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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello friends here! First of all, thank you again for all your help and information you gave me. It seems like I have a really problematic buck here. (Or just I'm too aware of him)

He started coughing frequently these days. Maybe once per hour. I know it's not a big deal, but it starts to be more like a real dry cough than a harmless sneeze. On top of that, his voice became more higher in pitch than it ever was before. Almost like the bucklings' yelling.

Otherwise he is acting, eating, defecating well. Should I worry about him? I tought it can be some kind of infection or throat injury. We had a huge storm here that damaged most of our trees, so they can eat a lot of leafage, mostly black locust and walnut. I know locust thorns can be harmful, but it's normal here to feed goats (and even rabbits) with locust and they really love it!
 

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Goat Mentor
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Rectal temperature?
Does it sound like there is mucus?
Is there any raspy breathing or wheezing? Lung sounds?
Runny eyes or nose?
Does it get worse when running, chewing cud, or eating?
Are there any dusty conditions, especially in hay or feed?
Is feed and hay free of mold?
What are your current/recent weather and pasture conditions? Wet pasture, warm and rainy, or cold and dry, cold and rainy, etc.
How long has it been going on for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
# Rectal temperature?
He had normal temperature when I last measured it. I will repeat.

# Does it sound like there is mucus?
I think there is some mucus, but his nose and mouth is clean.

# Is there any raspy breathing or wheezing? Lung sounds?
Normal breathing, nothing strange besides the coughing.

# Runny eyes or nose?
Clean eyes and nose.

# Does it get worse when running, chewing cud, or eating?
It seems random for me, but I will try to investigate it further.

# Are there any dusty conditions, especially in hay or feed?
The weather is really hot here, so there are a lot of dust, but not in their sleeping place. Btw it is a cavern house now, made from rhyolite tuff so it can be dusty, but not in a dangerous level. (People lived there a few decades ago)

# Is feed and hay free of mold?
Not really. The fresh hay will arrive next week. Until then I feed them with the hay from last year, which is a bit infected with mold. I always sort out the infected part, and feed them with the good dust and mold free part. Minimal mold can still be present of course.

# What are your current/recent weather and pasture conditions? Wet pasture, warm and rainy, or cold and dry, cold and rainy, etc.
I partly answered this question before. So, the weather is varied here. One week of cold and rain after a week of dry and warm. It's going for the last 2 months.

# How long has it been going on for?
I think it's going on for the last 3 weeks. (At most)

I will measure his temperature again and try to look down to his throat. But it seems impossible to do without injuring anybody :(

Here's a picture of him:
feri_eating.jpg

I will also try to record the sound of his cough.
Thank you for your great check list!
 

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Goat Mentor
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Moldy hay? Big no no. See if it goes away after the switch.

I would give 2-3 cloves of garlic daily.

Lungworm could very much be possible, however usually lungworm-caused coughing is heard after running and playing. If you are willing to get a fecal done (baerman) for lungworm, I think that’s a good idea. However, if you are one to treat without a fecal, I would give garlic and non-moldy hay first and see if it changes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry for the late response. The news:

I did a Baerman test and it was free of any worms. I learned that Baerman is not efficient in the case of lungworms because only their eggs may be present in the fecal sample. I'm not able to do that kind of examination for worm eggs :(

We are about to find a vet who will examine the herd, but its difficult. It looks like everybody is really busy and specialized on pets here.

The new hay and alfalfa is late. Maybe it will arrive next week.

The doe and the kid is still healthy, free of any symptom.

We had behavior problems last week and I followed this (https://www.packgoatcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?tid=172) instructions. When I tipped him and he was on his back, he began to snore. When I released him, he immediately started coughing. The cough is mostly dry, and I suspect the problem is in his upper respiratory tract, despite his nose and mouth is clean.
 
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