual dog, if it is of a good line. Then you must train also the sheep. The sheep on the film are well trained with herding dogs. To train goats to something similar can take longer than with sheep. Some people think it is impossible to herd goats with a dog, but I have done it and found that it is only different, probably because of the different flock structures of sheep and goats.


It will be interesting to hear your experiences of herding goats with dogs from different countries!
 

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I have a dog, my son and found him already an adult dog. Driving along a deserted road, the son saw a beautiful dog and asked to take the dog and shelter her. Day was rainy and wet from rain dog especially pity. So we had a dog and called it BIM. BIM lived with us on a chain two years as a watchdog. One winter I decided to graze goats in the forest, but the goats did not want to go, then I thought that I would need an assistant and asked the BIm. Miracle dog without training properly started to graze goats and coped with their work 70%. Since then I always take him as an assistant and every time BIM grazes goats more competently.
Felidae Dog breed Carnivore Small to medium-sized cats Cat
 

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My family trained grey hounds, and bird dogs. My wife's family raised Hog dogs. It takes alot of time but usually they learned fairly quickly the basics. Takes alot of attention and devotion to a skill. That all said..some dogs are just natural, take little to no training with excellent results..mut dogs in particular.
 

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I want to add a Dog I sometimes used to protect stacks of hay from the goats, put the dog on a chain near the haystack. So BIM is familiar with goats and goat antics. Martin let BIM smell his horns many times :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@ReNat I think Bim looks like a border collie, and we do not know what training she had before your son found her. I am even more impressed that she endured two years at a chain without going crazy. If she is still alive, maybe you can share a photo with Bim and your goats? Then we can compare with the film you shared, and see if Bim also acts like a border collie! :) Congrats to a kind, compassionate son! :)

@MadCatX (What is a hog dog? Hog = pig?) In my opinion, we should try to breed those very easily trained dogs, in order to get herding dogs who do not depend on a devoted professional dog trainer to start working!
 

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I have a wonderful border collie. She herds chickens, cats, squirrels (but they take offense and run away), any animal you want, except adult does. She will bring back kids, yearlings, anything but adult does. Those, she looks at, looks at me and lays down. I've had her since she was 8 weeks old, I have never seen her get hurt by a doe. She just refuses to herd them. ( I've always wondered if she snuck into a pen once and did get rammed.). She is getting up in years now, so she basically sits on dh's lap and they watch tv!
 

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I imagine herding goats isnt as easy as herding sheep? My girls don't group tightly when they're scared. Some run, some turn to fight, running all different directions.
 

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I hare found that it takes two Border Collies to move goats. the goats need some training to understand if they stay close to me they are safe. My wife keeps trying to make moving goats a big production and is always surprised how easy it is for me to move them.
the hard part of having BC's is having enough work for them. to keep my dog occupied i have a chicken coop they can watch the chickens to there hearts content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
The first thing you must teach the sheep or what animals you plan to start herding with your dog, is that their last hour has not arrived just because a dog appears! Most people start training on sheep, but if your dog is breeded for bigger animals, it can be a challenge to make it lower its energy to suit the animals in front of him. If the dog is "weak", it might be best to use it on ducks, if "strong" maybe pigs or cows is what he needs to flourish.

To herd goats with a dog is special, but not at all impossible. Make the dog understand that he must keep a distance, to avoid triggering the goats to get nervous and turn their heads towards the supposed danger. A very "weak" dog who does not "dare" to "walk up" towards a hesitating goat will probably not be able to get enough authority, but a dog that constantly runs very close to the goats will have trouble in making himself understood.

Herding with dog(s) is a challenge because it includes communication over THREE species barriers! :inlove::imok: Dog - human. Sheep - human. And dog - sheep. :imok:

(One of my friends serves the day's treats, and then asks his dog to bark. The dog barks, and the goats come rushing! Why not? It works for them!)
 

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@Trollmor you got hog = pig, basically they are bigger dogs, think Pit Bulls, about 75-100lbs. They corner up the hog so it can be handled.
this is the kind of dog we have. except ours were raised around goats instead of pigs. A year or two ago one of our neighbors bought a pig and tied it up in some tall grass between our two properties. The dogs came across it, having never seen a pig before, and thought "what a lucky find!" and they latched onto it. The pig lost a lot of blood and died. We had to buy our neighbors a new pig. Our dogs now know they cannot play with pigs, but it was an expensive lesson.
 

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last year i was buying several Boar goats and the owned was having trouble catching the goats. so i asked if i could let my dog help and she was fed up chaising the goats so she said yes. I let the dog out of the truck and with in three minutes the goats were hugging us to stay away from the dog. we caught the goats i was buying and loaded them in the trailer. It was easy peasy. after the owner said that she needed a dog
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
that is the best description of herding i have ever heard.
I have found that my sheep know my dog commands. if the dogs are not there i can give a command and the sheep will respond to it.
Thank you! Goats will learn even more - for good and bad! Command without the dog present? Forget it! :p

But it IS a challenge! You must foresee what the sheep plan to do, and the sheep try to foresee what the dog it going to do, the dog is very good at foreseeing what the sheep are going to do, and you must remember that the dog is much better than yourself on this, all this at the same time as you might have some kind of emergency going on, like your animals eating the crop of the neighbour, or a very pregnant doe in the flock ... Oh, my brain boils by the mere thought of all this! :p
It was easy peasy. after the owner said that she needed a dog
I hope she did understand the work she must do to make the dog understand her wishes!!
 

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I have found that most Border Collies have the instinct to herd. I find that i need to watch the dog and work with what the dog is giving me. then after we understand what we are doing together then i add more commands. I start with bum lambs then move up to small groups of sheep then larger herd then the whole herd.
Stop thinking about all the training just focus on the now. take little steps go slow. do not panic shout stay calm and the most important thing is have fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes. Also the sheep should be able to like it, which many "herding dog people" forget. And some people believe that they buy a pup and it will function without any training. If it does, it is sheer luck!
 

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I have a dog, my son and found him already an adult dog. Driving along a deserted road, the son saw a beautiful dog and asked to take the dog and shelter her. Day was rainy and wet from rain dog especially pity. So we had a dog and called it BIM. BIM lived with us on a chain two years as a watchdog. One winter I decided to graze goats in the forest, but the goats did not want to go, then I thought that I would need an assistant and asked the BIm. Miracle dog without training properly started to graze goats and coped with their work 70%. Since then I always take him as an assistant and every time BIM grazes goats more competently. View attachment 149247
LOL. He should herd, you can see Border Collie all over him....... Beautiful Boy
 

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My best, overall, goat dog is 1/4 Rough Collie (yes, that is a breed) and 3/4 GP. She'll bring in the goats all by herself when there is a problem while the other dogs deal with the problem.

My goats are free range (when it isn't raining) and she manages to bring them home every time there is a problem. She does not herd them FOR ME. I am of no importance whatsoever to her. Like I can't tell her, "Put them THERE" when and where I want. She's like, ''Who the heck are you?''

But she'll bring them home when there is trouble and at night. They aren't there, and then they are. Like magic.
 
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